Results for 'J. M. Wober'

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  1.  6
    Never Mind the Picture, Sense the Screen.J. M. Wober - 1988 - Journal of Moral Education 16 (2):87-93.
    Abstract It is often thought that bookwork is likely to be hampered by an accompaniment of television, or more simply of music. Others allege that television reduces the time that is spent with books or writing. It is helpful, therefore, to use a very large survey sample to find out how many people do perform intellectual homework, and how many of these do so with television (or musical) accompaniment. It is clear that doing homework, and doing so with television or (...)
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  2.  2
    The Tottering Of Totems On TV. Some Implications Of The Diffusion of News in Britain.J. M. Wober - 1995 - Communications 20 (1):7-24.
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  3.  2
    The Force of Knowledge: The Scientific Dimension of Society.J. M. Ziman - 1976 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this 1976 volume, Professor Ziman paints a broad picture of science, and of its relations to the world in general. He sets the scene by the historical development of scientific research as a profession, the growth of scientific technologies out of the useful arts, the sources of invention and technical innovation, and the advent of Big Science. He then discusses the economics of research and development, the connections between science and war, the nature of science policy and the moral (...)
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  4. W.J.M.M., Political Questions Essays in Honour of W. J. M. Mackenzie.W. J. M. Mackenzie, Brian Chapman & Allen Meyers Potter - 1974
     
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  5. Real Science: What It is, and What It Means.J. M. Ziman - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Scientists and 'anti-scientists' alike need a more realistic image of science. The traditional mode of research, academic science, is not just a 'method': it is a distinctive culture, whose members win esteem and employment by making public their findings. Fierce competition for credibility is strictly regulated by established practices such as peer review. Highly specialized international communities of independent experts form spontaneously and generate the type of knowledge we call 'scientific' - systematic, theoretical, empirically-tested, quantitative, and so on. Ziman shows (...)
     
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  6.  75
    Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics.J. M. Bernstein - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Theodor W. Adorno is best known for his contributions to aesthetics and social theory. Critics have always complained about the lack of a practical, political or ethical dimension to Adorno's philosophy. In this highly original contribution to the literature on Adorno, J. M. Bernstein offers the first attempt in any language to provide an account of the ethical theory latent in Adorno's writings. Bernstein relates Adorno's ethics to major trends in contemporary moral philosophy. He analyses the full range of Adorno's (...)
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  7. "Poetry and Dialectic": J. M. Cameron. [REVIEW]J. M. Ellis - 1962 - British Journal of Aesthetics 2 (3):290.
     
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  8.  26
    Scepticism—Philosophical and Everyday: J. M. Hinton.J. M. Hinton - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (248):219-243.
    Many years ago we often witnessed a testy insistence, on the part of some purist, that some very familiar philosophical ‘ism’ be defined before being discussed; when most people either thought that had been done already or were happy to wait for the discussion itself to identify the ‘ism’. The old new style, that featured those unexpected demands for definition, ended by trying people's patience in its turn. Today there is a widespread assumption that we know, well enough, what is (...)
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  9.  93
    Public Knowledge: An Essay Concerning the Social Dimension of Science.J. M. Ziman - 1968 - London: Cambridge University Press.
    In this 1974 book a practising scientist and gifted expositor sets forth an exciting point of view on the nature of science and how it works.
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  10.  52
    Contributions to Logic and Methodology in Honor of J. M. Bochenski. [REVIEW]J. M. P. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):607-607.
    This is the collection of essays presented to Bochenski on his 60th birthday, and it contains, as a mirror of Bochenski's own work, a broad spectrum of studies ranging from formal logic and history of logic, to the philosophy of logic and language, and to the methodology of explanation in Greek philosophy. Of the seventeen articles, these are some of the more important to the reviewer: "Betrachtungen zum Sequenzen Kalkül" by Paul Bernays, which is an extensive study of Gentzen-type formulations (...)
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  11. Reliable Knowledge: An Exploration of the Grounds for Belief in Science.J. M. Ziman - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (3):311-314.
     
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  12. Torture and Dignity: An Essay on Moral Injury.J. M. Bernstein - 2015 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this unflinching look at the experience of suffering and one of its greatest manifestations—torture—J.M. Bernstein critiques the repressions of traditional moral theory, showing that our morals are not immutable ideals but fragile constructions that depend on our experience of suffering itself. Morals, Bernstein argues, not only guide our conduct but also express the depth of mutual dependence that we share as vulnerable and injurable individuals. Beginning with the attempts to abolish torture in the eighteenth century, and then sensitively examining (...)
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  13. Experiences: An Inquiry Into Some Ambiguities.J. M. Hinton - 1973 - Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    Someone who has more sympathy with traditional empiricism than with much of present-day philosophy may ask himself: 'How do my experiences give rise to my beliefs about an external world, and to what extent do they justify them?' He wants to refer, among other things, to unremarkable experiences, of a sort which he cannot help believing to be so extremely common that it would be ridiculous to call them common experiences. He mainly has in mind sense-experiences, and he thinks of (...)
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  14.  23
    Recovering Ethical Life: Jürgen Habermas and the Future of Critical Theory.J. M. Bernstein - 1995 - Routledge.
    Jurgen Habermas' construction of a critical social theory of society grounded in communicative reason is one of the very few real philosophical inventions of recent times that demands and repays extended engagement. In this elaborate and sympathetic study which places Habermas' project in the context of critical theory as a whole past and future, J. M. Bernstein argues that despite its undoubted achievements, it contributes to the very problems of ethical dislocation and meaninglessness it aims to diagnose and remedy. Bernstein (...)
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  15.  69
    Imagination: A Study in the History of Ideas.J. M. Cocking - 1991 - Routledge.
    Many writers have paid tribute to its power: Shakespeare urged his audiences to use it to create a setting; Hobbes asserted that "imagination and memory are but one thing; " for Wordsworth it was "the mightiest leveler known to moral world; " and to Baudelaire it represented "the queen of truth. " Imagination as artistic, poetic, and cultural predicate remains one of the most influential ideas in the history of Western thought. It has been simultaneously feared as a dangerous, uncontrollable (...)
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  16.  50
    A Theory of the Electrical Properties of Liquid Metals. I: The Monovalent Metals.J. M. Ziman - 1961 - Philosophical Magazine 6 (68):1013-1034.
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  17.  98
    A Survey of Abstract Algebraic Logic.J. M. Font, R. Jansana & D. Pigozzi - 2003 - Studia Logica 74 (1-2):13 - 97.
  18.  71
    Malthus on Colonization and Economic Development: A Comparison with Adam Smith*: J. M. Pullen.J. M. Pullen - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (2):243-266.
    Malthus did not leave us with a systematic treatment of colonization, but from remarks scattered throughout his publications and correspondence it is possible to assemble a fairly coherent account of his views on the advantages and disadvantages of colonies, and on the reasons why some have failed and others succeeded. Included in these scattered remarks are some comparisons between his own views on colonies and those of Adam Smith. The question of the relationship between Malthus and Adam Smith is a (...)
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  19.  54
    The Fate of Art: Aesthetic Alienation From Kant to Derrida and Adorno.J. M. Bernstein - 1992 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Aesthetic alienation may be described as the paradoxical relationship whereby art and truth have come to be divorced from one another while nonetheless remaining entwined. J. M. Bernstein not only finds the separation of art and truth problematic, but also contends that we continue to experience art as sensuous and particular, thus complicating and challenging the cultural self-understanding of modernity. Bernstein focuses on the work of four key philosophers—Kant, Heidegger, Derrida, and Adorno—and provides powerful new interpretations of their views. Bernstein (...)
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  20. 'I Am a Christian and Cannot Fight' [Signed J.M.R.].M. R. J. & Christian - 1907
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  21. Logic and Philosophy for Linguists a Book of Readings; Edited by J.M.E. Moravcsik. --.J. M. E. Moravcsik - 1974 - Humanities Press.
     
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  22.  27
    Facts and Values. [REVIEW]J. M. P. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (2):379-380.
    Subtitled "Studies in Ethical Analysis," this collection of eleven essays, most of which have previously appeared in journals, deals with a number of problems central to modern ethical theory: the emotive interpretation of ethical language, persuasive definitions and their role in ethical reasoning, the cognitive versus emotive conceptions of ethics: many of these problems were first raised and examined by Stevenson in his earlier book Ethics and Language. Other essays are of a less retrospective nature: studies on Moore and Dewey, (...)
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  23. The Zygote Argument Remixed.J. M. Fischer - 2011 - Analysis 71 (2):267-272.
    John and Mary have fully consensual sex, but they do not want to have a child, so they use contraception with the intention of avoiding pregnancy. Unfortunately, although they used the contraception in the way in which it is supposed to be used, Mary has become pregnant. The couple decides to have the baby, whom they name ‘Ernie’. Now we fill in the story a bit. The universe is causally deterministic, and 30 years later Ernie performs some action A and (...)
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  24. The Truth About Freedom: A Reply to Merricks.J. M. Fischer & P. Todd - 2011 - Philosophical Review 120 (1):97-115.
    In his recent essay in the Philosophical Review, “Truth and Freedom,” Trenton Merricks contends (among other things) that the basic argument for the incompatibility of God's foreknowledge and human freedom is question-begging. He relies on a “truism” to the effect that truth depends on the world and not the other way around. The present essay argues that mere invocation of this truism does not establish that the basic argument for incompatibilism is question-begging. Further, it seeks to clarify important elements of (...)
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  25. Censure and Heresy at the University of Paris, 1200-1400.J. M. M. H. Thijssen - 1998
     
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  26. Suffering Injustice: Misrecognition as Moral Injury in Critical Theory.J. M. Bernstein - 2005 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (3):303 – 324.
    It is the persistence of social suffering in a world in which it could be eliminated that for Adorno is the source of the need for critical reflection, for philosophy. Philosophy continues and gains its cultural place because an as yet unbridgeable abyss separates the social potential for the relief of unnecessary human suffering and its emphatic continuance. Philosophy now is the culturally bound repository for the systematic acknowledgement and articulation of the meaning of the expanse of human suffering within (...)
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  27.  32
    Hegel’s Hermeneutics.J. M. Bernstein - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (1):158.
    Arguably, the most promising and compelling route to demonstrating the significance of Hegel’s thought to contemporary philosophy has been the series of recent readings that construe Hegel as continuing and completing Kant’s Copernican turn. Paul Redding explicitly locates his interpretation within this program, seeing the hermeneutic dimension of Hegel’s thought as providing for the possibility of continuing the Kantian project. Kant’s Copernican turn can be loosely stated as the procedure of reflectively uncovering unexperienced conditions of experience that contribute to the (...)
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  28.  39
    Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics.J. M. Bernstein (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 2002 volume brings together major works by German thinkers, writing just prior to and after Kant, who were enormously influential in this crucial period of aesthetics. These texts include the first translation into English of Schiller's Kallias Letters and Moritz's On the Artistic Imitation of the Beautiful, together with translations of some of Hölderlin's most important theoretical writings and works by Hamann, Lessing, Novalis and Schlegel. In a philosophical introduction J. M. Bernstein traces the development of aesthetics from its (...)
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  29.  31
    J. M. H. Fritz, Professional Civility: Communicative Virtue at Work: Peter Lang, New York, 2013, XIV, 273 Pp, ISBN 978-1-4331-1985-9 Hb. [REVIEW]Annette M. Holba - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):645-649.
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  30.  7
    J. Wilson and B. Cowell on the Democratic Myth.J. M. Tarrant - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 18 (1):123–127.
  31. A Short History of Western Legal Theory.J. M. Kelly - 1992 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This unique publication outlines the development of legal theory from pre-Roman times to the twentieth century. It aims to relate the evolution of legal theory to parallel developments in political history, and accordingly offers the reader an account of relevant contemporaneous political, religious, and economic events. Each chapter commences with a general historical background for the relevant period, and discusses how political events and political and legal theory are both related to one another and occasionally influence one another.No other English (...)
     
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  32.  57
    The Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy of John Buridan.J. M. M. H. Thijssen & Jack Zupko (eds.) - 2001 - Brill.
    This book is a collection of papers on the metaphysics and natural philosophy of John Buridan (ca. 1295-1361), one of the most innovative and influential ...
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  33.  13
    Puzzles, Problems, and Enigmas: Occasional Pieces on the Human Aspects of Science.J. M. Ziman - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
    A discussion of the human side of science, originally published in 1981.
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  34.  14
    Chapters on Mediaeval and Renaissance Visitors to Greek Lands . By J. M. Paton. Pp. Xii + 212. Princeton: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1951. Price Not Given. [REVIEW]A. M. Woodward & J. M. Paton - 1952 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 72:122-122.
  35.  32
    Beyond Optimizing: A Study of Rational Choice.J. M. Moravcsik - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):237-241.
  36.  33
    The Problem of “Problem Choice”.J. M. Ziman - 1987 - Minerva 25 (1-2):92-106.
  37.  43
    The Fine Structure of Psychological Time.J. M. Stroud - 1967 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 138:623-631.
  38.  42
    The Fine Structure of Psychological Time.J. M. Stroud - 1957 - In H. Quastler (ed.), Information Theory in Psychology: Problems and Methods. Free Press.
  39.  20
    Ainos: Its History and Coinage 474–341 B.C. By J. M. F. May. Pp. Xvi + 288. 10 Pll., 4 Maps. London: Geoffrey Cumberlege, 1950. 25s. [REVIEW]G. K. Jenkins & J. M. F. May - 1952 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 72:158-158.
  40.  30
    Marx’s Attempt to Leave Philosophy. [REVIEW]J. M. Bernstein - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (2):275-278.
    Arguably, there is no gesture more typical to philosophy than its repudiation, the sense that philosophical endeavor is a symptom of the pathologies or dislocations of everyday life it seeks to remedy. Throughout the nineteenth century—in the writings of the German Romantics, Young Hegelians, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche—the repudiation of philosophy is a constant. Sometimes this repudiation takes a reflective form in which traditional philosophical claims are translated into another vocabulary, or are deflated ; sometimes alternative methods are adopted that (...)
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  41.  13
    The Ancient World. By J. M. Todd. Pp. 407; 23 Pl. And 7 Maps. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1938. 9s. 6d.D. E. L. Haynes & J. M. Todd - 1939 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 59 (1):159-159.
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  42. HUNTER, J. F. M. Understanding Wittgenstein: Studies of 'Philosophical Investigations'. [REVIEW]J. M. Hinton - 1987 - Philosophy 62:111.
     
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  43.  34
    The Ways of Paradox and Other Essays. [REVIEW]J. M. P. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 20 (1):158-159.
    This volume is published concurrently with the one reviewed below and together they unite a number of Quine's previously scattered papers into two compact volumes; this volume deals with his more philosophical work while the other is concerned with more purely technical logical studies. The twenty-one essays cover the period 1934-1964 and none have appeared between hard covers before. Several of the articles—"The ways of paradox," "Foundations of mathematics," "On the application of modern logic," and "Necessary truth"—are essentially popular expositions. (...)
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  44. Plato and Platonism: Plato's Conception of Appearance and Reality in Ontology, Epistemology, and Ethics, and its Modern Echoes.J. M. E. Moravcsik - 1992 - Blackwell.
    Plato and Platonism reviews the natures and limits of Platonic interpretation. Students, academics and researchers will find that Moravcsik's careful and rigorous analysis offers an understanding of what Platonism in our times would have been like. The book leads us to an appreciation of genuine Platonism, rarely discussed today.
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  45.  11
    The Basic Laws of Arithmetic: Exposition of the System. [REVIEW]J. M. P. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):810-810.
    This book is a translation of some of the more important parts of the Grundgesetze of Frege: the introduction, the first part of the first volume which gives an exposition of the construction, rules, axioms of Frege's formal system, and two appendices, one of which is from the second volume and gives Frege's analysis of the paradox found by Russell in his system. The editor has provided a long introduction "for those not familiar with Frege," although it will benefit those (...)
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  46.  55
    Algebraic Logic for Classical Conjunction and Disjunction.J. M. Font & V. Verdú - 1993 - Studia Logica 52 (1):181.
    In this paper we study the relations between the fragment L of classical logic having just conjunction and disjunction and the variety D of distributive lattices, within the context of Algebraic Logic. We prove that these relations cannot be fully expressed either with the tools of Blok and Pigozzi's theory of algebraizable logics or with the use of reduced matrices for L. However, these relations can be naturally formulated when we introduce a new notion of model of a sequent calculus. (...)
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  47. William James' Theory of Emotions: Filling in the Picture.J. M. Barbalet - 1999 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 29 (3):251–266.
    The theory of emotion developed by William James has been subject to four criticisms. First, it is held that Jamesian emotion is without function, that it plays no role in cognition and behavior. Second, that James ignores the role of experience in emotion. Third, that James overstated the role of physical processes in emotion. Fourth, that James’ theory of emotion has been experimentally demonstrated to be false. A fifth point, less an explicit criticism than an assumption, holds that James has (...)
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  48. Advice to Young Men, and, Incidentally, to Young Women, in the Middle and Higher Ranks of Life, in a Series of Letters. With Notes [Signed J.M.]. [REVIEW]William Cobbett & M. J. - 1874
  49.  46
    M. J. Vermaseren: The Legend of Attis in Greek and Roman Art. (´tudesPréliminaires aux Religions Orientales Dans l'Empire Romain, Ix.) Pp. 59; 40 Plates. Leiden: Brill, 1966. Paper, Fl. 32. [REVIEW]J. M. Cook - 1967 - The Classical Review 17 (03):403-.
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  50.  8
    M. J. Vermaseren: The Legend of Attis in Greek and Roman Art. Pp. 59; 40 Plates. Leiden: Brill, 1966. Paper, Fl. 32.J. M. Cook - 1967 - The Classical Review 17 (3):403-403.
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