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James Pustejovsky [20]J. Pustejovsky [2]John Pustejovsky [1]
  1.  52
    The syntax of event structure.James Pustejovsky - 1992 - In Beth Levin & Steven Pinker (eds.), Lexical & Conceptual Semantics. Blackwell. pp. 47-81.
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  2.  21
    The syntax of event structure.James Pustejovsky - 1991 - Cognition 41 (1-3):47-81.
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  3.  67
    Computational Thought Experiments for a More Rigorous Philosophy and Science of the Mind.Iris Oved, Nikhil Krishnaswamy, James Pustejovsky & Joshua Hartshorne - 2024 - In L. K. Samuelson, S. L. Frank, M. Toneva, A. Mackey & E. Hazeltine (eds.), Proceedings of the 46th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. CC BY. pp. 601-609.
    We offer philosophical motivations for a method we call Virtual World Cognitive Science (VW CogSci), in which researchers use virtual embodied agents that are embedded in virtual worlds to explore questions in the field of Cognitive Science. We focus on questions about mental and linguistic representation and the ways that such computational modeling can add rigor to philosophical thought experiments, as well as the terminology used in the scientific study of such representations. We find that this method forces researchers to (...)
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  4. The metaphysics of words in context.Nicholas Asher & James Pustejovsky - unknown
     
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  5.  75
    The comparative neuroprimatology 2018 road map for research on How the Brain Got Language.Michael A. Arbib, Francisco Aboitiz, Judith M. Burkart, Michael C. Corballis, Gino Coudé, Erin Hecht, Katja Liebal, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, James Pustejovsky, Shelby S. Putt, Federico Rossano, Anne E. Russon, P. Thomas Schoenemann, Uwe Seifert, Katerina Semendeferi, Chris Sinha, Dietrich Stout, Virginia Volterra, Sławomir Wacewicz & Benjamin Wilson - 2018 - Interaction Studies 19 (1-2):370-387.
    We present a new road map for research on “How the Brain Got Language” that adopts an EvoDevoSocio perspective and highlights comparative neuroprimatology – the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in extant monkeys and great apes – as providing a key grounding for hypotheses on the last common ancestor of humans and monkeys and chimpanzees and the processes which guided the evolution LCA-m → LCA-c → protohumans → H. sapiens. Such research constrains and is constrained by analysis of (...)
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  6.  26
    From actions to events.James Pustejovsky - 2018 - Interaction Studies 19 (1-2):289-317.
    In this paper, I argue that an important component of the language-ready brain is the ability to recognize and conceptualize events. By ‘event’, I mean any situation or activity in the world or our mental life, that we find salient enough to individuate as a thought or word. While this may sound either trivial or non-unique to humans, I hope to show that abstracting away events and their participants from the embodied flow of experience is a characteristic unique to humans. (...)
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  7.  11
    Lexical knowledge representation and natural language processing.James Pustejovsky & Branimir Boguraev - 1993 - Artificial Intelligence 63 (1-2):193-223.
  8.  36
    Type construction and the logic of concepts.James Pustejovsky - 2001 - In Pierrette Bouillon & Federica Busa (eds.), The Language of Word Meaning. Cambridge University Press. pp. 91123.
  9.  13
    The Language of Time: A Reader.Inderjeet Mani, James Pustejovsky & Robert Gaizauskas (eds.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This reader collects and introduces important work in linguistics, computer science, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics on the use of linguistic devices in natural languages to situate events in time: whether they are past, present, or future; whether they are real or hypothetical; when an event might have occurred, and how long it could have lasted. In focussing on the treatment and retrieval of time-based information it seeks to lay the foundation for temporally-aware natural language computer processing systems, for example (...)
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  10. Linguistic constraints on type coercion.James Pustejovsky - 1995 - In Patrick Saint-Dizier & Evelyne Viegas (eds.), Computational lexical semantics. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 71--97.
     
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  11. Lexical semantics: the problem of polysemy.J. Pustejovsky & Bran Boguraev (eds.) - 1997 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Lexical ambiguity presents one of the most intractable problems for language processing studies and, not surprisingly, it is at the core of research in lexical semantics. Originally published as two special issues of the Journal of Semantics, this collection focuses on the problem of polysemy, from the point of view of practitioners of computational linguistics.
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  12.  10
    Neither neural networks nor the language-of-thought alone make a complete game.Iris Oved, Nikhil Krishnaswamy, James Pustejovsky & Joshua K. Hartshorne - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e285.
    Cognitive science has evolved since early disputes between radical empiricism and radical nativism. The authors are reacting to the revival of radical empiricism spurred by recent successes in deep neural network (NN) models. We agree that language-like mental representations (language-of-thoughts [LoTs]) are part of the best game in town, but they cannot be understood independent of the other players.
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  13.  37
    The comparative neuroprimatology 2018 (CNP-2018) road map for research on How the Brain Got Language.Michael A. Arbib, Francisco Aboitiz, Judith M. Burkart, Michael Corballis, Gino Coudé, Erin Hecht, Katja Liebal, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, James Pustejovsky, Shelby Putt, Federico Rossano, Anne E. Russon, P. Thomas Schoenemann, Uwe Seifert, Katerina Semendeferi, Chris Sinha, Dietrich Stout, Virginia Volterra, Sławomir Wacewicz & Benjamin Wilson - 2018 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 19 (1-2):370-387.
    We present a new road map for research on “How the Brain Got Language” that adopts an EvoDevoSocio perspective and highlights comparative neuroprimatology – the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in extant monkeys and great apes – as providing a key grounding for hypotheses on the last common ancestor of humans and monkeys and chimpanzees and the processes which guided the evolution LCA-m → LCA-c → protohumans → H. sapiens. Such research constrains and is constrained by analysis of (...)
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  14.  23
    Editorial.Markus Egg, Manfred Pinkal & James Pustejovsky - 2001 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 10 (4):411-416.
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  15. Underspecification.[Special i ssue].Markus Egg, Manfred Pinkal & James Pustejovsky - 2001 - Journal of Logic, Language, and Information 10 (4).
  16. Formal Ontology and Lexical Semantics.J. Pustejovsky - 1998 - In Nicola Guarino (ed.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. Ios Press. pp. 98.
     
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  17.  29
    Lexical shadowing and argument closure.James Pustejovsky - 2000 - In Yael Ravin & Claudia Leacock (eds.), Polysemy: theoretical and computational approaches. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 68--90.
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  18. The Human Semantic Potential.James Pustejovsky - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):74-75.
  19.  39
    Penrose's grand unified mystery.David Waltz & James Pustejovsky - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):688-690.