6 found
Order:
  1.  20
    Categorical Perception of Colour in the Left and Right Visual Field is Verbally Mediated: Evidence From Korean.Debi Roberson, Hyensou Pak & J. Richard Hanley - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):752-762.
  2.  22
    Thresholds for Color Discrimination in English and Korean Speakers.Debi Roberson, J. Richard Hanley & Hyensou Pak - 2009 - Cognition 112 (3):482-487.
    Categorical perception (CP) is said to occur when a continuum of equally spaced physical changes is perceived as unequally spaced as a function of category membership (Harnad, S. (Ed.) (1987). Psychophysical and cognitive aspects of categorical perception: A critical overview. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). A common suggestion is that CP for color arises because perception is qualitatively distorted when we learn to categorize a dimension. Contrary to this view, we here report that English speakers show no evidence of lowered discrimination (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  3.  36
    Phonological Awareness and Visual Skills in Learning to Read Chinese and English.H. S. Huang & J. Richard Hanley - 1995 - Cognition 54 (1):73-98.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  4.  12
    The Tip-of-the-Tongue Phenomenon: Do Experimenter-Presented Interlopers Have Any Effect?Timothy J. Perfect & J. Richard Hanley - 1992 - Cognition 45 (1):55-75.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5. Cognitive Neuropsychology and the Philosophy of Mind.J. Richard Hanley - 1991 - In Raymond Tallis & Howard Robinson (eds.), The Pursuit of Mind. Carcanet. pp. 70.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  13
    The Man Who Mistook His Neuropsychologist for a Popstar: When Configural Processing Fails in Acquired Prosopagnosia.Ashok Jansari, Scott Miller, Laura Pearce, Stephanie Cobb, Noam Sagiv, Adrian L. Williams, Jeremy J. Tree & J. Richard Hanley - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.