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  1.  70
    Plato and Allegorical Interpretation.J. Tate - 1929 - Classical Quarterly 23 (3-4):142-.
    Allegorical interpretation of the ancient Greek myths began not with the grammarians, but with the philosophers. As speculative thought developed, there grew up also the belief that in mystical and symbolic terms the ancient poets had expressed profound truths which were difficult to define in scientifically exact language. Assuming that the myth-makers were concerned to edify and to instruct, the philosophers found in apparent immoralities and impieties a warning that both in offensive and in inoffensive passages one must look beneath (...)
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  2.  95
    ‘Imitation’ in Plato's Republic.J. Tate - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (1):16-23.
    It has become a standing reproach upon Plato's treatment of poetry in the Republic that he forgets or misrepresents in the tenth book what he said in the third.According to the earlier discussion, poetry is required to perform important services in the ideal state; its subject-matter will make the young familiar with true doctrines ; its style will reflect the qualities proper to the character of guardian, and therefore—by the principle of imitation—induce and confirm such qualities in the souls of (...)
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  3.  92
    Plato and 'Imitation.'.J. Tate - 1932 - Classical Quarterly 26 (3-4):161-.
    In C.Q., January, 1928, pp. 16 sqq., I examined afresh the two discussions of poetry as imitation which are found in Plato's Republic. I pointed out that Plato used the term ‘imitation’ in two senses, a good and a bad. The only kind of poetry which Plato excludes from his ideal state is that which is imitative in the bad sense of the term. He admits, and indeed welcomes, that kind of poetry which is imitative in the good sense , (...)
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  4.  36
    The FairWear Campaign: An Ethical Network in the Australian Garment Industry.Rosaria Burchielli, Annie Delaney, Jane Tate & Kylie Coventry - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):575 - 588.
    In many parts of the world, homework is a form of labour characterised by precariousness, lack of regulation, and invisibility and lack of protection of the workers who are often amongst the world's poorest and most exploited. Homework is spreading, due to firm practices such as outsourcing. The analysis and understanding of complex corporate networks may assist with the identification and protection of those most at risk within the supply chain network. It can also expose some of the key ethical (...)
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  5.  31
    On Plato: Laws X 889CD.J. Tate - 1936 - Classical Quarterly 30 (2):48-54.
    The problem suggested by this passage cannot be properly appreciated unless it is shown first of all that the treatment of poetry and art in the Laws fundamentally agrees with, though of course in some respects it provides a welcome supplement to, the attitude set forth in the Republic and elsewhere by Plato. The demand that music and poetry should ‘imitate’ the good; and that this ‘imitation’ should have meaning and accuracy, and be free from mere emotionalism directly recalls the (...)
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  6.  35
    On the History of Allegorism.J. Tate - 1934 - Classical Quarterly 28 (02):105-.
    I have shown in an earlier article that from the second half of the fifth century onwards the desire to defend Homer and Hesiod against accusations of immorality was certainly not the main motive which actuated the allegorical interpreters of the early poets. That desire, no doubt, existed; but the part which it played was wholly a subordinate one. In the present article I propose first to consider allegorism in its earlier stages, and to state my case for holding that (...)
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  7.  61
    Locke, toleration and natural law: A reassessment.John William Tate - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory 16 (1).
    There is an increasingly prevalent view among some contemporary Locke scholars that Locke's political philosophy is thoroughly subordinate to theological imperatives, centered on natural law. This article challenges this point of view by critically evaluating this interpretation of Locke as advanced by some of its leading proponents. This interpretation perceives natural law as the governing principle of Locke's political philosophy, and the primary source of transition and reconciliation within it. This article advances a very different reading of Locke's political philosophy, (...)
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  8.  33
    Greek for 'Atheism.'.J. Tate - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (01):3-5.
  9.  26
    Socrates and the Myths.J. Tate - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (02):74-.
    In Plato's Euthyphro two suggestions are offered to account for the accusation of impiety brought against Socrates. The first comes from Euthyphro , who takes it that the accusation is directed primarily against Socrates' ‘divine sign.’ The second is made by Socrates himself , who puts forward the view that he is being brought to trial because he refuses to accept such tales about the gods as Hesiod told regarding the maltreatment of Uranus by Cronus and of Cronus by Zeus—tales (...)
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  10.  52
    The Hermeneutic Circle vs. the Enlightenment.John W. Tate - 1998 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1998 (110):9-38.
  11.  20
    The Hermeneutic Circle vs. the Enlightenment.J. W. Tate - 1998 - Télos 1998 (110):9-38.
  12.  53
    Dividing Locke from God.John William Tate - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (2):133-164.
    A “recent consensus” has emerged in Locke studies that has sought to place theology at the center of Locke's political philosophy, insisting that the validity and cogency of Locke's political conclusions cannot be substantiated independently of the theology that resides at their foundation. This paper argues for the need to distance Locke from God, claiming that not only can we “bracket” the normative conclusions of Locke's political philosophy from their theological foundations, but that this was in fact Locke's own intention, (...)
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  13.  71
    Locke, God, and Civil Society.John William Tate - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (2):222-228.
    Timothy Stanton is the latest in a line of Locke scholars who, in focusing on Locke's theological commitments, have sought to place these at the center of his political philosophy. Stanton insists that those who interpret Locke's political philosophy in more material terms, centered on individual liberty, government authority, and the need to reconcile both via consent, apply to it a misleading "picture" and fail to perceive its essentials. By showing that this is precisely how Locke himself intended his political (...)
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  14. Free speech or equal respect?: Liberalism's competing values.John William Tate - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (9):987-1020.
    This article looks at liberalism as a political tradition encompassing competing and, at times, incommensurable values. It looks in particular at the potential conflict between the values of free speech and equal respect. Both of these are foundational values for liberalism, in the sense that they arise as normative ideals from the very inception of the liberal tradition itself. Yet from the perspective of this tradition, it is by no means clear which of these values should be prioritized in those (...)
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  15.  11
    Losing touch.Marliese Dion Nist, Tondi M. Harrison, Judith Tate, Audrey Robinson, Michele Balas & Rita H. Pickler - 2020 - Nursing Inquiry 27 (3):e12368.
    The need for human touch is universal among critical care patients and is an important component of the nurse–patient relationship. However, multiple barriers to human touch exist in the critical care environment. With little research to guide practice, we argue for the importance of human touch in the provision of holistic nursing care.
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  16.  31
    Θήσεμς ςτεø. Τζαννέταατος : Σύμμικτα Pp. 40. Athens1949. Paper, δp. 7000.J. Tate - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (01):52-53.
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  17.  23
    A. D. Winspeas and T. Silverberg: Who mas Socrates? Pp. 96. New York: The Cordon Company, 1939. Cloth, $1.25.J. Tate - 1939 - The Classical Review 53 (5-6):218-.
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  18.  54
    A sententious divide: Erasing the two faces of liberalism.John William Tate - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (8):953-980.
    The political philosopher John Gray is a foremost critic of the liberal tradition. But while many have engaged with Gray concerning aspects of this tradition, few have challenged Gray’s conception of the tradition as a whole. Yet it is precisely this broader, background element in Gray’s account that is most problematic and that requires excavation if we are to reveal the deeper shortcomings of his critique as a whole. This article challenges Gray’s claim, made in 2000, that the liberal tradition (...)
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  19.  29
    Ancient Thought in Translation.J. Tate - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (01):24-.
  20.  13
    Cornutus and the Poets.J. Tate - 1929 - Classical Quarterly 23 (1):41-45.
    No modern writer, so far as I am aware, has called attention to the peculiar attitude adopted by Cornutus towards Homer and Hesiod. My object in this article is to state his attitude, and attempt some account of its significance for the history of Greek allegorical interpretation of poetry.
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  21.  30
    C. C. Jernigan: Incongruity in Aristophanes. Pp.48. Menasha, Wis.: Banta Publishing Company, 1939. Paper.J. Tate - 1939 - The Classical Review 53 (04):147-.
  22.  27
    Deceitful Gods.J. Tate - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (02):107-.
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  23.  34
    De Homero Philosopho.J. Tate - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (01):26-.
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  24.  26
    Dead or alive?: Reflective versus unreflective traditions.John W. Tate - 1997 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (4):71-91.
    The Enlightenment heritage has meant that we have tended to conceive of tradition as inevitably opposed to reason, and that the exten sion of one as a major constitutive element in social affairs, implies the retraction of the other. However, this paper attempts to conceive the relationship between tradition and reason in a more articulated context, suggesting that this dichotomy between reason and tradition may itself be what Hans-Georg Gadamer calls an 'Enlightenment prejudice'. By drawing on the work of thinkers (...)
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  25.  22
    Epic and Archaic.J. Tate - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (3-4):146-.
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  26.  32
    Free speech or equal respect?: Liberalism's competing values.John William Tate - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (9):987-1020.
    This article looks at liberalism as a political tradition encompassing competing and, at times, incommensurable values. It looks in particular at the potential conflict between the values of free speech and equal respect. Both of these are foundational values for liberalism, in the sense that they arise as normative ideals from the very inception of the liberal tradition itself. Yet from the perspective of this tradition, it is by no means clear which of these values should be prioritized in those (...)
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  27.  29
    Friedrich Zugker: Isocrates' Panathenaikos. Pp. 30. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1954, Paper, DM. 1.50.J. Tate - 1956 - The Classical Review 6 (02):166-.
  28.  22
    Greek Civilization.J. Tate - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (02):151-.
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  29.  13
    Guest Editorial: Ecology and the economy.James Tate - 2010 - Synesis: A Journal of Science, Technology, Ethics, and Policy 1 (1):T1 - T2.
  30.  30
    Gunnar Rudberg: Platonica Selecta. Pp. 141. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1956. Paper, Kr. 9.75.J. Tate - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (3-4):281-.
  31.  22
    Greek Theology.J. Tate - 1956 - The Classical Review 6 (02):119-.
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  32.  27
    Horace and the Moral Function of Poetry.J. Tate - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (2):65-72.
    The modern admirers of Horace who take him seriously as a moralist are inclined to attribute an undue degree of originality to his views on the moral function of poetry. The conception of the poet as teacher was, of course, the traditional Greek view. But Professor A. Y. Campbell thinks—in spite of ‘passages from Strabo and Plutarch’ —that this conception ‘after the days of Plato and Aristophanes lapsed as completely as did the production of the sort of literature that had (...)
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  33.  21
    Horace, Epistles I. XIX. 6.J. Tate - 1927 - The Classical Review 41 (06):218-.
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  34.  16
    Habermas for humanists.Jeffrey L. Tate - 2007 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 15 (1):59-76.
    An exploration of how the writings of Jürgen Habermas lend philosophical support to the universal validity of reason, thus reinforcing the foundation of humanism.
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  35.  38
    H. G. Gadamer: Plato und die Dichter. Pp. 36. Frankfurt am Main: Klostermann, 1934. Paper, RM. 1.75.J. Tate - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (04):147-.
  36.  44
    H. L. Davids: De Gnomologieēn van Sint Gregorius van Nazianze. Pp. 164. Nijmegen: Dekker en Van de Vegt, 1940. Paper.J. Tate - 1940 - The Classical Review 54 (02):114-.
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  37.  56
    Horace rendered in English Verse. By Alexander Falconer Murison. Pp. 430. London: Longmans, 1931. Cloth, 12s. 6d. net.J. Tate - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (04):186-.
  38.  22
    K. I. Βονρβέρης: Πλάτων καὶΆθ ναι. Pp. 237. Athens, 1950. Paper.J. Tate - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (02):109-.
  39.  28
    K. I. Boypbephσ: ΄Η έθνική συνείδησις το Πλάτωνος. Pp. 31. Athens, 1939. Paper.J. Tate - 1940 - The Classical Review 54 (02):113-.
  40.  32
    K. I. Boypbephσ: Κράτος καί παιδεία κατὰ τόυ Πλάτωυα Pp. 31. Athens, 1939. Paper.J. Tate - 1940 - The Classical Review 54 (02):113-.
  41.  26
    Konst. I. Vourveris: Φιλολογίαα ώςc Πνενματική Επιστήμη Pp. 112. Athens, 1952. Paper.J. Tate - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (02):160-.
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  42.  24
    Károly Marót: A görög irodalom kezdetei. Pp. 376: 12 plates. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1956. Cloth, 50 f.J. Tate - 1957 - The Classical Review 7 (3-4):259-.
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  43.  78
    Locke and toleration: Defending Locke’s liberal credentials.John William Tate - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (7):761-791.
    This article challenges the claim that John Locke’s arguments for toleration are fundamentally at odds with any we might now associate with the liberal tradition. By showing how this perspective fundamentally misreads Locke on toleration, it seeks to defend Locke’s own status as one of the founding fathers of the liberal tradition.
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  44.  9
    Liberty, governance and resistance: competing discourses in John Locke's political philosophy.John William Tate - 2023 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    John Locke is widely perceived as a foundational figure within the liberal tradition. This book investigates the competing purposes that informed Locke's political philosophy, not all of which resulted in outcomes consistent with what we today understand as "liberal" ideals. Locke himself was unaware that he belonged to a "liberal" tradition. Traditions only acquire meaning in retrospect. But many have perceived the development of Locke's political philosophy as involving a smooth evolution from "authoritarian" origins to "liberal" conclusions, beginning with Locke's (...)
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  45.  16
    Liberty, Toleration and Equality: John Locke, Jonas Proast and the Letters Concerning Toleration.John William Tate - 2016 - Routledge.
    The seventeenth century English philosopher, John Locke, is widely recognized as one of the seminal sources of the modern liberal tradition. _Liberty, Toleration and Equality_ examines the development of Locke’s ideal of toleration, from its beginnings, to the culmination of this development in Locke’s fifteen year debate with his great antagonist, the Anglican clergyman, Jonas Proast. Locke, like Proast, was a sincere Christian, but unlike Proast, Locke was able to develop, over time, a perspective on toleration which allowed him to (...)
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  46.  35
    More Greek for 'Atheism.'.J. Tate - 1937 - The Classical Review 51 (01):3-6.
  47.  57
    Plato, Art and Mr. Maritain.J. Tate - 1938 - New Scholasticism 12 (2):107-142.
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  48.  32
    Plato and Freud.J. Tate - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (02):78-.
  49.  18
    Poetry and History.J. Tate - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (3-4):254-.
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  50.  31
    Pindar and Plato.J. Tate - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (01):17-.
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