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  1.  25
    Plato's Earlier Dialectic. By R. Robinson. 2nd Edition. Pp. X + 286. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953. 25s. [REVIEW]J. Tate & R. Robinson - 1955 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:168-169.
  2.  42
    Plato and Allegorical Interpretation.J. Tate - 1929 - Classical Quarterly 23 (3-4):142-.
    Allegorical interpretation of the ancient Greek myths began not with the grammarians, but with the philosophers. As speculative thought developed, there grew up also the belief that in mystical and symbolic terms the ancient poets had expressed profound truths which were difficult to define in scientifically exact language. Assuming that the myth-makers were concerned to edify and to instruct, the philosophers found in apparent immoralities and impieties a warning that both in offensive and in inoffensive passages one must look beneath (...)
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  3.  73
    ‘Imitation’ in Plato's Republic.J. Tate - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (1):16-23.
    It has become a standing reproach upon Plato's treatment of poetry in the Republic that he forgets or misrepresents in the tenth book what he said in the third. According to the earlier discussion, poetry is required to perform important services in the ideal state; its subject-matter will make the young familiar with true doctrines ; its style will reflect the qualities proper to the character of guardian, and therefore—by the principle of imitation—induce and confirm such qualities in the souls (...)
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  4.  70
    Plato and 'Imitation.'.J. Tate - 1932 - Classical Quarterly 26 (3-4):161-.
    In C.Q., January, 1928, pp. 16 sqq., I examined afresh the two discussions of poetry as imitation which are found in Plato's Republic. I pointed out that Plato used the term ‘imitation’ in two senses, a good and a bad. The only kind of poetry which Plato excludes from his ideal state is that which is imitative in the bad sense of the term. He admits, and indeed welcomes, that kind of poetry which is imitative in the good sense , (...)
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  5.  22
    The Interpretation of Plato's Republic. By N. R. Murphy. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1951. Pp. Vii + 247. 18s.J. Tate & N. R. Murphy - 1954 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:200-201.
  6.  15
    Plato and Allegorical Interpretation.J. Tate - 1930 - Classical Quarterly 24 (1):1-10.
    It is clear, then, that Plato's strictures on Homer ought not to have given any encouragement to allegorical interpretation. The eulogists of Homer ought to have sought other grounds for the defence which he invited them to make; while the allegorizing philosophers, if they persisted in treating interpretation of the poets as an instrument of knowledge, ought to have answered Plato not by multiplying allegories but by producing a defence of the allegorical method. The question with which we are concerned (...)
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  7.  33
    Locke, Toleration and Natural Law: A Reassessment.John William Tate - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory 16 (1).
    There is an increasingly prevalent view among some contemporary Locke scholars that Locke's political philosophy is thoroughly subordinate to theological imperatives, centered on natural law. This article challenges this point of view by critically evaluating this interpretation of Locke as advanced by some of its leading proponents. This interpretation perceives natural law as the governing principle of Locke's political philosophy, and the primary source of transition and reconciliation within it. This article advances a very different reading of Locke's political philosophy, (...)
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  8.  16
    The FairWear Campaign: An Ethical Network in the Australian Garment Industry.Rosaria Burchielli, Annie Delaney, Jane Tate & Kylie Coventry - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):575 - 588.
    In many parts of the world, homework is a form of labour characterised by precariousness, lack of regulation, and invisibility and lack of protection of the workers who are often amongst the world's poorest and most exploited. Homework is spreading, due to firm practices such as outsourcing. The analysis and understanding of complex corporate networks may assist with the identification and protection of those most at risk within the supply chain network. It can also expose some of the key ethical (...)
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  9.  15
    On the History of Allegorism.J. Tate - 1934 - Classical Quarterly 28 (02):105-.
    I have shown in an earlier article that from the second half of the fifth century onwards the desire to defend Homer and Hesiod against accusations of immorality was certainly not the main motive which actuated the allegorical interpreters of the early poets. That desire, no doubt, existed; but the part which it played was wholly a subordinate one. In the present article I propose first to consider allegorism in its earlier stages, and to state my case for holding that (...)
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  10.  56
    Locke, God, and Civil Society.John William Tate - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (2):222-228.
    Timothy Stanton is the latest in a line of Locke scholars who, in focusing on Locke's theological commitments, have sought to place these at the center of his political philosophy. Stanton insists that those who interpret Locke's political philosophy in more material terms, centered on individual liberty, government authority, and the need to reconcile both via consent, apply to it a misleading "picture" and fail to perceive its essentials. By showing that this is precisely how Locke himself intended his political (...)
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  11.  39
    The Beginnings of Greek Allegory.J. Tate - 1927 - The Classical Review 41 (6):214-215.
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  12. Book Review: 50 Ways to Help Save the Earth: How You and Your Church Can Make a Difference50 Ways to Help Save the Earth: How You and Your Church Can Make a Difference by Barnes-DaviesRebeccaWestminster John Knox, Louisville, 2009, 127 Pp. $14.95. ISBN 978-0-664-23370-9. [REVIEW]Jessica Tate - 2011 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 65 (2):221-221.
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  13.  29
    Dividing Locke From God: The Limits of Theology in Locke’s Political Philosophy.John William Tate - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (2):133-164.
    A “recent consensus” has emerged in Locke studies that has sought to place theology at the center of Locke's political philosophy, insisting that the validity and cogency of Locke's political conclusions cannot be substantiated independently of the theology that resides at their foundation. This paper argues for the need to distance Locke from God, claiming that not only can we “bracket” the normative conclusions of Locke's political philosophy from their theological foundations, but that this was in fact Locke's own intention, (...)
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  14.  39
    The Hermeneutic Circle Vs. The Enlightenment.John W. Tate - 1998 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1998 (110):9-38.
  15.  82
    Free Speech or Equal Respect?: Liberalism's Competing Values.John William Tate - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (9):987-1020.
    This article looks at liberalism as a political tradition encompassing competing and, at times, incommensurable values. It looks in particular at the potential conflict between the values of free speech and equal respect. Both of these are foundational values for liberalism, in the sense that they arise as normative ideals from the very inception of the liberal tradition itself. Yet from the perspective of this tradition, it is by no means clear which of these values should be prioritized in those (...)
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  16.  31
    W. Vollgraff: L'Oraison Funébre de Gorgias. Pp. 175. Leiden: Brill, 1952. Paper, 23 Gld.J. Tate - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (3-4):290-291.
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  17.  81
    Ruth 1:6–22.Jessica Tate - 2010 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 64 (2):170-172.
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  18.  59
    ‘Play’ in Plato - G. J. De Vries: Spel Bij Plato. Pp. 391. Amsterdam: N. V. Noord-Hollandsche Uitgevers Mij., 1949. Cloth, Fl. 9.50. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1950 - The Classical Review 64 (3-4):111-112.
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  19.  83
    Antonio Tovar: Aristoteles, Retorica. Edición del texto con aparato crítico, traducción, prólogo y notas. Pp. xlviii+245. Madrid: Instituto de Estudios Políticos, 1953. Paper, 100 ptas. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (02):198-.
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  20.  9
    The Hermeneutic Circle Vs. The Enlightenment.J. W. Tate - 1998 - Télos 1998 (110):9-38.
  21.  73
    Greek Particles J. D. Denniston: The Greek Particles. Second Edition. Pp. Lxxxii + 658. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1954. Cloth, 505. Net. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1956 - The Classical Review 6 (02):125-126.
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  22.  14
    Socrates and the Myths.J. Tate - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (02):74-.
    In Plato's Euthyphro two suggestions are offered to account for the accusation of impiety brought against Socrates. The first comes from Euthyphro , who takes it that the accusation is directed primarily against Socrates' ‘divine sign.’ The second is made by Socrates himself , who puts forward the view that he is being brought to trial because he refuses to accept such tales about the gods as Hesiod told regarding the maltreatment of Uranus by Cronus and of Cronus by Zeus—tales (...)
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  23.  7
    On the History of Allegorism.J. Tate - 1934 - Classical Quarterly 28 (2):105-114.
    I have shown in an earlier article that from the second half of the fifth century onwards the desire to defend Homer and Hesiod against accusations of immorality was certainly not the main motive which actuated the allegorical interpreters of the early poets. That desire, no doubt, existed; but the part which it played was wholly a subordinate one. In the present article I propose first to consider allegorism in its earlier stages, and to state my case for holding that (...)
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  24.  71
    L. J. Potts: Aristotle On the Art of Fiction. An English Translation of The Poetics with an Introductory Essay and Explanatory Notes. Pp. 94. Cambridge: University Press, 1953. Paper, 6s. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (02):197-.
  25.  58
    Moira William Chase Greene: Moira: Fate, Good, and Evil in Greek Thought. Pp. Viii+450. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Milford), 1944. Cloth, $5.00. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1945 - The Classical Review 59 (01):12-14.
  26.  47
    Horace Rendered in English Verse. By Alexander Falconer Murison. Pp. 430. London: Longmans, 1931. Cloth, 12s. 6d. Net.J. Tate - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (04):186-.
  27.  30
    Pythagoreans in Italy. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1942 - The Classical Review 56 (2):74-75.
  28.  57
    Plato's Dialectic Julius Stenzel: Plato's Method of Dialectic. Translated and Edited by D.J. Allan. Pp. Xliii+170. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1940. Cloth, 10s. 6d. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1940 - The Classical Review 54 (03):143-144.
  29.  29
    The Life and Times of Synesius of Cyrene as Revealed in His Works. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1941 - The Classical Review 55 (1):52-52.
  30.  62
    W. J. Verdenius: Mimesis. Plato's Doctrine of Artistic Imitation and its Meaning to Us. Pp. 50. Leiden: Brill, 1949. Paper, 2.30 G. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (3-4):227-.
  31.  56
    Paideia II Werner Jaeger: Paideia. The Ideals of Greek Culture. Translated From the German Manuscript by Gilbert Highet. Volume II. In Search of the Divine Centre. Pp. Xv+442. Oxford: Blackwell, 1944. Cloth, 22s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1945 - The Classical Review 59 (2):54-56.
  32.  57
    Locke and Toleration: Defending Locke’s Liberal Credentials.John William Tate - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (7):761-791.
    This article challenges the claim that John Locke’s arguments for toleration are fundamentally at odds with any we might now associate with the liberal tradition. By showing how this perspective fundamentally misreads Locke on toleration, it seeks to defend Locke’s own status as one of the founding fathers of the liberal tradition.
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  33.  54
    Aristotle on Plato Harold Cherniss, Aristotle's Criticism of Plato and the Academy, Vol. I. Pp. Xxvi+610. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1944. Cloth, $5.00 (33S. 6d.). [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1946 - The Classical Review 60 (01):32-33.
  34.  41
    A Turning-Point in Plato C. J. De Vogel: Een Keerpunt in Plato's Denken. Pp. Viii+266. Amsterdam: H. J. Paris, 1936. Paper, Fl. 4.25. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (06):220-.
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  35.  51
    Plato, Art and Mr. Maritain.J. Tate - 1938 - New Scholasticism 12 (2):107-142.
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  36.  3
    Liberty, Toleration and Equality: John Locke, Jonas Proast and the Letters Concerning Toleration.John Tate - 2016 - Routledge.
    The seventeenth century English philosopher, John Locke, is widely recognized as one of the seminal sources of the modern liberal tradition. _Liberty, Toleration and Equality_ examines the development of Locke’s ideal of toleration, from its beginnings, to the culmination of this development in Locke’s fifteen year debate with his great antagonist, the Anglican clergyman, Jonas Proast. Locke, like Proast, was a sincere Christian, but unlike Proast, Locke was able to develop, over time, a perspective on toleration which allowed him to (...)
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  37. Psalm 72:1–7, 10–14.Jessica Tate - 2014 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 68 (1):66-68.
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  38.  52
    Omero, Odissea, libro VI, con introduzione, commento e indici analitici di Antonio Giusti. Pp. vii + 70. Turin: Lattes, 1938. Paper, L. 5. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (05):197-.
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  39.  54
    S. H. Butcher: Aristotle's Theory of Poetry and Fine Art, with a Critical Text and Translation of The Poetics, With a Prefatory Essay on Aristotelian Literary Criticism by John Gassner. Pp. Lxxvi+421. New York: Dover Publications, 1951. Paper. 1.95. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1956 - The Classical Review 6 (02):166-.
  40.  50
    A New Translation of the Republic Francis Macdonald Cornford: The Republic of Plato Translated with Introduction and Notes. Pp. Xxvii + 356. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1941. Cloth, 7s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1942 - The Classical Review 56 (03):117-118.
  41.  49
    The Philebus R. Hackforth. Plato's Examination of Pleasure. A Translation of the Philebus, with Introduction and Commentary. Pp. Vi+143. Cambridge: University Press, 1945. Cloth, 10s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1946 - The Classical Review 60 (01):29-30.
  42.  35
    Medieval Platonism - Paul Oskar Kristeller: The Philosophy of Marsilio Ficino. Pp. Xiv+441. New York: Columbia University Press , 1943. Cloth, 30s. Net. - Mediaeval and Renaissance Studies. Edited by R. Hunt and R. Klibansky. Vol. I, No. 2. London: Warburg Institute. Paper, 18s. Net. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1944 - The Classical Review 58 (02):66-.
  43.  53
    Plato's Phaedrus. Translated, with an Introduction, by W. C. Helmbold and W. G. Rabinowitz. Pp. Xvii + 75. New York: Liberal Arts Press, 1956. Paper, 60c. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (01):81-82.
  44.  50
    Plato's Statesman J. B. Skemp: Plato's Statesman. A Translation of the Politicus of Plato, with Introductory Essays and Footnotes. Pp. 244. London: Routledge, 1952. Cloth, 28s. Net. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (02):115-117.
  45.  45
    Plato's Political Philosophy K. R. Popper: The Open Society and its Enemies. Vol. I: The Spell of Plato. Vol. Ii: The High Tide of Prophecy: Hegel, Marx, and the Aftermath. Pp. Xi+322; V+391. London: Routledge, 1957. Cloth, £2. 10s. Net. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (3-4):241-242.
  46.  45
    Plato's Myths Paul Stöcklein: Ueber die philosophische Bedeutung von Platons Mythen. Pp. 58. [Philologus Supplementband XXX, 3.] Leipzig: Dieterich, 1937. Paper, M. 4.50. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (01):13-.
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  47.  20
    Analysis of Current Thyroid Function Test Ordering Practices.Joseph K. Kluesner, Darrick J. Beckman, Joshua M. Tate, Alexis A. Beauvais, Maria I. Kravchenko, Jana L. Wardian, Sky D. Graybill, Jeffrey A. Colburn, Irene Folaron & Mark W. True - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (2):347-352.
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  48.  44
    Two Translations of Plato (1) Plato, Protagoras and Meno. A New Translation by W. K. C. Guthrie. Pp. 157. West Drayton: Penguin Books, 1956. Paper, 2s. 6d. Net. (2) Plato's Protagoras. Jowett's Translation Extensively Revised by M. Ostwald. Edited with an Introduction by G. Vlastos. Pp. Lviii + 69. New York: Liberal Arts Press, 1956. Paper, 75 C. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (01):35-37.
  49.  36
    Socrates in Refraction V. De Magalhães-Vilhena: (I) Le Problemè de Socrate: Le Socrate Historique Et le Socrate de Platan. Pp. 568. (2) Socrate Et la Lègende Platonicienne. Pp. 235. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1952. Paper, 1900, 1000 Fr. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (01):56-58.
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  50.  42
    Antiphon's First Speech Simon Wijnberg: Antiphon's Eerste Rede, Met Vertaling En Commentaar. Pp. 162. Amsterdam: H. J. Paris, 1938. Paper. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1940 - The Classical Review 54 (01):20-21.
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