Results for 'J. VanderMeersch'

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  1.  22
    Boekbesprekingen.P. Huizing, J. Beyer, A. van Kol, S. Trooster, P. Fransen, F. De Raedemaeker, H. Geurtsen, J. De Munter, J. Nota, P. de Bruin, L. Steins Bisschop, M. De Tollenaere, A. Poncelet, W. Couturier, L. Vander Kerken, A. Snoeck, F. Malmberg, A. Kuylaars, A. Raignier, Fr Elliot, E. Huffer, M. Dierickx, J. Rupert, R. Leijs, J. Houben, J. VanderMeersch, E. J. Vandenbussche, J. De Fraine, I. de la Potterie, P. Smulders, P. Ploumen, J. Van Torre, H. Somers, C. Sträter & E. Vandenbussche - 1952 - Bijdragen 13 (1):76-116.
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  2.  8
    Boekbesprekingen.P. Smulders, P. Fransen, C. Sträter, Ch Martin, J. Van Torre, J. Houben, J. Vandermeersch, A. Snoeck & E. Vandenbussche - 1950 - Bijdragen 11 (2):187-200.
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  3. Vandermeersch, P. en Westerink, H., Godsdienstpsychologie in cultuurhistorisch perspectief.J. Maeyaert - 2008 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 70 (1):161.
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  4.  42
    J.S. Mill on Plural Voting, Competence and Participation.J. J. Miller - 2003 - History of Political Thought 24 (4):647-667.
    J.S. Mill's plural voting proposal in Considerations on Representative Government presents political theorists with a puzzle: the elitist proposal that some individuals deserve a greater voice than others seems at odds with Mill's repeated arguments for the value of full participation in government. This essay looks at Mill's arguments for plural voting, arguing that, far from being motivated solely by elitism, Mill's account is actually driven by a commitment to both competence and participation. It goes on to argue that, for (...)
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  5.  32
    Surveillance, Freedom and the Republic.J. Matthew Hoye & Jeffrey Monaghan - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory 17 (3):343-363.
    Arbitrary state and corporate powers are helping to turn the Internet into a global surveillance dragnet. Responses to this novel form of power have been tepid and ineffective. Liberal critiques of surveillance are constrained by their focus on privacy, security and the underlying presupposition that freedom consists only of freedom from interference. By contrast, Foucauldian critiques rejecting liberalism have been well rewarded analytically, but have proven incapable of addressing normative questions regarding the relationship between surveillance and freedom. Quite apart from (...)
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  6.  63
    Compromise: J. P. Day.J. P. Day - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (250):471-485.
    Human conflict and its resolution is obviously a subject of great practical importance. Equally obviously, it is a vast subject, ranging from total war at one end of the spectrum to negotiated settlement at its other end. The literature on the subject is correspondingly vast and, in recent times, technical, thanks to the valuable contributions made to it by game theorists, economists, and writers on industrial and international relations. In this essay, however, I shall discuss only one familiar form of (...)
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  7. Situated Learning in Communities of Practice. Resnick, L., Levine, J., Teasley, S., Eds.J. Lave - 1991 - In Lauren Resnick, Levine B., M. John, Stephanie Teasley & D. (eds.), Perspectives on Socially Shared Cognition. American Psychological Association.
     
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  8. Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’T Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”.J. Kevin O’Regan & Ned Block - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of Philosophy and (...)
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  9.  11
    J. Wilson and B. Cowell on the Democratic Myth.J. M. Tarrant - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 18 (1):123–127.
  10.  40
    J. G. Fichte: Three Arguments For Idealism.J. Douglas Rabb - 1976 - Idealistic Studies 6 (2):169-177.
    John Lachs in his paper, “Fichte’s Idealism,” suggests that he can detect in Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre “three major lines of argument for his idealistic conclusion.” Lachs examines each of these arguments in turn and concludes that the first “appears … to have no merit.” The second has nothing to recommend it; and the third simply “begs the question.” I wish to argue that much of Lachs’ criticism simply misses its mark. First, Lachs presents each argument independently, as if it were meant (...)
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  11.  61
    Explanation—Opening Address: J. J. C. Smart.J. J. C. Smart - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:1-19.
    It is a pleasure for me to give this opening address to the Royal Institute of Philosophy Conference on ‘Explanation’ for two reasons. The first is that it is succeeded by exciting symposia and other papers concerned with various special aspects of the topic of explanation. The second is that the conference is being held in my old alma mater , the University of Glasgow, where I did my first degree. Especially due to C. A. Campbell and George Brown there (...)
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  12.  87
    J. L. Bell, A Primer of Infinitesimal Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998, Cloth £19.95. ISBN: 0 521 62401 0.J. P. Mayberry - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (2):339-345.
  13.  15
    J. G. Fichte: Three Arguments For Idealism.J. Douglas Rabb - 1976 - Idealistic Studies 6 (2):169-177.
    John Lachs in his paper, “Fichte’s Idealism,” suggests that he can detect in Fichte’s Wissenschaftslehre “three major lines of argument for his idealistic conclusion.” Lachs examines each of these arguments in turn and concludes that the first “appears … to have no merit.” The second has nothing to recommend it; and the third simply “begs the question.” I wish to argue that much of Lachs’ criticism simply misses its mark. First, Lachs presents each argument independently, as if it were meant (...)
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  14.  86
    J. L. Austin.G. J. Warnock - 1989 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  15. J. L. Austin.J. O. Urmson - 1965 - Journal of Philosophy 62 (19):499.
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  16. J. L. Austin.J. O. Urmson & G. J. Warnock - 1961 - Mind 70 (278):256-257.
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  17. Historiography and Enlightenment: A View of Their History: J. G. A. Pocock.J. G. A. Pocock - 2008 - Modern Intellectual History 5 (1):83-96.
    This essay is written on the following premises and argues for them. “Enlightenment” is a word or signifier, and not a single or unifiable phenomenon which it consistently signifies. There is no single or unifiable phenomenon describable as “the Enlightenment,” but it is the definite article rather than the noun which is to be avoided. In studying the intellectual history of the late seventeenth century and the eighteenth, we encounter a variety of statements made, and assumptions proposed, to which the (...)
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  18. The Incentivized Action View of Institutional Facts as an Alternative to the Searlean View: A Response to Butchard and D’Amico.J. P. Smit, Filip Buekens & Stan du Plessis - 2016 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 46 (1):44-55.
    In our earlier work, we argued, contra Searle, that institutional facts can be understood in terms of non-institutional facts about actions and incentives. Butchard and D’Amico claim that we have misinterpreted Searle, that our main argument against him has no merit and that our positive view cannot account for institutional facts created via joint action. We deny all three charges.
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  19.  12
    Dignity in Long-Term Care.J. Kane & K. de Vries - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (6):744-751.
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  20.  12
    An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation. By J. W. Robson.J. W. Robson - 1947 - Ethics 58 (2):140-143.
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  21.  14
    Le néoconfucianisme au crible de la philosophie analytique.Léon Vandermeersch - 2007 - Archives de Philosophie 3 (3):471-486.
    Feng Youlan , auteur d’une célèbre Histoire de la philosophie chinoise , a voulu refonder le néoconfucianisme de Zhu Xi en l’accordant à la philosophie analytique. Son Traité de l’Homme est une phénoménologie de la conscience individuelle, décrite dans chacune des quatre étapes de son ascension vers la sainteté : la conscience naturelle, forme originelle de l’être-au-monde, immédiatement présent au réel sans conscience de soi ; la conscience intéressée, qui se distancie du réel par un calcul de conduite en vue (...)
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  22.  8
    J. G. Herder on Social and Political Culture.J. G. Herder & F. M. Barnard - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    The texts collected in this volume, which was originally published in 1969, contain Herder's most original and stimulating ideas on politics, history and language. They had for the most part not been previously available in English. In his introduction, Professor Barnard analyses the basic premises of Herder's political thought against the background of the Enlightenment. He examines Herder's concepts of language, community and culture, his theory of historical interaction, and his approach to the problem of change and progress. Finally, he (...)
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  23.  37
    J.J. Winkler, F.I. Zeitlin (Edd.): Nothing to Do with Dionysos?. Athenian Drama in its Social Context. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1990. [REVIEW]J. Wilkins - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):56-58.
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  24.  86
    Luck and Equality: Richard J. Arneson.Richard J. Arneson - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):73–90.
  25.  48
    Realism V. Idealism: J. J. C. Smart.J. J. C. Smart - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (237):295-312.
    It is characteristic of realists to separate ontology from epistemology and of idealists to mix the two things up. By ‘idealists’ here I am mainly referring to the British neo-Hegelians but the charge of mixing up ontology and epistemology can be made against at least one ‘subjective idealist’, namely Bishop Berkeley, as his wellknown dictum ‘esse ispercipi’ testifies. The objective idealists rejected the correspondence theory of truth and on the whole accepted a coherence theory. The qualification is needed here because (...)
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  26.  44
    Technē and Moral Expertise: J. E. Tiles.J. Tiles - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (227):49-66.
    While it is generally accepted that we need to use our intelligence in order to get what we want, it is thought to be a cardinal error to imagine that by reasoning we can discover what we ought to want. Reason can in no way constrain the choice of ends, it can only constrain the choice of means once an end has been adopted. In Plato's philosophy we find a view strongly opposed to this attitude towards reason. It is widely (...)
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  27.  91
    Primates, Hominids, and Humans—From Species Specificity to Human Uniqueness? A Response to Barbara J. King, Gregory R. Peterson, Wesley J. Wildman, and Nancy R. Howell. [REVIEW]J. Wentzel van Huyssteen - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):505-525.
    In this response to essays by Barbara J. King, Gregory R. Peterson, Wesley J. Wildman, and Nancy R. Howell, I present arguments to counter some of the exciting and challenging questions from my colleagues. I take the opportunity to restate my argument for an interdisciplinary public theology, and by further developing the notion of transversality I argue for the specificity of the emerging theological dialogue with paleoanthropology and primatology. By arguing for a hermeneutics of the body, I respond to criticism (...)
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  28.  91
    Primates and Religion: A Biological Anthropologist's Response to J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen's Alone in the World?Barbara J. King - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):451-466.
    For a biological anthropologist interested in the prehistory of religion, J. Wentzel van Huyssteen's book is welcome and resonant. Van Huyssteen's central thesis is that humans' capacity for spirituality emerges from a transformation of cognition and emotions that takes place in the symbolic realm, within Homo sapiens and apart from biology. To his thesis I bring to bear three areas of response: the abundant cognitive and emotional capacities of living apes and extinct hominids; the role of symbolic ritual in the (...)
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  29.  60
    Reincarnation and Relativized Identity1: J. J. MACINTOSH.J. J. MacIntosh - 1989 - Religious Studies 25 (2):153-165.
    There are five main claims that may be made about life after death: We are reincarnated in the self-same body we had in life. We are reincarnated in another body. We are revived, or continue to live in a disembodied form.
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  30.  93
    Nature and Natural Authority in Bentham*: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (2):209-219.
    My object in this paper is to suggest a few reflections on some themes in Bentham's work which others as well as I have noted, without perhaps developing them as fully as might with advantage be done. There will be nothing like full development in the limited compass of what is said here, but what is said may at least indicate possible directions for further exploration. The greater part of the paper will be concerned with the notion of natural authority; (...)
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  31. LUKASIEWICZ, J. -Aristotle's Syllogistic, From the Standpoint of Modern Formal Logic. [REVIEW]J. L. Austin - 1952 - Mind 61:395.
     
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  32. Response to Tucker on Hiddenness: J. L. SCHELLENBERG.J. L. Schellenberg - 2008 - Religious Studies 44 (3):289-293.
    Chris Tucker's paper on the hiddenness argument seeks to turn aside a way of defending the latter which he calls the value argument. But the value argument can withstand Tucker's criticisms. In any case, an alternative argument capable of doing the same job is suggested by his own emphasis on free will.
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  33.  51
    J. VUILLEMIN: “Nécessité ou contingence, l’aporie de Diodore et les systèmes philosophiques”; Paris, Fondation Singer-Polignac et les Editions de Minuit, 1984, 446 p.J. Goffi - 1987 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 30 (1):173-178.
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  34.  74
    God, Hume and Natural Belief: J. C. A. Gaskin.J. C. A. Gaskin - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (189):281-294.
    Hume's doctrine of natural belief allows that certain beliefs are justifiably held by all men without regard to the quality of the evidence which may be produced in their favour. Examples are belief in an external world and belief in the veracity of our senses. According to R. J. Butler, Hume argues in the Dialogues that belief in God is of this sort. More recently John Hick has argued that for some people it is as natural to believe in God (...)
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  35.  33
    J OHN V. P ICKSTONE, Ways of Knowing: A New History of Science, Technology and Medicine. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000; Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2001. Pp. Xii+273. ISBN 0-226-66795-2. £14.00, $27.50. [REVIEW]J. R. R. Christie - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Science 38 (3):350-351.
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  36.  4
    J.L. Mehta on Heidegger, Hermeneutics and Indian Tradition.William J. Jackson (ed.) - 1992 - Brill.
    In these essays, J.L. Mehta, Indian philosopher in whose life and work East and West met profoundly, reflects on the origins and potency of modern hermeneutics and phenomenology, and applies the principles of interpretation to Hindu traditions. These farseeing essays show a hopeful way for non-Western cultures to gain insight into the basic presuppositions of the Western world, and to reclaim their own origins and ways of thinking, and to participate in an emerging planetary thinking.
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  37.  80
    Utilitarianism and Reform: Social Theory and Social Change, 1750–1800*: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (2):211-225.
    The object of this article is to examine, with the work of Jeremy Bentham as the principal example, one strand in the complex pattern of European social theory during the second half of the eighteenth century. This was of course the period not only of the American and French revolutions, but of the culmination of the movements of thought constituting what we know as the Enlightenment. Like all great historical episodes, the Enlightenment was both the fulfilment of long-established processes and (...)
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  38.  14
    Martin J.S. Rudwick. The Great Devonian Controversy: The Shaping of Scientific Knowledge Among Gentlemanly Specialists. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1985. Pp. Xxxiii + 494. ISBN 0-226-73101-4. £36.75. [REVIEW]J. Morrell - 1987 - British Journal for the History of Science 20 (1):88-89.
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  39.  4
    J.A. Hobson: A Reader.J. A. Hobson - 1988 - Allen & Unwin.
  40. Beyond the Gap: An Introduction to Naturalizing Phenomenology in Petitot J., Varela JF, Pachoud B., Roy JM.J. Petitot - 1999 - In Jean Petitot, Franscisco J. Varela, Barnard Pacoud & Jean-Michel Roy (eds.), Naturalizing Phenomenology. Stanford University Press.
  41.  94
    Voluntarism and the Origins of Utilitarianism: J. B. Schneewind.J. B. Schneewind - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (1):87-96.
    In the paper I offer a brief sketch of one of the sources of utilitarianism. Our biological ancestry is a matter of fact that is not altered by the way we describe ourselves. With philosophical theories it is otherwise. Utilitarianism can be described in ways that make it look as if it is as old as moral philosophy – as J. S. Mill thought it was. For my historical purposes, it is more useful to have an account that brings out (...)
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  42.  25
    J. L. Austin.David Holdcroft & G. J. Warnock - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):522.
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  43.  36
    C. A. J. COADY, "Testimony: A Philosophical Study".J. L. Gorman & C. A. J. Coady - 1994 - History and Theory 33 (2):230.
  44.  58
    Human Agency: Language, Duty, and Value : Philosophical Essays in Honor of J.O. Urmson.J. Dancy, J. M. E. Moravcsik & C. C. W. Taylor (eds.) - 1988 - Stanford University Press.
    Language, Duty, and Value Jonathan Dancy, J. M. E. Moravcsik James Opie Urmson, Edited by Jonathan Dancy, J. M. E. Moravcsik, and C. C. W. Taylor. reasons in general. This is freedom in the sense of acting on reasons, yet not those ...
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  45.  5
    J. Monod, S, Spiegelman and Enzymatic Adaptation. Research Programs, Local Cultures, and Disciplinary Traditions.J. P. Gaudillière - 1992 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 14 (1):23.
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  46.  39
    Ethics and Science: J. J. C. Smart.J. J. C. Smart - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (218):449-465.
    It has frequently been lamented that while the human species has made immense progress in science it is nevertheless ethically backward. This ethical backwardness is all the more dangerous because the advanced state of scientific knowledge has made available a technology with which we are able to destroy ourselves—indeed a technology which may have got so much out of hand that we may not even have the capacity to prevent it from destroying us.
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  47.  34
    Against Equality Again: J. R. Lucas.J. R. Lucas - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (201):255-280.
    Equality in the present age has become an idol, in much the same way as property was in the age of Locke. Many people worship it, and think that it provides the key to the proper understanding of politics, and that on it alone can a genuinely just society be reconstructed. This is a mistake. Although, like property, it is a useful concept, and although, like property, there are occasions when we want to have it in practice, it is not (...)
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  48. Philosophical Papers. Edited by J.O. Urmson and G.J. Warnock. --.J. L. Austin - 1970 - Oxford University Press.
  49.  43
    Willing the Law J. David Velleman.J. David Velleman - 2004 - In Peter Baumann & Monika Betzler (eds.), Practical Conflicts: New Philosophical Essays. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 27.
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  50. F.J.J. Buytendijk's Concept of an Anthropological Physiology.Wim J. M. Dekkers - 1995 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1).
    In his concept of an anthropological physiology, F.J.J. Buytendijk has tried to lay down the theoretical and scientific foundations for an anthropologically-oriented medicine. The aim of anthropological physiology is to demonstrate, empirically, what being specifically human is in the most elementary physiological functions. This article contains a sketch of Buytendijk''s life and work, an overview of his philosophical-anthropological presuppositions, an outline of his idea of an anthropological physiology and medicine, and a discussion of some episternological and methodological problems. It is (...)
     
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