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  1. Video Meliora Proboque, Deteriora Sequor: Leibniz on the Intellectual Source of Sin.Jack D. Davidson - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford & Jan A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  2.  46
    Locke’s Finely Spun Liberty.Jack D. Davidson - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):203 - 227.
    Near the end of the long and often convoluted discussion of freedom in the chapter ‘Of Power’ in An Essay concerning Human Understanding, Locke states that in ‘The care of ourselves, that we mistake not imaginary for real happiness, is the necessary foundation of our liberty’. He goes on to explain that ‘we are by the necessity of preferring and pursuing true happiness as our greatest good, obliged to suspend the satisfaction of our desire in particular cases’. Locke then adds (...)
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  3. Leibniz on the Labyrinth of Freedom: Two Early Texts.Jack D. Davidson - 2003 - The Leibniz Review 13:19-43.
    Leibniz devoted immense energy and thought to questions concerning moral responsibility and human freedom. This paper examines Leibniz’s views on freedom and sin in two important early texts - “Von der Allmacht Allmacht und Allwissenheit Gottes und der Freiheit des Menschen” and “Confessio Philosophi” - as a propaedeutic to a detailed examination of the development of Leibniz’s views on freedom and sin. In particular, my aim is to see if Leibniz’s early thinking on freedom and sin in these early writings (...)
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  4.  28
    Appearances, Antirealism, and Aristotle.Jack D. Davidson - 1991 - Philosophical Studies 63 (2):147 - 166.
    Nussbaum misconstrues the difference between Plato and Aristotle over what is real for a debate over a conception of truth. She seems to mistake Aristotle's arguments against Plato' version of realism as an argument against realism per se, though the texts do not permit such a reading. She claims Aristotle is convinced that realism involves a fatal “failure of reference,” yet she produces not a single text where Aristotle is even remotely concerned about such a failure of reference given the (...)
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  5.  27
    Untying the Knot: Leibniz on God's Knowledge of Future Free Contingents.Jack D. Davidson - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (1):89 - 116.
  6.  2
    Leibniz on the Labyrinth of Freedom: Two Early Texts.Jack D. Davidson - 2003 - The Leibniz Review 13:19-43.
    Leibniz devoted immense energy and thought to questions concerning moral responsibility and human freedom. This paper examines Leibniz’s views on freedom and sin in two important early texts - “Von der Allmacht Allmacht und Allwissenheit Gottes und der Freiheit des Menschen” and “Confessio Philosophi” - as a propaedeutic to a detailed examination of the development of Leibniz’s views on freedom and sin. In particular, my aim is to see if Leibniz’s early thinking on freedom and sin in these early writings (...)
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  7. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.Jack D. Davidson - 2009 - In Graham Robert Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The History of Western Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 3--167.
     
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  8.  9
    Leibniz on Providence, Foreknowledge and Freedom.Jack D. Davidson - 1994 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Commentators have long been fascinated by the problem of freedom in Leibniz's system. Many of the recent studies begin with Leibniz's views on modality, truth, and so-called superessentialism, and then investigate whether these doctrines are compatible with freedom and contingency. There is, however, another dimension to Leibniz's thinking about freedom that has been largely overlooked in the recent literature. ;Leibniz inherited a medieval debate about God's foreknowledge of and providence over human free actions, and unlike the other great philosophers of (...)
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