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Jack Shardlow
University of Warwick
  1.  38
    Minima Sensibilia: Against the Dynamic Snapshot Model of Temporal Experience.Jack Shardlow - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):741-757.
    In our wakeful conscious lives, the experience of time and dynamic temporal phenomena—such as continuous motion and change—appears to be ubiquitous. How is it that temporality is woven into our conscious experience? Is it through perceptual experience presenting a series of instantaneous states of the world, which combine together—in a sense which would need to be specified—to give us experience of dynamic temporal phenomena? In this paper, I argue that this is not the case. -/- Several authors have recently proposed (...)
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  2.  18
    A Tale of Two Williams: James, Stern, and the Specious Present.Jack Shardlow - 2020 - Philosophical Explorations 23 (2):79-94.
    As a typical subject, you experience a variety of paradigmatically temporal phenomena. Looking out of the window in the English summer, you can see leaves swaying in the breeze and hear the pitter-patter of raindrops steadily increasing against the window. In discussions of temporal experience, and through reflecting on examples such as those offered, two phenomenological claims are widely – though not unequivocally – accepted: firstly, you perceptually experience motion and change; secondly, while more than a momentary state of affairs (...)
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  3.  22
    Consciousness, Attention, and Conscious Attention. [REVIEW]Jack Shardlow - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (7):1068-1070.
    In this book, Carlos Montemayor and Harry Haladjian present the latest empirical and theoretical work about consciousness, attention, and the relation between them. The authors argue that attention and consciousness occur largely independently of one another, and develop an original account of why attention does sometimes occur consciously.
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  4.  24
    Experiencing (in) Time.Jack Shardlow - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Warwick
    In this thesis I present a phenomenological investigation of our experience of time – of things as they fall within time – and suggest that something important goes missing in recent debates. This is the notion of a point of view. I believe that articulating the sense in which we have a point of view in time, and what this is a point of view upon, is crucial to an account of how things are for an experiencing subject. In the (...)
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  5.  61
    Exploring People’s Beliefs About the Experience of Time.Jack Shardlow, Ruth Lee, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack, Patrick Burns & Alison S. Fernandes - forthcoming - Synthese:1-23.
    Philosophical debates about the metaphysics of time typically revolve around two contrasting views of time. On the A-theory, time is something that itself undergoes change, as captured by the idea of the passage of time; on the B-theory, all there is to time is events standing in before/after or simultaneity relations to each other, and these temporal relations are unchanging. Philosophers typically regard the A-theory as being supported by our experience of time, and they take it that the B-theory clashes (...)
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  6. No Time to Move: Motion, Painting and Temporal Experience.Jack Shardlow - 2020 - Philosophy 95 (3):239 - 260.
    This paper is concerned with the senses in which paintings do and do not depict various temporal phenomena, such as motion, stasis and duration. I begin by explaining the popular – though not uncontroversial – assumption that depiction, as a pictorial form of representation, is a matter of an experiential resemblance between the pictorial representation and that which it is a depiction of. Given this assumption, I illustrate a tension between two plausible claims: that paintings do not depict motion in (...)
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