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Jacob M. Vigil [12]Jacob Miguel Vigil [5]
  1.  55
    A Socio-Relational Framework of Sex Differences in the Expression of Emotion.Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):375.
    Despite a staggering body of research demonstrating sex differences in expressed emotion, very few theoretical models (evolutionary or non-evolutionary) offer a critical examination of the adaptive nature of such differences. From the perspective of a socio-relational framework, emotive behaviors evolved to promote the attraction and aversion of different types of relationships by advertising the two most parsimonious properties of reciprocity potential, or perceived attractiveness as a prospective social partner. These are the individual's (a) perceived capacity or ability to provide expedient (...)
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  2.  50
    Asymmetries in the Friendship Preferences and Social Styles of Men and Women.Jacob M. Vigil - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (2):143-161.
    Several hypotheses on the form and function of sex differences in social behaviors were tested. The results suggest that friendship preferences in both sexes can be understood in terms of perceived reciprocity potential—capacity and willingness to engage in a mutually beneficial relationship. Divergent social styles may in turn reflect trade-offs between behaviors selected to maintain large, functional coalitions in men and intimate, secure relationships in women. The findings are interpreted from a broad socio-relational framework of the types of behaviors that (...)
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  3.  18
    Embodied Simulation and the Search for Meaning Are Not Necessary for Facial Expression Processing.Jacob M. Vigil & Patrick Coulombe - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):461 - 463.
    Embodied simulation and the epistemic motivation to search for the of other people's behaviors are not necessary for specific and functional responding to, and hence processing of, human facial expressions. Rather, facial expression processing can be achieved through lower-cognitive, heuristical perceptual processing and expression of prototypical morphological musculature movement patterns that communicate discrete trustworthiness and capacity cues to conspecifics.
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  4.  36
    Trade-Offs in Low-Income Women’s Mate Preferences.Jacob M. Vigil, David C. Geary & Jennifer Byrd-Craven - 2006 - Human Nature 17 (3):319-336.
    A sample of 460 low-income women completed a mate preference questionnaire and surveys that assessed family background, life history, conscientiousness, sexual motives, self-ratings (e.g., looks), and current circumstances (e.g., income). A cluster analysis revealed two groups of women: women who reported a strong preference for looks and money in a short-term mate and commitment in a long-term mate, and women who reported smaller differences across mating context. Group differences were found in reported educational levels, family background, sexual development, number of (...)
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  5.  16
    The Socio-Relational Framework of Expressive Behaviors as an Integrative Psychological Paradigm.Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):408-428.
    This response shows how the socio-relational framework of expressive behaviors may be used to understand and predict social psychological processes, beyond sex differences in the expression of emotion. I use this opportunity to elaborate on several key concepts on the epigenesis of evolved social behaviors that were not fully addressed in the target article. These are: evidence of a natural history of masculine and feminine specialization (sect. R1); phenotypic plasticity and range of reactivity of social behaviors (sect. R2); exploitive and (...)
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  6.  8
    Multi-Level Selection, Social Signaling, and the Evolution of Human Suffering Gestures: The Example of Pain Behaviors.Jacob M. Vigil & Eric Kruger - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  7.  40
    A Social-Cognitive Model of Human Behavior Offers a More Parsimonious Account of Emotional Expressivity.Vivian Zayas, Joshua A. Tabak, Gul Gunaydy@ 4n, Jeanne M. Robertson & Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):407.
    According to socio-relational theory, men and women encountered different ecologies in their evolutionary past, and, as a result of different ancestral selection pressures, they developed different patterns of emotional expressivity that have persisted across cultures and large human evolutionary time scales. We question these assumptions, and propose that social-cognitive models of individual differences more parsimoniously account for sex differences in emotional expressivity.
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  8.  37
    On the Detection of Emotional Facial Expressions: Are Girls Really Better Than Boys?Vanessa LoBue, Judy S. DeLoache & Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):397.
    One facet of Vigil's socio-relational framework of expressive behaviors (SRFB) suggests that females are more sensitive to facial expressions than are males, and should detect facial expressions more quickly. A re-examination of recent research with children demonstrates that girls do detect various facial expressions more quickly than do boys. Although this provides support for SRFB, further examination of SRFB in children would lend important support this evolutionary-based theory.
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  9.  23
    The Other Side of the Coin: Intersexual Selection and the Expression of Emotions to Signal Youth or Maturity.George A. Lozano & Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):398.
    Vigil summarizes sex-related differences in emotivity, and presents a psychological model based on the restrictive assumption that responses to stimuli are dichotomous. The model uses for support the concept of intrasexual selection, but ignores intersexual selection. An alternative hypothesis might be that emotivity signals age: maturity in men and youth in women. Integration requires considering all evolutionary biology, not just agreeable concepts.
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  10.  22
    Intra-Regional Assortative Sociality May Be Better Explained by Social Network Dynamics Rather Than Pathogen Risk Avoidance.Jacob M. Vigil & Patrick Coulombe - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):96-97.
    Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) model is not entirely supported by common patterns of affect behaviors among people who live under varying climatic conditions and among people who endorse varying levels of (Western) religiosity and conservative political ideals. The authors' model is also unable to account for intra-regional heterogeneity in assortative sociality, which, we argue, can be better explained by a framework that emphasizes the differential expression of fundamental social cues for maintaining distinct social network structures.
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  11.  19
    Subtle Variation in Ambient Room Temperature Influences the Expression of Social Cognition.Jacob M. Vigil, Tyler J. Swartz & Lauren N. Rowell - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):502-503.
    Social signaling models predict that subtle variation in climatic temperature induces systematic changes in expressed cognition. An experiment showed that perceived room temperature was associated with variability in self-descriptions, social reactions of others, and desiring differing types of social networks. The findings reflect the tendency to inflate capacity demonstrations in warmer climates as a result of the social networking opportunities they enable.
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  12.  17
    Neuronal Deactivation is Equally Important for Understanding Emotional Processing.Jacob M. Vigil, Amber Dukes & Patrick Coulombe - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):169-170.
    In their analyses of the neural correlates of discrete emotionality, Lindquist et al. do not consider the numerous drawbacks to inferring psychological processes based on currently available cognitive neurometric technology. The authors also disproportionately emphasize the relevance of neuronal activation over deactivation, which, in our opinion, limits the scope and utility of their conclusions.
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  13.  9
    Does Ultrasociality Really Exist – and is It the Best Predictor of Human Economic Behaviors?Sarah S. Stith & Jacob M. Vigil - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  14.  8
    Task Specificity and the Impact on Both the Individual and Group During the Formation of Groups.Eric Kruger, Jacob M. Vigil & Sarah S. Stith - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  15.  12
    Facial Expression Judgments Support a Socio-Relational Model, Rather Than a Negativity Bias Model of Political Psychology.Jacob M. Vigil & Chance Strenth - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):331-332.
  16.  13
    Prejudicial Behavior: More Closely Linked to Homophilic Peer Preferences Than to Trait Bigotry.Jacob M. Vigil & Kamilla Venner - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):448-449.
    We disagree with Dixon et al. by maintaining that prejudice is primarily rooted in aversive reactions toward out-group members. However, these reactions are not indicative of negative attributes, such as trait bigotry, but rather normative homophily for peers with similar perceived attributes. Cognitive biases such as stereotype threat perpetuate perceptions of inequipotential and subsequent discrimination, irrespective of individuals' personality characteristics.
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  17.  8
    The Curse of Curves.Jacob M. Vigil, Chance R. Strenth, Andrea A. Mueller, Jared DiDomenico, Diego Guevara Beltran, Patrick Coulombe & Jane Ellen Smith - 2015 - Human Nature 26 (2):235-254.
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