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  1.  60
    A Socio-Relational Framework of Sex Differences in the Expression of Emotion.Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):375.
    Despite a staggering body of research demonstrating sex differences in expressed emotion, very few theoretical models (evolutionary or non-evolutionary) offer a critical examination of the adaptive nature of such differences. From the perspective of a socio-relational framework, emotive behaviors evolved to promote the attraction and aversion of different types of relationships by advertising the two most parsimonious properties of reciprocity potential, or perceived attractiveness as a prospective social partner. These are the individual's (a) perceived capacity or ability to provide expedient (...)
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  2.  44
    A Social-Cognitive Model of Human Behavior Offers a More Parsimonious Account of Emotional Expressivity.Vivian Zayas, Joshua A. Tabak, Gul [email protected] 4n, Jeanne M. Robertson & Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):407.
    According to socio-relational theory, men and women encountered different ecologies in their evolutionary past, and, as a result of different ancestral selection pressures, they developed different patterns of emotional expressivity that have persisted across cultures and large human evolutionary time scales. We question these assumptions, and propose that social-cognitive models of individual differences more parsimoniously account for sex differences in emotional expressivity.
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    On the Detection of Emotional Facial Expressions: Are Girls Really Better Than Boys?Vanessa LoBue, Judy S. DeLoache & Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):397.
    One facet of Vigil's socio-relational framework of expressive behaviors (SRFB) suggests that females are more sensitive to facial expressions than are males, and should detect facial expressions more quickly. A re-examination of recent research with children demonstrates that girls do detect various facial expressions more quickly than do boys. Although this provides support for SRFB, further examination of SRFB in children would lend important support this evolutionary-based theory.
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    The Socio-Relational Framework of Expressive Behaviors as an Integrative Psychological Paradigm.Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):408-428.
    This response shows how the socio-relational framework of expressive behaviors may be used to understand and predict social psychological processes, beyond sex differences in the expression of emotion. I use this opportunity to elaborate on several key concepts on the epigenesis of evolved social behaviors that were not fully addressed in the target article. These are: evidence of a natural history of masculine and feminine specialization (sect. R1); phenotypic plasticity and range of reactivity of social behaviors (sect. R2); exploitive and (...)
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    The Other Side of the Coin: Intersexual Selection and the Expression of Emotions to Signal Youth or Maturity.George A. Lozano & Jacob Miguel Vigil - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):398.
    Vigil summarizes sex-related differences in emotivity, and presents a psychological model based on the restrictive assumption that responses to stimuli are dichotomous. The model uses for support the concept of intrasexual selection, but ignores intersexual selection. An alternative hypothesis might be that emotivity signals age: maturity in men and youth in women. Integration requires considering all evolutionary biology, not just agreeable concepts.
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