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  1.  4
    A Qualitative Analysis of Ethical Perspectives on Recruitment and Consent for Human Intracranial Electrophysiology Studies.Joncarmen V. Mergenthaler, Winston Chiong, Daniel Dohan, Josh Feler, Cailin R. Lechner, Philip A. Starr & Jalayne J. Arias - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (1):57-67.
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  2.  11
    The Proactive Patient: Long-Term Care Insurance Discrimination Risks of Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers.Jalayne J. Arias, Ana M. Tyler, Benjamin J. Oster & Jason Karlawish - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (2):485-498.
    Previously diagnosed by symptoms alone, Alzheimer's disease is now also defined by measures of amyloid and tau, referred to as “biomarkers.” Biomarkers are detectible up to twenty years before symptoms present and open the door to predicting the risk of Alzheimer's disease. While these biomarkers provide information that can help individuals and families plan for long-term care services and supports, insurers could also use this information to discriminate against those who are more likely to need such services. In this article, (...)
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    A Matter of Intent: A Social Obligation to Improve Criminal Procedures for Individuals with Dementia.Jalayne J. Arias & Lauren S. Flicker - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):318-327.
    The relationship between dementia and criminal behavior perplexes legal and health care systems. Dementia is a progressive clinical syndrome defined by impairment in at least two cognitive domains that interferes with one's activities of daily. Dementia symptoms have been associated with behaviors that violate social norms and constitute criminal actions. A failure to address a gap in policies that support appropriate management of individuals with dementia reflects a failure in our social obligation to care for those who are most vulnerable (...)
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  4.  11
    Becoming the Standard: How Innovative Procedures Benefitting Public Health Are Incorporated Into the Standard of Care.Jalayne J. Arias - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):102-105.
    Physicians’ resistance to implementing innovative medical procedures due to a perceived risk of liability can adversely affect the public’s health. This resistance prevents public access to procedures that could better treat communicable or chronic diseases. Innovative procedures, for the purpose of this article, are medical practices that require physicians to modify current clinical approaches to treating or diagnosing a patient’s condition and incorporate: newly developed tests, treatments, drugs or devices ; or novel methods not commonly used by a majority of (...)
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    Becoming the Standard: How Innovative Procedures Benefitting Public Health Are Incorporated Into the Standard of Care.Jalayne J. Arias - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (s1):102-105.
    Physicians’ resistance to implementing innovative medical procedures due to a perceived risk of liability can adversely affect the public’s health. This resistance prevents public access to procedures that could better treat communicable or chronic diseases. Innovative procedures, for the purpose of this article, are medical practices that require physicians to modify current clinical approaches to treating or diagnosing a patient’s condition and incorporate: newly developed tests, treatments, drugs or devices ; or novel methods not commonly used by a majority of (...)
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