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  1. The Virtuous Influence of Ethical Leadership Behavior: Evidence From the Field.Mitchell J. Neubert, Dawn S. Carlson, K. Michele Kacmar, James A. Roberts & Lawrence B. Chonko - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):157-170.
    This study examines a moderated/mediated model of ethical leadership on follower job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. We proposed that managers have the potential to be agents of virtue or vice within organizations. Specifically, through ethical leadership behavior we argued that managers can virtuously influence perceptions of ethical climate, which in turn will positively impact organizational members' flourishing as measured by job satisfaction and affective commitment to the organization. We also hypothesized that perceptions of interactional justice would moderate the ethical (...)
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    The Influence of Ethical Leadership and Regulatory Focus on Employee Outcomes.Mitchell J. Neubert, Cindy Wu & James A. Roberts - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (2):269-296.
    Regulatory focus theory is proposed as offering an explanation for the influence of ethical leadership on organizational citizenship behaviors and employee commitments. The prevention focus mindset of an employee is argued to be the mechanism by which an ethical leader influences extra-role compliance behavior as well as normative commitment, whereas the promotion focus mindset of an employee is argued to be the mechanism by which an ethical leader influences extra-role voice behavior as well as affective commitment. Moreover, leader-member exchange is (...)
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    Generation Y’s Ethical Ideology and Its Potential Workplace Implications.Rebecca A. VanMeter, Douglas B. Grisaffe, Lawrence B. Chonko & James A. Roberts - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):93-109.
    Generation Y is a cohort of the population larger than the baby boom generation. Consisting of approximately 80 million people born between 1981 and 2000, Generation Y is the most recent cohort to enter the workforce. Workplaces are being redefined and organizations are being pressed to adapt as this new wave of workers is infused into business environments. One critical aspect of this phenomenon not receiving sufficient research attention is the impact of Gen Y ethical beliefs and ethical conduct in (...)
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