32 found
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  1.  97
    Core affect and the psychological construction of emotion.James A. Russell - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):145-172.
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  2.  22
    The Psychological Construction of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett & James A. Russell (eds.) - 2014 - Guilford Press.
    This volume presents cutting-edge theory and research on emotions as constructed events rather than fixed, essential entities. It provides a thorough introduction to the assumptions, hypotheses, and scientific methods that embody psychological constructionist approaches. Leading scholars examine the neurobiological, cognitive/perceptual, and social processes that give rise to the experiences Western cultures call sadness, anger, fear, and so on. The book explores such compelling questions as how the brain creates emotional experiences, whether the "ingredients" of emotions also give rise to other (...)
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  3.  73
    Emotion, core affect, and psychological construction.James A. Russell - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1259-1283.
    As an alternative to using the concepts of emotion, fear, anger, and the like as scientific tools, this article advocates an approach based on the concepts of core affect and psychological construction, expanding the domain of inquiry beyond “emotion”. Core affect is a neurophysiological state that underlies simply feeling good or bad, drowsy or energised. Psychological construction is not one process but an umbrella term for the various processes that produce: (a) a particular emotional episode's “components” (such as facial movement, (...)
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  4.  44
    Universality Revisited.Nicole L. Nelson & James A. Russell - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):8-15.
    Evidence does not support the claim that observers universally recognize basic emotions from signals on the face. The percentage of observers who matched the face with the predicted emotion (matching score) is not universal, but varies with culture and language. Matching scores are also inflated by the commonly used methods: within-subject design; posed, exaggerated facial expressions (devoid of context); multiple examples of each type of expression; and a response format that funnels a variety of interpretations into one word specified by (...)
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  5.  43
    Mixed Emotions Viewed from the Psychological Constructionist Perspective.James A. Russell - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (2):111-117.
    Feeling bad is one thing, judging something to be bad another. This hot/cold distinction helps resolve the debate between bipolar and bivariate accounts of affect. A typical affective reaction includes both core affect and judgments of the affective qualities of various aspects of the stimulus situation. Core affect is described by a bipolar valence dimension in which feeling good precludes simultaneously feeling bad and vice versa. Judgments of affective quality of opposite valence can occur simultaneously because the stimulus situation has (...)
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  6.  31
    Determination of Death by Neurologic Criteria in the United States: The Case for Revising the Uniform Determination of Death Act.Ariane Lewis, Richard J. Bonnie, Thaddeus Pope, Leon G. Epstein, David M. Greer, Matthew P. Kirschen, Michael Rubin & James A. Russell - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (S4):9-24.
    Although death by neurologic criteria is legally recognized throughout the United States, state laws and clinical practice vary concerning three key issues: the medical standards used to determine death by neurologic criteria, management of family objections before determination of death by neurologic criteria, and management of religious objections to declaration of death by neurologic criteria. The American Academy of Neurology and other medical stakeholder organizations involved in the determination of death by neurologic criteria have undertaken concerted action to address variation (...)
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  7.  84
    Descriptive and Prescriptive Definitions of Emotion.Sherri C. Widen & James A. Russell - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):377-378.
    Izard (2010) did not seek a descriptive definition of emotion—one that describes the concept as it is used by ordinary folk. Instead, he surveyed scientists’ prescriptive definitions—ones that prescribe how the concept should be used in theories of emotion. That survey showed a lack of agreement today and thus raised doubts about emotion as a useful scientific concept.
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  8.  26
    Comments on articles by frijda and by conway and bekerian.James A. Russell - 1987 - Cognition and Emotion 1 (2):193-197.
  9. Emotion in human consciousness is built on core affect.James A. Russell - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):26-42.
    This article explores the idea that Core Affect provides the emotional quality to any conscious state. Core Affect is the neurophysiological state always accessible as simply feeling good or bad, energized or enervated, even if it is not always the focus of attention. Core Affect, alone or more typically combined with other psychological processes, is found in the experiences of feeling, mood and emotion, including the subjective experiences of fear, anger and other so-called basic emotions which are commonly thought to (...)
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  10.  27
    Is it disgusting to be reminded that you are an animal?Dolichan Kollareth & James A. Russell - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1318-1332.
    Six studies tested the hypothesis that being reminded of our animal nature makes us feel disgust. Participants from three cultural groups indicated the intensity of their disgust reactions to pleasant and unpleasant animal reminder stories and pictures as well as to a statement directly reminding them of their animal nature. Findings did not support the hypothesis: Pleasant animal reminders reminded respondents of their animal nature, but were not disgusting. The direct reminder of our animal nature was not disgusting. There was (...)
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  11.  17
    Emotions Are Not Modules.James A. Russell - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (sup1):53-71.
    Jane is calmly strolling through the forest one lovely day. Suddenly, a large spider drops in front of her face. She immediately freezes; her heart races; her hands tremble; her face broadcasts “fear.” She screams and runs away. Both before and after, she concedes that spiders in this forest are harmless.Jane's reaction to the spider contrasts greatly with the way she normally reacts to events. Normally, or so the story goes, Jane weighs her options thoughtfully, choosing a course of action (...)
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  12.  34
    Do proposed facial expressions of contempt, shame, embarrassment, and compassion communicate the predicted emotion?Sherri C. Widen, Anita M. Christy, Kristen Hewett & James A. Russell - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):898-906.
  13.  30
    Shame as a Culture-Specific Emotion Concept.Dolichan Kollareth, Jose-Miguel Fernandez-Dols & James A. Russell - 2018 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 18 (3-4):274-292.
    On the assumption that shame is a universal emotion, cross-cultural research on shame relies on translations assumed to be equivalent in meaning. Our studies here questioned that assumption. In three studies,shamewas compared to its translations in Spanish and in Malayalam. American English speakers usedshamefor the emotional reaction to moral failures and its use correlated positively withguilt, whereasvergüenzaandnanakeduwere used less for moral stories and their use correlated less with the guilt words. In comparison with Spanish and Malayalam speakers’ ratings of their (...)
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  14.  22
    Emotions are not modules.James A. Russell - 2008 - In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The modularity of emotions. Calgary, Alta., Canada: University of Calgary Press. pp. 53-71.
  15.  18
    On the limits of the relation of disgust to judgments of immorality.Mary H. Kayyal, Joseph Pochedly, Alyssa McCarthy & James A. Russell - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  16.  85
    Introduction to special section: on defining emotion.James A. Russell - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (4):337-337.
  17.  23
    The within-subjects design in the study of facial expressions.Michelle Yik, Sherri C. Widen & James A. Russell - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1062-1072.
  18.  18
    The Relative Dominance of Different Facial Expressions of Emotion under Conditions of Perceptual Ambiguity.Stanley Coren & James A. Russell - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (5):339-356.
  19.  23
    The English word disgust has no exact translation in Hindi or Malayalam.Dolichan Kollareth & James A. Russell - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (6):1169-1180.
    Do different languages have a translation for the English word disgust that labels the same underlying concept? If not, the English word might label a culture-specific concept. Four studies compared disgust to its common translation in Hindi and in Malayalam by examining two components of the concept thought of as a script: causal antecedent and facial expression. The English word was used to refer to reactions to both unclean substances and moral violations; Hindi and Malayalam translations referred mainly to moral (...)
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  20.  20
    Prototypicality of emotions: A reaction time study.Beverley Fehr, James A. Russell & Lawrence M. Ward - 1982 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (5):253-254.
  21.  31
    Children's and adults' understanding of the “disgust face”.Sherri C. Widen & James A. Russell - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (8):1513-1541.
  22.  17
    On the Invalidity of Neta and Kim's Argument That Surprise is Always Valenced.Andrew Ortony & James A. Russell - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (1):64-67.
    In a challenge to Basic Emotion theories, Ortony suggested in a recent article that the existence of affect-free surprise means that surprise is not necessarily valenced and therefore arguably not an emotion. In an article in response, Neta and Kim argued that surprise is always valenced and therefore is an emotion, with apparent cases of affect-free surprise actually being cases of the cognitive state of unexpectedness rather than surprise. We view Neta and Kim's position as resting on an idiosyncratic stipulation (...)
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  23.  20
    Four Perspectives on the Psychology of Emotion: An Introduction.James A. Russell - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):291-291.
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  24.  25
    In defense of a psychological constructionist account of emotion: Reply to Zachar.James A. Russell - 2008 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):423-429.
    Comment on an article by Peter Zachar An account of emotion must include categories and dimensions. Categories because humans categorize reality, and a person's categorization of their own state influences aspects of that state. Dimensions because humans are always in some state of Core Affect, which varies by degree along dimensions of valence and activation . In Psychological Construction, Core Affect and a host of other "components" are separate on-going processes, always in some pattern. Occasionally the pattern resembles a prototype (...)
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  25.  8
    Purity is not a distinct moral domain.Dolichan Kollareth & James A. Russell - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e308.
    Purity violations overlap with other moral domains. They are not uniquely characterized by hypothesized markers of purity – the witness's emotion of disgust, taint to perpetrator's soul, or the diminished role of intention in moral judgment. Thus, Fitouchi et al.'s proposition that puritanical morality (a subset of violations in the purity domain) is part of cooperation-based morality is an important advance.
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  26. Introduction to a Special Section on Basic Emotion Theory.James A. Russell, Erika L. Rosenberg & Marc D. Lewis - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):363-363.
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  27.  19
    Neo-Vitalism in Affective Science.James A. Russell - 2022 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 6 (1):49-52.
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  28.  24
    Facial expressions as performances in mime.Mahsa Ershadi, Thalia R. Goldstein, Joseph Pochedly & James A. Russell - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (3):494-503.
    That facial expressions are universal emotion signals has been supported by observers agreeing on the emotion mimed by actors. We show that actors can mime a diverse range of states: emotions, cognitions, physical states, and actions. English, Hindi, and Malayalam speakers viewed 25 video clips and indicated the state conveyed. Within each language, at least 23 of the 25 clips were recognised above chance and base rate. Facial expressions of emotions are not special in their recognisability, and it is miming (...)
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  29.  35
    Environmental effects on affiliation among strangers.Albert Mehrabian & James A. Russell - forthcoming - Humanitas.
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  30. Environmental, task, and temperamental effects on work performance.James A. Russell & Albert Mehrabian - 1978 - Humanitas 14:75-95.
     
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  31. Human emotion is built on core affect.James A. Russell - forthcoming - Journal of Consciousness Studies.
     
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  32.  21
    Introduction: William James and His Legacy.James A. Russell - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (1):3-3.
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