6 found
Order:
  1.  90
    The Moral Dimension of Organizational Culture.James A. Waters & Frederick Bird - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):15 - 22.
    The lack of concrete guidance provided by managerial moral standards and the ambiguity of the expectations they create are discussed in terms of the moral stress experienced by many managers. It is argued that requisite clarity and feelings of obligation with respect to moral standards derive ultimately from public discussion of moral issues within organizations and from shared public agreement about appropriate behavior. Suggestions are made about ways in which the moral dimension of an organization's culture can be more effectively (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  2.  49
    Everyday Moral Issues Experienced by Managers.James A. Waters, Frederick Bird & Peter D. Chant - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (5):373 - 384.
    Based on the results of open ended interviews with managers in a variety of organizational positions, moral questions encountered in everyday managerial life are described. These involve transactions with employees, peers and superiors, customers, suppliers and other stakeholders. It is suggested that managers identify transactions as involving personal moral concern when they believe that a moral standard has a bearing on the situation and when they experience themselves as having the power to affect the transaction. This is the first in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  3. Integrity Management.James A. Waters - 1988 - In Suresh Srivastva (ed.), Executive Integrity: The Search for High Human Values in Organizational Life. Jossey-Bass.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  4.  38
    The Nature of Managerial Moral Standards.Frederick Bird & James A. Waters - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):1 - 13.
    Descriptions of how managers think about the moral questions that come up in their work lives are analyzed to draw out the moral assumptions to which they commonly refer. The moral standards thus derived are identified as (1) honesty in communication, (2) fair treatment, (3) special consideration, (4) fair competition, (5) organizational responsibility, (6) corporate social responsibility, and, (7) respect for law. It is observed that these normative standards assume the cultural form of social conventions but because managers invoke them (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  5.  41
    Attending to Ethics in Management.James A. Waters & Frederick Bird - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):493 - 497.
    Based on analysis of interviews with managers about the ethical questions they face in their work, a typology of morally questionable managerial acts is developed. The typology distinguishes acts committed against-the-firm (non-role and role-failure acts) from those committed on-behalf-of-the-firm (role-distortion and role-as-sertion acts) and draws attention to the different nature of the four types of acts. The argument is made that senior management attention is typically focused on the types of acts which are least problematical for most managers, and that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  6.  22
    The Uses of Moral Talk: Why Do Managers Talk Ethics? [REVIEW]Frederick Bird, Frances Westley & James A. Waters - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (1):75 - 89.
    When managers use moral expressions in their communications, they do so for several, sometimes contradictory reasons. Based upon analyses of interviews with managers, this article examines seven distinctive uses of moral talk, sub-divided into three groupings: (1) managers use moral talk functionally to clarify issues, to propose and criticize moral justifications, and to cite relevant norms; (2) managers also use moral talk functionally to praise and to blame as well as to defend and criticize structures of authority; finally (3) managers (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations