11 found
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  1. Toward an Understanding of Ethical Climate: Its Relationship to Ethical Behavior and Supervisory Influence. [REVIEW]James C. Wimbush & Jon M. Shepard - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (8):637 - 647.
    In recent years, theoretical and empirical developments in the area of organizational climate has provided the impetus for research concerning ethical climate. According to this latter research, ethical climate is a multi-dimensional construct which is manifested in organizations. Studies, however, have not focused on the relationship between ethical climate and ethical behavior. Furthermore, an enhanced understanding of the multi-dimensionality of ethical climate will likely advance what we know about organizational climate and culture in general. We propose further examination of ethical (...)
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  2.  53
    An Empirical Examination of the Relationship Between Ethical Climate and Ethical Behavior From Multiple Levels of Analysis.James C. Wimbush, Jon M. Shepard & Steven E. Markham - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (16):1705-1716.
    Victor and Cullen (1988) identified several dimensions of ethical climate that exist in organizations and organizational subunits. We tested the relationship between these dimensions of ethical climate and ethical behavior at different levels of analysis. Using Within and Between Analysis (WABA) (cf. Dansereau, Alutto and Yammarino, 1984), partial support was found for a relationship between dimensions of ethical climate and ethical behavior.
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  3.  52
    An Empirical Examination of the Multi-Dimensionality of Ethical Climate in Organizations.James C. Wimbush, Jon M. Shepard & Steven E. Markham - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):67-77.
    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ethical climate dimensions identified by Victor and Cullen (1987, 1988) could be replicated in the subunits of a multi-unit organization and if so, were the dimensions associated with particular types of operating units. We identified three of the dimensions of ethical climate found by Victor and Cullen and also found a new dimension of ethical climate related to service. Partial support was found for Victor and Cullen's hypothesis that certain ethical (...)
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  4.  16
    The Place of Ethics in Business: Shifting Paradigms?Jon M. Shepard, Jon Shepard, James C. Wimbush & Carroll U. Stephens - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):577-601.
    This article uses concepts from sociology, history, and philosophy to explore the shifting relationship between moral values and business in the Western world. We examine the historical roots and intellectual underpinnings of two major business-society paradigms in ideal-type terms. In pre-industrial Western society, we argue that business activity was linked to society’s values of morality . Armed with this understanding of the intellectual history of the moral unity and amoral business-society paradigms, we suggest that some variant of the moral unity (...)
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  5.  15
    The Place of Ethics in Business: Shifting Paradigms?Jon M. Shepard, Jon Shepard, James C. Wimbush & Carroll U. Stephens - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):577-601.
    This article uses concepts from sociology, history, and philosophy to explore the shifting relationship between moral values and business in the Western world. We examine the historical roots and intellectual underpinnings of two major business-society paradigms in ideal-type terms. In pre-industrial Western society, we argue that business activity was linked to society’s values of morality (the moral unity paradigm}-for good or for ill. With the rise of industrialism, we contend that business was freed from moral constraints by the alleged “invisible (...)
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  6.  20
    The Effect of Cognitive Moral Development and Supverisory Influence on Subordinates' Ethical Behavior.James C. Wimbush - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):383 - 395.
    The paper examines how supervisory influence and cognitive moral development influence subordinates' ethical decision-making and ethical behavior. The proposed interactive effect these major variables have on subordinates' ethical considerations are examined with respect to: (1) before an ethical dilemma occurs, (2) when faced with an ethical dilemma, (3) during the decision process, and (4) after ethical or unethical behavior has been executed. Propositions are presented and implications for research and practice are discussed.
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  7.  16
    Candor, Privacy, And.Dan R. Dalton, James C. Wimbush & Catherine M. Daily - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (1):87-99.
    Many areas of business ethics research are “sensitive.” We provide an empirical assessment of the randomized response techniquewhich provides absolute anonymity to subjects and “legal immunity” to the researcher. Beyond that, RRT techniques provide complete disclosure to subjects, unconditional privacy is maintained, and there is no deception.
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  8.  64
    Collecting "Sensitive" Data in Business Ethics Research: A Case for the Unmatched Count Technique (UCT). [REVIEW]Dan R. Dalton, Catherine M. Daily & James C. Wimbush - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (10):1049-1057.
    Some would argue that the more promising areas of business ethics research are "sensitive." In such areas, it would be expected that subjects, if inclined to respond at all, would be guarded in their responses, or respond inaccurately. We provide an introduction to an empirical approach -- the unmatched block count (UCT) -- for collecting these potentially sensitive data which provides absolute anonymity and confidentiality to subjects and "legal immunity" to the researcher. Interestingly, under UCT protocol researchers could not divulge (...)
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  9.  13
    Candor, Privacy, and "Legal Immunity" in Business Ethics Research: An Empirical Assessment of the Randomized Response Technique.Dan R. Dalton, James C. Wimbush & Catherine M. Daily - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (1):87-99.
    Many areas of business ethics research are “sensitive.” We provide an empirical assessment of the randomized response techniquewhich provides absolute anonymity to subjects and “legal immunity” to the researcher. Beyond that, RRT techniques provide complete disclosure to subjects, unconditional privacy is maintained, and there is no deception.
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  10.  40
    Genetic Screening in the Workplace: Legislative and Ethical Implications. [REVIEW]William D. Murry, James C. Wimbush & Dan R. Dalton - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (4):365 - 378.
    This paper discusses legal and ethical issues related to genetic screening. It is argued that persons identified with actual or perceived deleterious genetic markers are protected by the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Civil Rights Act of 1991, if members of a protected group, regardless of whether or not they are currently ill. However, legislation may not protect all employees in all scenarios, in which case, ethical principles should guide decision-making. In doing so a model of preventive (...)
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  11.  7
    An Examination of Supervisory Influence on Subordinates’ Ethical Behavior.James C. Wimbush - 1993 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 4:805-814.
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