12 found
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James W. Child [9]James Child [3]James William Child [1]
  1. Can Libertarianism Sustain a Fraud Standard?James W. Child - 1994 - Ethics 104 (4):722-738.
  2. Intellectual Property: Moral, Legal, and International Dilemmas.John P. Barlow, David H. Carey, James W. Child, Marci A. Hamilton, Hugh C. Hansen, Edwin C. Hettinger, Justin Hughes, Michael I. Krauss, Charles J. Meyer, Lynn Sharp Paine, Tom C. Palmer, Eugene H. Spafford & Richard Stallman - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    As the expansion of the Internet and the digital formatting of all kinds of creative works move us further into the information age, intellectual property issues have become paramount. Computer programs costing thousands of research dollars are now copied in an instant. People who would recoil at the thought of stealing cars, computers, or VCRs regularly steal software or copy their favorite music from a friend's CD. Since the Web has no national boundaries, these issues are international concerns. The contributors-philosophers, (...)
     
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  3.  78
    The Moral Foundations of Intangible Property.James W. Child - 1990 - The Monist 73 (4):578-600.
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  4.  22
    The Limits of Creditors' Rights: The Case of Third World Debt: JAMES W. CHILD.James W. Child - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):114-140.
    At present, Third World countries owe over one trillion dollars to the developed Western nations; much of the debt is held by the leading international commercial banks. The debt of six Latin American countries alone — Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela — is over $330 billion, of which $240 billion is owed to commercial banks. Let us immediately narrow our focus to loans made by the major international commercial banks to Third World governments. We shall not be concerned (...)
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  5.  33
    On the Theoretical Dependence of Correspondence Postulates.James Child - 1971 - Philosophy of Science 38 (2):170-177.
    The nature of the connection between theory and observation has been a major source of difficulty for philosophers of science. It is most vexing for those who would reduce the terms of a theory to those of an observation language, e.g. Carnap, Braithwaite, and Nagel. Carnap's work, particularly his treatment of physical theories as partially interpreted formalisms, forms the point of focus of this paper. Carnap attempted to make the connection between theory and observation through correspondence postulates. It is pointed (...)
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  6.  17
    Donald Davidson and Section 2.01 of the Model Penal Code.James W. Child - 1992 - Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (1):31-43.
    (1992). Donald Davidson and section 2.01 of the model penal code. Criminal Justice Ethics: Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 31-43. doi: 10.1080/0731129X.1992.9991909.
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  7.  7
    Armageddon and the Philosophers.James W. Child - 1988 - Public Affairs Quarterly 2 (3):1-31.
  8.  61
    'Exists' as a Predicate: A Reconsideration.James Child & Fred I. Goldberg - 1970 - Analysis 31 (2):53 - 57.
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  9. 'Exists' As A Predicate - A Reconsideration.James Child & Alonso Church - 1970 - Analysis 31 (2):53.
     
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  10.  7
    No Harm: Ethical Principles for a Free Market.James W. Child & T. Patrick Burke - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):262.
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  11.  28
    Profit: The Concept and Its Moral Features: JAMES W. CHILD.James W. Child - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (2):243-282.
    Profit is a concept that both causes and manifests deep conflict and division. It is not merely that people disagree over whether it is good or bad. The very meaning of the concept and its role in competing theories necessitates the deepest possible disagreement; people cannot agree on what profit is. Still, simply learning the starkly different sentiments expressed about profit gives us some feel for the depth of the conflict. Friends of capitalism have praised profit as central to the (...)
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  12.  9
    Response to Alexander.James W. Child - 1992 - Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):99-100.
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