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James F. Childress [83]James Childress [8]James E. Childress [3]
  1.  44
    Principles of Biomedical Ethics: Marking Its Fortieth Anniversary.James Childress & Tom Beauchamp - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):9-12.
    Volume 19, Issue 11, November 2019, Page 9-12.
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  2. Public Health Ethics: Mapping the Terrain.James F. Childress, Ruth R. Faden, Ruth D. Gaare, Lawrence O. Gostin, Jeffrey Kahn, Richard J. Bonnie, Nancy E. Kass, Anna C. Mastroianni, Jonathan D. Moreno & Phillip Nieburg - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):170-178.
    Public health ethics, like the field of public health it addresses, traditionally has focused more on practice and particular cases than on theory, with the result that some concepts, methods, and boundaries remain largely undefined. This paper attempts to provide a rough conceptual map of the terrain of public health ethics. We begin by briefly defining public health and identifying general features of the field that are particularly relevant for a discussion of public health ethics.Public health is primarily concerned with (...)
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  3.  18
    Playing God? Human Genetic Engineering and the Rationalization of Public Bioethical Debate.John Berkman, Stanley Hauerwas, Jeffrey Stout, Gilbert Meilaender, James F. Childress & John H. Evans - 2004 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 24 (1):183-217.
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  4.  74
    The Place of Autonomy in Bioethics.James F. Childress - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (1):12-17.
  5.  6
    Common Morality Principles in Biomedical Ethics: Responses to Critics.James F. Childress & Tom L. Beauchamp - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):164-176.
    After briefly sketching common-morality principlism, as presented in Principles of Biomedical Ethics, this paper responds to two recent sets of challenges to this framework. The first challenge claims that medical ethics is autonomous and unique and thus not a form of, or justified or guided by, a common morality or by any external morality or moral theory. The second challenge denies that there is a common morality and insists that futile efforts to develop common-morality approaches to bioethics limit diversity and (...)
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  6.  19
    Who Should Decide?: Paternalism in Health Care.James F. Childress - 1982 - Oxford University Press.
    "A very good book indeed: there is scarcely an issue anyone has thought to raise about the topic which Childress fails to treat with sensitivity and good judgement....Future discussions of paternalism in health care will have to come to terms with the contentions of this book, which must be reckoned the best existing treatment of its subject."--Ethics. "A clear, scholarly and balanced analysis....This is a book I can recommend to physicians, ethicists, students of both fields, and to those most affected--the (...)
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  7.  11
    Response to Commentaries.Tom L. Beauchamp & James F. Childress - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (4-5):560-579.
    After expressing our gratitude to the commentators for their valuable analyses and assessments of Principles of Biomedical Ethics, we respond to several particular critiques raised by the commentators under the following rubrics: the compatibility of different sets of principles and rules; challenges to the principle of respect for autonomy; connecting principles to cases and resolving their conflicts; the value of and compatibility of virtues and principles; common morality theory; and moral status. We point to areas where we see common agreement (...)
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  8.  86
    Appeals to Conscience.James F. Childress - 1979 - Ethics 89 (4):315-335.
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  9.  22
    Needed: A More Rigorous Analysis of Models of Decision Making and a Richer Account of Respect for Autonomy.James F. Childress - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (11):52-54.
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  10. Metaphors and Models of Doctor-Patient Relationships: Their Implications for Autonomy.James F. Childress & Mark Siegler - 1984 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (1):17-30.
  11.  4
    Community, Complicity, and Critique: Christian Concepts in Secular Bioethics.Aline H. Kalbian, Courtney S. Campbell & James F. Childress - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (12):37-39.
    McCarthy, Homan, and Rozier’s call for a renewal of open and honest dialogue between secular and theologically grounded bioethics is admirable. Yet, their essay argues for more than mere dia...
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  12. The Failure to Give: Reducing Barriers to Organ Donation.James F. Childress - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (1):1-16.
    : Moral frameworks for evaluating non-donation strategies to increase the supply of cadaveric human organs for transplantation and ways to overcome barriers to organ donation are explored. Organ transplantation is a very complex area, because the human body evokes various beliefs, symbols, sentiments, and emotions as well as various rituals and social practices. From a rationalistic standpoint, some policies to increase the supply of transplantable organs may appear to be quite defensible but then turn out to be ineffective and perhaps (...)
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  13.  63
    Civil Disobedience, Conscientious Objection, and Evasive Noncompliance: A Framework for the Analysis and Assessment of Illegal Actions in Health Care.James F. Childress - 1985 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (1):63-84.
    This essay explores some of the conceptual and moral issues raised by illegal actions in health care. The author first identifies several types of illegal action, concentrating on civil disobedience, conscientious objection or refusal, and evasive noncompliance. Then he sketches a framework for the moral justification of these types of illegal action. Finally, he applies the conceptual and normative frameworks to several major cases of illegal action in health care, such as "mercy killing" and some decisions not to treat incompetent (...)
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  14.  19
    Race, Racism, and Structural Injustice: Equitable Allocation and Distribution of Vaccines for the COVID-19.Helene D. Gayle & James F. Childress - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (3):4-7.
    Inequity has been a hallmark of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, especially in the sharply disproportionate impacts among people of color. Recent studies have confirmed that t...
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  15.  31
    Must Patients Always Be Given Food and Water?Joanne Lynn & James E. Childress - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (5):17-21.
  16.  5
    [Book Review] Practical Reasoning in Bioethics. [REVIEW]James F. Childress - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (4):42-43.
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  17. Methods in Bioethics.James Childress - 2009 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
    This article confines itself largely within boundaries of normative bioethics. It examines major types of principle-based methods, case-based methods, virtue ethics, ethics of care, and communitarian perspectives, along with some critical points from feminist perspectives and from rule-based theories. One cautionary note is in order: most of these types of method, theory, or perspective encompass a number of approaches that involve some degree of family resemblance. Since it will be impossible to examine all of these approaches in detail, the article (...)
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  18.  17
    Compensating Injured Research Subjects: I. The Moral Argument.James F. Childress - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (6):21-27.
  19. Moral Responsibility in Conflicts: Essays on Nonviolence, War and Conscience.James F. Childress - 1983 - Journal of Religious Ethics 11 (1):163-163.
     
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  20.  30
    Organ Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death: Lessons and Unresolved Controversies.James F. Childress - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):766-771.
    This article responds to the four pieces in this special symposium of the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics on uncontrolled organ donation following circulatory death . The response will focus on lessons and debates about the kinds of consent necessary and sufficient for temporary organ preservation in the context of DCD and for organ donation itself; on conflicts of obligation, loyalty, and interest in DCD and ways to address those conflicts; and on benefit, cost, risk assessments of uDCD programs, (...)
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  21.  44
    Conscience and Conscientious Actions in the Context of MCOs.James F. Childress - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (4):403-411.
    : Managed care organizations can produce conflicts of obligation and conflicts of interest that may lead to problems of conscience for health care professionals. This paper provides a basis for understanding the notions of conscience and conscientious objection and offers a framework for clinicians to stake out positions grounded in personal conscience as a way for them to respond to unacceptable pressures from managers to limit services.
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  22.  20
    Organ Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death: Lessons and Unresolved Controversies.James F. Childress - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):766-771.
    The several articles in this special issue on organ donation after circulatory determination of death or, as it is often put, donation after cardiac death, draw lessons from different kinds of experience in order to guide efforts in the U.S. to develop or refine policies for DCD. One lesson comes from a major and, by many measures, successful experimental DCD program in Washington, D.C. in the 1990s. Another lesson comes from European countries that have adopted presumed-consent legislation, a form of (...)
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  23. Fairness in the Allocation and Delivery of Health Care: A Case Study in Organ Transplantation.James F. Childress - forthcoming - Practical Reasoning in Bioethics.
     
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  24.  98
    Putting Patients First in Organ Allocation: An Ethical Analysis of the U.S. Debate.James F. Childress - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):365-376.
    Organ allocation policy involves a mixture of ethical, scientific, medical, legal, and political factors, among others. It is thus hard, and perhaps even impossible, to identify and fully separate ethical considerations from all these other factors. Yet I will focus primarily on the ethical considerations embedded in the current debate in the United States about organ allocation policy. I will argue that it is important to putpatientsfirstbut even then significant ethical questions will remain about exactly how to put patients first.
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  25.  4
    Must Patients Always Be Given Food and Water?Joanne Lynn & James F. Childress - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (5):17.
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  26. Metaphor and Analogy.James F. Childress - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
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  27.  12
    The Normative Principles of Medical Ethics.James F. Childress - 1997 - In Alastair V. Campbell (ed.), Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 29--56.
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  28.  13
    Human Cloning and Human Dignity: The Report of the President's Council on Bioethics.James F. Childress - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (3):15-18.
  29. Christian Ethics, Medicine, and Genetics.James F. Childress - 2001 - In Robin Gill (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  30.  1
    Priorities in Biomedical Ethics.James F. Childress - 1981 - The Westminster Press.
    Case studies raise questions about patients' rights, advanced lifeprolonging measures, human subjects in medical research, and the allocation of health care resources.
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  31.  1
    The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Ethics.James F. Childress & John Macquarrie - 1986 - The Westminster Press.
    The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Ethics is an invaluable reference work. Included are articles on basic ethical concepts; biblical and theological ethics; philosophical traditions; major non-Christian religious traditions; psychological, sociological, political, and other concepts important to Christian ethics; and, finally, substantial problems, such as war, usually including both information and options. With 620 entries cover a spectrum of topics that concern thinking people everywhere, providing clear, concise and accurate information about ethical concerns.
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  32.  24
    Nuremberg's Legacy: Some Ethical Reflections.James F. Childress - 2000 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (3):347-361.
  33.  15
    Ensuring Care, Respect, and Fairness for the Elderly.James F. Childress - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (5):27-31.
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  34.  12
    The Challenges of Public Ethics: Reflections on NBAC's Report.James F. Childress - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (5):9.
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  35.  20
    Triage in Response to a Bioterrorist Attack.James F. Childress - 2003 - In Jonathan D. Moreno (ed.), In the Wake of Terror: Medicine and Morality in a Time of Crisis. MIT Press. pp. 77--93.
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  36.  59
    Must We Always Respect Religious Belief?James F. Childress - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (1):3-3.
  37.  28
    Moral Discourse About War in the Early Church.James F. Childress - 1984 - Journal of Religious Ethics 12 (1):2-18.
    This study examines some of the moral and theological convictions that created tensions for early Christians who affirmed that the government's sword is ordained by God for a fallen world but also that Christians should not exercise it at least in warfare. Three important moral pressures toward Christian participation in war were the recognition of prevention or removal of harm as a requirement of neighbor-love, the related sense of responsibility, fault, and guilt for omissions, and the generalization test proposed by (...)
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  38.  6
    A Misplaced Debate in Bioethics.James F. Childress - 1997 - In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Stories and Their Limits: Narrative Approaches to Bioethics. Routledge. pp. 252.
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  39.  18
    Respect for Autonomy.James F. Childress & John C. Fletcher - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (3):34-35.
  40.  21
    Nonviolent Resistance: Trust and Risk-Taking.James F. Childress - 1973 - Journal of Religious Ethics 1:87 - 112.
    This paper analyzes nonviolent resistance and direct action, as seen by its practitioners and theoreticians, from the standpoint of trust and risk-taking. After an examination of the nature of trust, the author indicates how it can illuminate what selected figures such as Gandhi and King have claimed about nonviolence. He offers this analysis not as a defense but as a way of understanding nonviolence that can serve as a starting point for further discussion.
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  41.  13
    "Nonviolent Resistance: Trust and Risk-Taking" Twenty-Five Years Later.James F. Childress - 1997 - Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (2):213-220.
    Do pacifists and proponents of justified violence share a starting point? Whether or not just war theory contains an embedded presumption against violence is an important and disputed question. Substantively it is important not only because it has implications for the possibility of dialogue among Christians of different persuasions but also because the belief that the tradition advances no moral reservations about the use of force may have the effect of lowering the moral barriers against the resort to war. Conceptually (...)
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  42.  4
    A New Dictionary of Christian Ethics.James F. Childress & John Macquarrie (eds.) - 1986 - Scm Press.
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  43.  8
    Civil Disobedience and Political Obligation a Study in Christian Social Ethics.James F. Childress - 1971 - Yale University Press.
  44.  66
    The Right to Health Care.James F. Childress - 1979 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (2):132-147.
  45.  25
    Ethics From a Theocentric Perspective. Vol. 1: Theology and Ethics.James F. Childress - 1983 - Ethics 94 (1):136-138.
  46.  6
    The Identification of Ethical Principles.James F. Childress - 1977 - Journal of Religious Ethics 5 (1):39 - 66.
    This paper analyzes some issues that emerge in attempts to distinguish and relate "moral" and "nonmora1' action-guides. It examines one material criterion (otherregardingness) and three formal criteria (universalizability, prescriptivity, and overridingness) and considers whether they constitute necessary and/or sufficient conditions of "morality." It treats these criteria in relation to ideals and prudential, political, and religious considerations. Furthermore, it contends that the classification of action-guides as moral or nonmoral should not prejudge their respective weights or replace substantive moral debate. The formal (...)
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  47.  39
    COVID‐19 and Religious Ethics.Toni Alimi, Elizabeth L. Antus, Alda Balthrop-Lewis, James F. Childress, Shannon Dunn, Ronald M. Green, Eric Gregory, Jennifer A. Herdt, Willis Jenkins, M. Cathleen Kaveny, Vincent W. Lloyd, Ping-Cheung Lo, Jonathan Malesic, David Newheiser, Irene Oh & Aaron Stalnaker - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (3):349-387.
    The editors of the JRE solicited short essays on the COVID‐19 pandemic from a group of scholars of religious ethics that reflected on how the field might help them make sense of the complex religious, cultural, ethical, and political implications of the pandemic, and on how the pandemic might shape the future of religious ethics.
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  48.  4
    The Challenges of Public Ethics: Reflections on NBAC's Report.James F. Childress - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (5):9-11.
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  49.  10
    The Beginning of the End of PrinciplismPrinciples of Biomedical Ethics.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Tom L. Beauchamp & James F. Childress - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (4):37.
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  50. Lazare Benaroyo Alex John London Universite de Lausanne Carnegie Mellon University Jeff Blustein Jeff McMahan Albert Einstein College of Medicine Rutgers.E. Christian Brugger, Donald Marquis, Thomas Cavanaugh, James Nelson, Tod Chambers, Lennart Nordenfelt, James Childress, Anders Nordgren, Kai Draper & Fredrik Svenaeus - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27:1.
     
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1 — 50 / 94