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  1.  46
    "A Reverent and Obedient Evolution": Jonathan Edwards, the New Science, and the Socialism of Henry James Sr.James Duban - 2009 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (3):pp. 244-261.
  2.  7
    “Eternity Looking Through Time”: Sartor Resartus and Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”.James Duban - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):573-577.
  3.  11
    Heidegger, Sartre, and Irresolute Dasein in Philip Roth’s The Dying Animal, Everyman, and “Novotny’s Pain”.James Duban - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):441-465.
    In an interview concerning his novel The Anatomy Lesson, Philip Roth remarked that narrator Nathan Zuckerman “has to be in a state of vivid transformation or radical displacement. ‘I am not what I am—I am, if anything, what I am not!’”1 The utterance has been traced to Jean-Paul Sartre’s encounter, in Being and Nothingness, with ecstatic relations. Sartre, anticipating Roth’s description of Zuckerman, similarly defines the ecstatic dimensions of consciousness that constitute Dasein. According to Sartre, consciousness must fulfill three requirements: (...)
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  4.  6
    "Oceanic Wonder": Arthur Koestler and Melville's Castaway.James Duban - 2011 - Philosophy and Literature 35 (2):371-374.
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  5.  7
    Sartre and Koestler: Bisociation, Nothingness, and the Creative Experience in Roth's The Anatomy Lesson.James Duban - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (1):55-69.
    For my son NathanielRecent studies suggest that Philip Roth's creative impulse is in some measure indebted to Arthur Koestler's Insight and Outlook and to Jean-Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness.1 Koestler advances a theory of "bisociative" thinking—that is, the perception of consonance amidst the clash of seemingly dissonant planes of knowledge. The theme finds expression in the very title of Koestler's book, given the compatibility, despite opposite root prepositions, of such words as "in sight" and "out look." Insofar as Roth's narrator (...)
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  6.  5
    The Generalization of Holocaust Denial: Meyer Levin, William James, and the Broadway Production of The Diary of Anne Frank.James Duban - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):234-248.
    In his essay “Pragmatism and Humanism,” William James recalls a friend’s disappointment that the “prodigious star-group” known as the Big Dipper “should remind us Americans of nothing but a culinary utensil.”1 Such, presumably, is the fault of generalization, though James himself is less than specific in illustrating the occasional parity of varied perspectives. For example, he posits two identical equilateral triangles, one inverted and overlapping the other, and notes, “You can treat the adjoined figure as a star, as two big (...)
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