22 found
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  1.  78
    Locke, Natural Law, and New World Slavery.James Farr - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (4):495-522.
    This essay systematically reformulates an earlier argument about Locke and new world slavery, adding attention to Indians, natural law, and Locke's reception. Locke followed Grotian natural law in constructing a just-war theory of slavery. Unlike Grotius, though, he severely restricted the theory, making it inapplicable to America. It only fit resistance to "absolute power" in Stuart England. Locke was nonetheless an agent of British colonialism who issued instructions governing slavery. Yet they do not inform his theory--or vice versa. This creates (...)
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  2. Social Capital.James Farr - 2004 - Political Theory 32 (1):6-33.
    Taking its departure from current debates over social capital, this article presents new textual findings in a backward-revealing conceptual history. In particular, it analyzes the texts and contexts of Lyda J. Hanifan who was rediscovered by Robert Putnam as having (allegedly first) used the term; it offers discoveries of earlier uses of the term and concept-most notably by John Dewey-thereby introducing critical pragmatism as another tradition of social capital; and it recovers features of the critique of political economy in the (...)
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  3.  56
    "So Vile and Miserable an Estate": The Problem of Slavery in Locke's Political Thought.James Farr - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (2):263-289.
  4.  15
    The Way of Hypothesis: Locke on Method.James Farr - 1987 - Journal of the History of Ideas 48 (1):51.
  5.  11
    I. “So Vile and Miserable an Estate” the Problem of Slavery in Locke's Political Thought.James Farr - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (2):263-289.
  6.  40
    Popper's Hermeneutics.James Farr - 1983 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (2):157-176.
  7.  18
    Hume, Hermeneutics, and History: A "Sympathetic" Account.James Farr - 1978 - History and Theory 17 (3):285-310.
    Though Hume is often considered the hero of analytic philosophy in its positivistic phase, his concept of sympathy can be understood as an eighteenth- century prototype of Verstehen. Sympathy is central to Hume's moral philosophy, as he considered it the source of human motivation, social interaction, evaluation, and understanding. It has been acknowledged that sympathy, for Hume, was the human ability to associate with the sensations and passions of others. However, he also stated that this association was neither feeling nor (...)
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  8.  4
    Aspects of Locke.James Farr, Jakob de Roover, Sn Balagangadhara & Léonard C. Feldman - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (4):495-577.
    This essay systematically reformulates an earlier argument about Locke and new world slavery, adding attention to Indians, natural law, and Locke's reception. Locke followed Grotian natural law in constructing a just-war theory of slavery. Unlike Grotius, though, he severely restricted the theory, making it inapplicable to America. It only fit resistance to “absolute power” in Stuart England. Locke was nonetheless an agent of British colonialism who issued instructions governing slavery. Yet they do not inform his theory—or vice versa. This creates (...)
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  9. Locke,'Some Americans,'and the Discourse on 'Carolina'.James Farr - 2009 - Locke Studies 9:19-96.
  10.  22
    Slaves Bought with Money.James Farr - 1989 - Political Theory 17 (3):471-474.
  11.  7
    The Politics of Socialism: An Essay in Political Theory.James Farr - 1987 - Ethics 97 (2):478-479.
  12.  17
    Books in Review.James Farr - 1995 - Political Theory 23 (2):386-388.
  13.  31
    Book ReviewJudith N. Shklar, Redeeming American Political Thought. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998. Pp. 209. $38.00 ; $13.95. [REVIEW]James Farr - 2001 - Ethics 112 (1):182-185.
  14.  28
    Humean Explanations in the Moral Sciences.James Farr - 1982 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):57 – 80.
    There is an essential tension in Hume's account of explanation in the moral sciences. He holds the familiar (though problematic) view that explanations of action are causal explanations backed by the laws of human nature. But he also tenders a rational and historical model of explanation which has been neglected in Hume studies. Developed primarily in the Essays and put into practice in the History of England, this model holds that explanations in the moral sciences cite agents? reasons for acting (...)
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  15.  25
    In Search of Social Capital.James Farr - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (1):54-61.
  16. Marx and Positivism.James Farr - 1984 - In T. Ball & J. Farr (eds.), After Marx. Cambridge University Press. pp. 217--234.
     
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  17.  20
    Marx No Empiricist.James Farr - 1983 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (4):465-472.
  18.  29
    Marx, Science, and the Dialectical Method.James Farr - 1987 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 17 (2):221-232.
  19. Science: Realism, Criticism, History.James Farr - 1991 - In Terrell Carver (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Marx. Cambridge University Press. pp. 106--123.
  20.  12
    The Communist Manifestoes: Media of Marxism and Bolshevik Contagion in America.James Farr - 2018 - Studies in East European Thought 70 (2-3):85-105.
    The Communist Manifesto—rhetorical masterpiece of proletarian revolution—was published 69 years before the Bolshevik Revolution and had a complex reception history that implicated America and Russia in the long interval between. But once the Revolution shook the world, the Manifesto became indissolubly tied to it, forged together as constitutive moments of some supratemporal revolutionary dynamic. Its subsequent and further reception in America bore the marks of Bolshevik contagion, negatively in many quarters, positively in the early American communist movement. As various communist (...)
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  21.  4
    The General Will: The Evolution of a Concept.James Farr & David Lay Williams (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Although it originated in theological debates, the general will ultimately became one of the most celebrated and denigrated concepts emerging from early modern political thought. Jean-Jacques Rousseau made it the central element of his political theory, and it took on a life of its own during the French Revolution, before being subjected to generations of embrace or opprobrium. James Farr and David Lay Williams have collected for the first time a set of essays that track the evolving history of the (...)
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  22. The Self-Made Map: Cartographic Writing in Early Modern France. [REVIEW]James Farr - 2011 - The Medieval Review 10.
     
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