14 found
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  1.  17
    Matthew Arnold.Matthew Arnold & James Gribble - 1967 - Collier-Macmillan Macmillan.
  2.  12
    Introduction to Philosophy of Education.James Gribble - 1969 - Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  3.  52
    Logical and Psychological Considerations in the Criticism of F. R. Leavis.James Gribble - 1970 - British Journal of Aesthetics 10 (1):39-57.
  4.  27
    Forms of Knowledge.James Gribble - 1970 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 2 (1):3–14.
    In his classic discussion of liberal education and the nature of knowledge, Professor Hirst argues for a liberal education which is “directly concerned with the development of mind and rational knowledge.”1He sets out clear conditions which any activity must satisfy if it is to be a form of knowledge and suggests that there are seven distinct forms which satisfy these conditions:“mathematics, physical sciences, human sciences, history, religion, literature and the fine arts, philosophy”2The first argument of this paper is that literary (...)
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  5.  12
    Matthew Arnold.Marjorie Cruickshank, James Gribble & Matthew Arnold - 1968 - British Journal of Educational Studies 16 (2):214.
  6.  3
    Literary Education: A Revaluation.James Gribble - 1984 - British Journal of Educational Studies 32 (3):278-280.
  7.  19
    Empathy and Education.James Gribble & Graham Oliver - 1973 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 8 (1):3-29.
  8.  2
    Introduction to Philosophy of Education.Pat White & James Gribble - 1970 - British Journal of Educational Studies 18 (3):334.
  9.  6
    The Critical Fallacy in Education.James Gribble - 1974 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 6 (2):1-21.
  10.  1
    Professor Martin and Professor Roland.James Gribble - 1972 - Educational Theory 22 (1):109-114.
  11. Forms of Knowledge.James Gribble - 1970 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 2 (1):3-14.
    In his classic discussion of liberal education and the nature of knowledge, Professor Hirst argues for a liberal education which is “directly concerned with the development of mind and rational knowledge.”1He sets out clear conditions which any activity must satisfy if it is to be a form of knowledge and suggests that there are seven distinct forms which satisfy these conditions:“mathematics, physical sciences, human sciences, history, religion, literature and the fine arts, philosophy”2The first argument of this paper is that literary (...)
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  12.  5
    The Critical Fallacy in Education.James Gribble - 1974 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 6 (2):1–21.
  13.  3
    The Reality of Fictional Emotions.James Gribble - 1982 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 16 (4):53.
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  14. Reply to A. C. Kazepides.James Gribble - 1972 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 7 (4):296.
     
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