Results for 'James H. Barnes'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. The Effects of Culture on Ethical Decision-Making: An Application of Hofstede's Typology. [REVIEW]Scott J. Vitell, Saviour L. Nwachukwu & James H. Barnes - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (10):753 - 760.
    This paper addresses a significant gap in the conceptualization of business ethics within different cultural influences. Though theoretical models of business ethics have recognized the importance of culture in ethical decision-making, few have examinedhow this influences ethical decision-making. Therefore, this paper develops propositions concerning the influence of various cultural dimensions on ethical decision-making using Hofstede''s typology.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   129 citations  
  2.  41
    Consumer Ethical Beliefs and Personality Traits: An Exploratory Analysis. [REVIEW]Kumar C. Rallapalli, Scott J. Vitell, Frank A. Wiebe & James H. Barnes - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (7):487 - 495.
    The present study examines the relationships between consumers'' ethical beliefs and personality traits. Based on a survey of 295 undergraduate business students, the authors found that individuals with high needs for autonomy, innovation, and aggression, as well as individuals with a high propensity for taking risks tend to have less ethical beliefs concerning possible consumer actions. Individuals with a high need for social desirability and individuals with a strong problem solving coping style tend to have more ethical beliefs concerning possible (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  3.  71
    New Books. [REVIEW]D. R. Bell, K. Baier, Ronald W. Hepburn, Thomas McPherson, R. D. Bradley, D. D. Raphael, Antony Flew, W. H. F. Barnes, James Griffin, John Wheatley, Heinz-Juergen Schuering, D. P. Henry, Ernest H. Hutten, Anthony Kenny, Mary Warnock, Arthur Thomson & R. F. Holland - 1962 - Mind 71 (284):552-594.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  37
    James H. Nehring 57.James H. Nehring - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Artificial Intelligence: Its Scope and Limits.James H. Fetzer - 1990 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    1. WHAT IS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE? One of the fascinating aspects of the field of artificial intelligence (AI) is that the precise nature of its subject ..
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   125 citations  
  6. Zen and the Brain: Toward an Understanding of Meditation and Consciousness.James H. Austin - 1998 - MIT Press.
    The book uses Zen Buddhism as the opening wedge for an extraordinarily wide-ranging exploration of consciousness.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  7.  23
    Semantic Priming and Retrieval From Lexical Memory: Roles of Inhibitionless Spreading Activation and Limited-Capacity Attention.James H. Neely - 1977 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 106 (3):226-254.
  8.  36
    Bad Blood Thirty Years Later: A Q&A with James H. Jones.James H. Jones & Nancy M. P. King - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):867-872.
    Historian James H. Jones published the first edition of Bad Blood, the definitive history of the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, in 1981. Its clear-eyed examination of that research and its implications remains a bioethics classic, and the 30-year anniversary of its publication served as the impetus for the reexamination of research ethics that this symposium presents. Recent revelations about the United States Public Health Service study that infected mental patients and prisoners in Guatemala with syphilis in the late 1940s in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  40
    Scientific Explanation and the Causal Structure of the World. Wesley Salmon.James H. Fetzer - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (4):597-610.
  10. Definitions and Definability Philosophical Perspectives.James H. Fetzer, George N. Schlesinger & David Shatz - 1991
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  11.  25
    Computer Reliability and Public Policy: Limits of Knowledge of Computer-Based Systems*: JAMES H. FETZER.James H. Fetzer - 1996 - Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):229-266.
    Perhaps no technological innovation has so dominated the second half of the twentieth century as has the introduction of the programmable computer. It is quite difficult if not impossible to imagine how contemporary affairs—in business and science, communications and transportation, governmental and military activities, for example—could be conducted without the use of computing machines, whose principal contribution has been to relieve us of the necessity for certain kinds of mental exertion. The computer revolution has reduced our mental labors by means (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Information: Does It Have to Be True? [REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (2):223-229.
    Luciano Floridi (2003) offers a theory of information as a strongly semantic notion, according to which information encapsulates truth, thereby making truth a necessary condition for a sentence to qualify as information. While Floridi provides an impressive development of this position, the aspects of his approach of greatest philosophical significance are its foundations rather than its formalization. He rejects the conception of information as meaningful data, which entails at least three theses – that information can be false; that tautologies are (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  13. Towards a Theory of Privacy in the Information Age.James H. Moor - 1997 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 27 (3):27-32.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  14.  65
    Professor William James' Interpretation of Religious Experience.James H. Leuba - 1904 - International Journal of Ethics 14 (3):322-339.
  15.  96
    Three Myths of Computer Science.James H. Moor - 1978 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 29 (3):213-222.
  16.  75
    Perceptions of Country Corruption: Antecedents and Outcomes. [REVIEW]James H. Davis & John A. Ruhe - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):275 - 288.
    Globalization has increased the need for managers (and future managers) to predict the potential for country corruption. This study examines the relationship between Hofstede''s cultural dimensions and how country corruption is perceived. Power distance, individualism and masculinity were found to explain a significant portion of the variance in perceived corruption. A significant portion of country''s risk, trade flow with U.S.A., foreign investment, and per capita income was explained by perceived corruption.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  17. What is Computer Ethics?James H. Moor - 1985 - Metaphilosophy 16 (4):266-275.
  18.  7
    The Nature of Explanation.James H. Fetzer - 1984 - Philosophy of Science 51 (3):516-519.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  19. Why We Need Better Ethics for Emerging Technologies.James H. Moor - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (3):111-119.
    Technological revolutions are dissected into three stages: the introduction stage, the permeation stage, and the power stage. The information revolution is a primary example of this tripartite model. A hypothesis about ethics is proposed, namely, ethical problems increase as technological revolutions progress toward and into the power stage. Genetic technology, nanotechnology, and neurotechnology are good candidates for impending technological revolutions. Two reasons favoring their candidacy as revolutionary are their high degree of malleability and their convergence. Assuming the emerging technologies develop (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  20.  8
    Zen-Brain Reflections.James H. Austin - 2006 - MIT Press.
    This sequel to the widely read Zen and the Brain continues James Austin's explorations into the key interrelationships between Zen Buddhism and brain research. In Zen-Brain Reflections, Austin, a clinical neurologist, researcher, and Zen practitioner, examines the evolving psychological processes and brain changes associated with the path of long-range meditative training. Austin draws not only on the latest neuroscience research and new neuroimaging studies but also on Zen literature and his personal experience with alternate states of consciousness.Zen-Brain Reflections takes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  21.  18
    Hume's Philosophical Development.James H. Noxon - 1973 - New York: Clarendon Press.
  22. An Analysis of the Turing Test.James H. Moor - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 30 (4):249 - 257.
  23. Program Verification: The Very Idea.James H. Fetzer - 1988 - Communications of the Acm 31 (9):1048--1063.
    The notion of program verification appears to trade upon an equivocation. Algorithms, as logical structures, are appropriate subjects for deductive verification. Programs, as causal models of those structures, are not. The success of program verification as a generally applicable and completely reliable method for guaranteeing program performance is not even a theoretical possibility.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  24. Global Health and the Scientific Research Agenda.James H. Flory & Philip Kitcher - 2004 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (1):36-65.
  25.  29
    Mental Algorithms: Are Minds Computational Systems?James H. Fetzer - 1994 - Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (1):1-29.
    The idea that human thought requires the execution of mental algorithms provides a foundation for research programs in cognitive science, which are largely based upon the computational conception of language and mentality. Consideration is given to recent work by Penrose, Searle, and Cleland, who supply various grounds for disputing computationalism. These grounds in turn qualify as reasons for preferring a non-computational, semiotic approach, which can account for them as predictable manifestations of a more adquate conception. Thinking does not ordinarily require (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  26.  16
    Mental Algorithms: Are Minds Computational Systems?James H. Fetzer - 1994 - Pragmatics and Cognition 2 (1):1-29.
    The idea that human thought requires the execution of mental algorithms provides a foundation for research programs in cognitive science, which are largely based upon the computational conception of language and mentality. Consideration is given to recent work by Penrose, Searle, and Cleland, who supply various grounds for disputing computationalism. These grounds in turn qualify as reasons for preferring a non-computational, semiotic approach, which can account for them as predictable manifestations of a more adquate conception. Thinking does not ordinarily require (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  27.  34
    Connectionism and Cognition: Why Fodor and Pylyshyn Are Wrong.James H. Fetzer - 1992 - In A. Clark & Ronald Lutz (eds.), Connectionism in Context. Springer Verlag. pp. 305-319.
  28.  51
    The Discretionary Normativity of Requests.James H. P. Lewis - 2018 - Philosophers' Imprint 18:1-16.
    Being able to ask others to do things, and thereby giving them reasons to do those things, is a prominent feature of our interpersonal lives. In this paper, I discuss the distinctive normative status of requests – what makes them different from commands and demands. I argue for a theory of this normative phenomenon which explains the sense in which the reasons presented in requests are a matter of discretion. This discretionary quality, I argue, is something that other theories cannot (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  43
    Information, Misinformation, and Disinformation.James H. Fetzer - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (2):223-229.
    Luciano Floridi offers a theory of information as a “strongly semantic” notion, according to which information encapsulates truth, thereby making truth a necessary condition for a sentence to qualify as “information”. While Floridi provides an impressive development of this position, the aspects of his approach of greatest philosophical significance are its foundations rather than its formalization. He rejects the conception of information as meaningful data, which entails at least three theses – that information can be false; that tautologies are information; (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  30. A Letter Concerning Toleration.John Locke & James H. Tully (eds.) - 1963 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    John Locke's subtle and influential defense of religious toleration as argued in his seminal _Letter Concerning Toleration_ appears in this edition as introduced by one of our most distinguished political theorists and historians of political thought.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   87 citations  
  31.  4
    Zen-Brain Reflections.James H. Austin - 2010 - MIT Press.
    This sequel to the widely read Zen and the Brain continues James Austin's explorations into the key interrelationships between Zen Buddhism and brain research. In Zen-Brain Reflections, Austin, a clinical neurologist, researcher, and Zen practitioner, examines the evolving psychological processes and brain changes associated with the path of long-range meditative training. Austin draws not only on the latest neuroscience research and new neuroimaging studies but also on Zen literature and his personal experience with alternate states of consciousness.Zen-Brain Reflections takes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  32.  12
    Scientific Knowledge and Its Social Problems.James H. Moor - 1973 - Philosophy of Science 40 (3):455-457.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  33.  18
    Moral Dilemmas.James H. McGrath - 1990 - Noûs 24 (2):360-363.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  34.  92
    Philosophical Aspects of Program Verification.James H. Fetzer - 1991 - Minds and Machines 1 (2):197-216.
    A debate over the theoretical capabilities of formal methods in computer science has raged for more than two years now. The function of this paper is to summarize the key elements of this debate and to respond to important criticisms others have advanced by placing these issues within a broader context of philosophical considerations about the nature of hardware and of software and about the kinds of knowledge that we have the capacity to acquire concerning their performance.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  35. Just Consequentialism and Computing.James H. Moor - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):61-65.
    Computer and information ethics, as well as other fields of applied ethics, need ethical theories which coherently unify deontological and consequentialist aspects of ethical analysis. The proposed theory of just consequentialism emphasizes consequences of policies within the constraints of justice. This makes just consequentialism a practical and theoretically sound approach to ethical problems of computer and information ethics.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  36.  15
    Group Decision and Social Interaction: A Theory of Social Decision Schemes.James H. Davis - 1973 - Psychological Review 80 (2):97-125.
  37.  45
    Reason, Relativity, and Responsibility in Computer Ethics.James H. Moor - 1998 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (1):14-21.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  38.  28
    The Meaning of ΝΟΥΣ in the Posterior Analytics.James H. Lesher - 1973 - Phronesis 18 (1):44 - 68.
  39.  61
    A World of Dispositions.James H. Fetzer - 1977 - Synthese 34 (4):397 - 421.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  40.  56
    Syntax, Semantics, and Ontology: A Probabilistic Causal Calculus.James H. Fetzer & Donald E. Nute - 1979 - Synthese 40 (3):453 - 495.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  41.  28
    "Group Decision and Social Interaction: A Theory of Social Decision Schemes": Errata.James H. Davis - 1973 - Psychological Review 80 (4):302-302.
  42.  34
    The Meaning of NOYΣ in the Posterior Analytics.James H. Lesher - 1973 - Phronesis 18 (1):44-68.
  43. Thinking and Computing: Computers as Special Kinds of Signs. [REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (3):345-364.
    Cognitive science has been dominated by the computational conception that cognition is computation across representations. To the extent to which cognition as computation across representations is supposed to be a purposive, meaningful, algorithmic, problem-solving activity, however, computers appear to be incapable of cognition. They are devices that can facilitate computations on the basis of semantic grounding relations as special kinds of signs. Even their algorithmic, problem-solving character arises from their interpretation by human users. Strictly speaking, computers as such — apart (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  44. The Status and Future of the Turing Test.James H. Moor - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (1):77-93.
    The standard interpretation of the imitation game is defended over the rival gender interpretation though it is noted that Turing himself proposed several variations of his imitation game. The Turing test is then justified as an inductive test not as an operational definition as commonly suggested. Turing's famous prediction about his test being passed at the 70% level is disconfirmed by the results of the Loebner 2000 contest and the absence of any serious Turing test competitors from AI on the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  45.  7
    On Knowing: Essays for the Left Hand.H. E. O. James & Jerome S. Bruner - 1963 - British Journal of Educational Studies 11 (2):207.
  46.  70
    Evolution, Rationality and Testability.James H. Fetzer - 1990 - Synthese 82 (3):423-39.
    Cosmides, Wason, and Johnson-Laird, among others, have suggested evidence that reasoning abilities tend to be domain specific, insofar as humans do not appear to acquire capacities for logical reasoning that are applicable across different contexts. Unfortunately, the significance of these findings depends upon the specific variety of logical reasoning under consideration. Indeed, there seem to be at least three grounds for doubting such conclusions, since: (1) tests of reasoning involving the use of material conditionals may not be appropriate for representing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  47.  28
    Probabilistic Explanations.James H. Fetzer - 1982 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:194-207.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic defense of the single-case propensity account of probabilistic explanation from the criticisms advanced by Hanna and by Humphreys and to offer a critical appraisal of the aleatory conception advanced by Humphreys and of the deductive-nomological-probabilistic approach Railton has proposed. The principal conclusion supported by this analysis is that the Requirements of Maximal Specificity and of Strict Maximal Specificity afford the foundation for completely objective explanations of probabilistic explananda, so long as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  48.  57
    A Single Case Propensity Theory of Explanation.James H. Fetzer - 1974 - Synthese 28 (2):171 - 198.
  49. Disinformation: The Use of False Information. [REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (2):231-240.
    The distinction between misinformation and disinformation becomes especially important in political, editorial, and advertising contexts, where sources may make deliberate efforts to mislead, deceive, or confuse an audience in order to promote their personal, religious, or ideological objectives. The difference consists in having an agenda. It thus bears comparison with lying, because lies are assertions that are false, that are known to be false, and that are asserted with the intention to mislead, deceive, or confuse. One context in which disinformation (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  9
    Vacancy Trapping in Quenched Aluminium Alloys.K. H. Westmacott, R. S. Barnes, D. Hull & R. E. Smallman - 1961 - Philosophical Magazine 6 (67):929-935.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000