Results for 'James L. Barnes'

998 found
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  1.  8
    Philosophy of Engineering, East and West.Rita Armstrong, Erik W. Armstrong, James L. Barnes, Susan K. Barnes, Roberto Bartholo, Terry Bristol, Cao Dongming, Cao Xu, Carleton Christensen, Chen Jia, Cheng Yifa, Christelle Didier, Paul T. Durbin, Michael J. Dyrenfurth, Fang Yibing, Donald Hector, Li Bocong, Li Lei, Liu Dachun, Heinz C. Luegenbiehl, Diane P. Michelfelder, Carl Mitcham, Suzanne Moon, Byron Newberry, Jim Petrie, Hans Poser, Domício Proença, Qian Wei, Wim Ravesteijn, Viola Schiaffonati, Édison Renato Silva, Patrick Simonnin, Mario Verdicchio, Sun Lie, Wang Bin, Wang Dazhou, Wang Guoyu, Wang Jian, Wang Nan, Yin Ruiyu, Yin Wenjuan, Yuan Deyu, Zhao Junhai, Baichun Zhang & Zhang Kang - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
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  2. The Effects of Culture on Ethical Decision-Making: An Application of Hofstede's Typology. [REVIEW]Scott J. Vitell, Saviour L. Nwachukwu & James H. Barnes - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (10):753 - 760.
    This paper addresses a significant gap in the conceptualization of business ethics within different cultural influences. Though theoretical models of business ethics have recognized the importance of culture in ethical decision-making, few have examinedhow this influences ethical decision-making. Therefore, this paper develops propositions concerning the influence of various cultural dimensions on ethical decision-making using Hofstede''s typology.
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  3. Producing A Technologically Literate Citizen: A Curriculum Model.James L. Barnes - 1988 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 8 (5):483-489.
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  4.  31
    An Interactive Activation Model of Context Effects in Letter Perception: I. An Account of Basic Findings.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1981 - Psychological Review 88 (5):375-407.
  5.  23
    Is There an Archê Kakou in Plato?James L. Wood - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (2):349-384.
  6.  18
    The Time Course of Perceptual Choice: The Leaky, Competing Accumulator Model.Marius Usher & James L. McClelland - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (3):550-592.
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  7. Knowledge and Deductive Closure.James L. White - 1991 - Synthese 86 (3):409 - 423.
    The question whether epistemological concepts are closed under deduction is an important one since many skeptical arguments depend on closure. Such skepticism can be avoided if closure is not true of knowledge (or justification). This response to skepticism is rejected by Peter Klein and others. Klein argues that closure is true, and that far from providing the skeptic with a powerful weapon for undermining our knowledge, it provides a tool for attacking the skeptic directly. This paper examines various arguments in (...)
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  8.  27
    The Teaching of Values: Caring and Appreciation.James L. Jarrett - 1992 - British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (2):185-187.
  9. The Duty to Protect: Ethical, Legal, and Professional Considerations for Mental Health Professionals.James L. Werth, Elizabeth Reynolds Welfel & G. Andrew H. Benjamin (eds.) - 2009 - American Psychological Association.
  10.  30
    Distributed Memory and the Representation of General and Specific Information.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (2):159-188.
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  11.  11
    The Relationship Between the Type A Behavior Pattern, Fear of Death, and Manifest Anxiety.James L. Tramill, P. Jeannie Kleinhammer-Tramill, Stephen F. Davis, Cherri S. Parks & David Alexander - 1984 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (1):42-44.
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  12.  17
    Why There Are Complementary Learning Systems in the Hippocampus and Neocortex: Insights From the Successes and Failures of Connectionist Models of Learning and Memory.James L. McClelland, Bruce L. McNaughton & Randall C. O'Reilly - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (3):419-457.
  13.  15
    A Proposed Relationship Between the Unidimensional Short Form of the TMAS and the DAS: The Effects of Embedding Vs. Separate Administration.James L. Tramill, Stephen F. Davis, Sarah Bremer, Michael M. Dudeck & David L. Elsbury - 1982 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (4):209-211.
  14.  58
    Letting Structure Emerge: Connectionist and Dynamical Systems Approaches to Cognition.James L. McClelland, Matthew M. Botvinick, David C. Noelle, David C. Plaut, Timothy T. Rogers, Mark S. Seidenberg & Linda B. Smith - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):348-356.
  15.  35
    Letting Structure Emerge: Connectionist and Dynamical Systems Approaches to Cognition.Linda B. Smith James L. McClelland, Matthew M. Botvinick, David C. Noelle, David C. Plaut, Timothy T. Rogers, Mark S. Seidenberg - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):348.
  16.  4
    On the Time Relations of Mental Processes: An Examination of Systems of Processes in Cascade.James L. McClelland - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (4):287-330.
  17.  71
    Modal Rationalism and the Transference of Meaning.James L. Trafford - 2010 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):97-107.
    The lesson is familiar. Kripke’s arguments in favor of a posteriori necessary truths annul the idea that conceivability is a guide to metaphysical possibility because determining that which is a priori is a separate issue from determining that which is necessary. Modal rationalists do not completely agree with this conclusion. Following recent work on two-dimensional semantics, David Chalmers suggests that two distinct semantic values can be assigned to a statement, depending on whether we consider possible worlds as counterfactual or counteractual. (...)
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  18.  18
    Individual Differences in Response to Automation: The Five Factor Model of Personality.James L. Szalma & Grant S. Taylor - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 17 (2):71-96.
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  19.  5
    Loss Aversion and Inhibition in Dynamical Models of Multialternative Choice.Marius Usher & James L. McClelland - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (3):757-769.
  20.  93
    The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    “Brain death,” the determination of human death by showing the irreversible loss of all clinical functions of the brain, has become a worldwide practice. A biophilosophical account of brain death requires four sequential tasks: agreeing on the paradigm of death, a set of preconditions that frame the discussion; determining the definition of death by making explicit the consensual concept of death; determining the criterion of death that proves the definition has been fulfilled by being both necessary and sufficient for death; (...)
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  21. Connectionist Models of Cognition.Michael Sc Thomas & James L. McClelland - 2008 - In Ron Sun (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Computational Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
  22.  37
    A Defense of the Whole‐Brain Concept of Death.James L. Bernat - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (2):14-23.
  23.  52
    Rules or Connections in Past-Tense Inflections: What Does the Evidence Rule Out?James L. McClelland & Karalyn Patterson - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):465-472.
  24.  37
    Whither Brain Death?James L. Bernat - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):3-8.
    The publicity surrounding the recent McMath and Muñoz cases has rekindled public interest in brain death: the familiar term for human death determination by showing the irreversible cessation of clinical brain functions. The concept of brain death was developed decades ago to permit withdrawal of therapy in hopeless cases and to permit organ donation. It has become widely established medical practice, and laws permit it in all U.S. jurisdictions. Brain death has a biophilosophical justification as a standard for determining human (...)
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  25. The Place of Modeling in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):11-38.
  26.  7
    Putting Knowledge in its Place: A Scheme for Programming Parallel Processing Structures on the Fly.James L. McClelland - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):113-146.
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  27.  11
    The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    The definition of death is one of the oldest and most enduring problems in biophilosophy and bioethics. Serious controversies over formally defining death began with the invention of the positive-pressure mechanical ventilator in the 1950s. For the first time, physicians could maintain ventilation and, hence, circulation on patients who had sustained what had been previously lethal brain damage. Prior to the development of mechanical ventilators, brain injuries severe enough to induce apnea quickly progressed to cardiac arrest from hypoxemia. Before the (...)
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  28. Emergence in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):751-770.
    The study of human intelligence was once dominated by symbolic approaches, but over the last 30 years an alternative approach has arisen. Symbols and processes that operate on them are often seen today as approximate characterizations of the emergent consequences of sub- or nonsymbolic processes, and a wide range of constructs in cognitive science can be understood as emergents. These include representational constructs (units, structures, rules), architectural constructs (central executive, declarative memory), and developmental processes and outcomes (stages, sensitive periods, neurocognitive (...)
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  29.  42
    Are There Interactive Processes in Speech Perception?James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman & Lori L. Holt - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (8):363-369.
  30.  36
    Interactive Activation and Mutual Constraint Satisfaction in Perception and Cognition.James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman, Donald J. Bolger & Pranav Khaitan - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1139-1189.
    In a seminal 1977 article, Rumelhart argued that perception required the simultaneous use of multiple sources of information, allowing perceivers to optimally interpret sensory information at many levels of representation in real time as information arrives. Building on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis—the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented through the bidirectional propagation of activation among simple processing units. We then examine the interactive activation (...)
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  31.  71
    Subjectivization in Ethics.James L. Hudson - 1989 - American Philosophical Quarterly 26 (3):221 - 229.
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  32.  19
    Common Law, Common Property, and Common Enemy: Notes on the Political Geography of Water Resources Management for the Sundarbans Area of Bangladesh. [REVIEW]James L. Wescoat - 1990 - Agriculture and Human Values 7 (2):73-87.
    Water has a dual role in the Sundarbans area of southwestern Bangladesh. Hydrologic processes are vital to the ecological functioning and cultural identity of the mangrove ecosystem. But at the same time, large scale water development creates external forces that threaten the Sundarbans environment. Water is managed to a limited degree as a common property resource, both in the Sundarbans and in larger regions. It is also managed as private property, a public good, a state-controlled resource, an open access resource, (...)
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  33.  15
    The Effects of Chronic Ethanol Challenges on Aggressive Responding in Rats Maintained on a Semideprivation Diet.James L. Tramill, Andrea L. Wesley & Stephen F. Davis - 1981 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (1):51-52.
  34.  23
    Timing Volition: Questions of What and When About W.James L. Ringo - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):550-551.
  35.  18
    On Noncongruence Between the Concept and Determination of Death.James L. Bernat - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (6):25-33.
  36.  2
    Freedom in the Philebus.James L. Wood - 2007 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:205-216.
    This paper explores a possible Platonic grounding of human freedom in the Philebus. The Philebus presents a particularly intruiging account of the humangood and freedom alike in terms of the right relation of nous and pleasure. Through a close analysis of key passages in this dialogue I show how Plato conceives of freedom in terms of the intellect’s ordering and directing of desire and pleasure to genuinely fulfilling ends. The greatest fulfillment of desire comes together with the purest pleasure in (...)
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  37.  13
    Incorporating Rapid Neocortical Learning of New Schema-Consistent Information Into Complementary Learning Systems Theory.James L. McClelland - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1190-1210.
  38.  8
    A Conceptual Justification for Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):S19-S21.
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  39. The Biophilosophical Basis of Whole-Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2002 - Soc Philos Policy 19 (2):324-42.
    Notwithstanding these wise pronouncements, my project here is to characterize the biological phenomenon of death of the higher animal species, such as vertebrates. My claim is that the formulation of “whole- brain death ” provides the most congruent map for our correct understanding of the concept of death. This essay builds upon the foundation my colleagues and I have laid since 1981 to characterize the concept of death and refine when this event occurs. Although our society's well-accepted program of multiple (...)
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  40. Nietzsche's Zarathustra Notes of the Seminar Given in 1934-1939 by C.G. Jung ; Edited by James L. Jarrett.C. G. Jung & James L. Jarrett - 1989
     
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  41.  11
    Linda L. Barnes. Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts: China, Healing, and the West to 1848. 458 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: Harvard University Press, 2005. $49.95. [REVIEW]Charlotte Furth - 2007 - Isis 98 (1):161-162.
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  42.  64
    Chronic Disorders of Consciousness.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Lancet 367 (9517):1181-1192.
  43.  25
    The Educational Writings of John Locke.James L. Axtell & John Locke - 1969 - British Journal of Educational Studies 17 (1):97-98.
  44.  2
    Computational Approaches to Color Constancy: Adaptive and Ontogenetic Considerations.James L. Dannemiller - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (2):255-266.
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  45.  23
    Are Organ Donors After Cardiac Death Really Dead?James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):122.
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  46.  7
    Familiarity Breeds Differentiation: A Subjective-Likelihood Approach to the Effects of Experience in Recognition Memory.James L. McClelland & Mark Chappell - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (4):724-760.
  47.  32
    How Much of the Brain Must Die in Brain Death?James L. Bernat - 1992 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):21.
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  48.  12
    A Distributed, Developmental Model of Word Recognition and Naming.Mark S. Seidenberg & James L. McClelland - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (4):523-568.
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  49. Quantum Theoretical Concepts of Measurement: Part I.James L. Park - 1968 - Philosophy of Science 35 (3):205-231.
    The overall purpose of this paper is to clarify the physical meaning and epistemological status of the term 'measurement' as used in quantum theory. After a review of the essential logical structure of quantum physics, Part I presents interpretive discussions contrasting the quantal concepts observable and ensemble with their classical ancestors along the lines of Margenau's latency theory. Against this background various popular ideas concerning the nature of quantum measurement are critically surveyed. The analysis reveals that, in addition to internal (...)
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  50.  25
    Medical Decision Making by Patients in the Locked-in Syndrome.James L. Bernat - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (2):229-238.
    The locked-in syndrome is a state of profound paralysis with preserved awareness of self and environment who typically results from a brain stem stroke. Although patients in LIS have great difficulty communicating, their consciousness, cognition, and language usually remain intact. Medical decision-making by LIS patients is compromised, not by cognitive impairment, but by severe communication impairment. Former systems of communication that permitted LIS patients to make only “yes” or “no” responses to questions was sufficient to validate their consent for simple (...)
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