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  1. Socrates.James M. Ambury - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Socrates (469—399 B.C.E.) Socrates is one of the few individuals whom one could say has so-shaped the cultural and intellectual development of the world that, without him, history would be profoundly different. He is best known for his association with the Socratic method of question and answer, his claim that he was ignorant (or aware of […].
     
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  2.  5
    Colloquium 3 Commentary on Kosman.James M. Ambury - 2016 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):113-117.
    In this commentary I offer a reply to Professor Aryeh Kosman’s stimulating discussion of the Euthyphro dilemma in his paper, “Why the Gods Love the Holy.” After a brief summary of the paper, I pose some specific questions for Professor Kosman’s interpretation and wonder generally about the notion of cause for which he argues. I suggest the language of Platonic Forms as an alternative to Professor Kosman’s approach, though I believe the two approaches can be reconciled. I conclude with some (...)
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  3.  17
    Chapter 7. Socratic Character: Proclus on the Function of Erotic Intellect.James M. Ambury - 2014 - In Harold Tarrant & Danielle A. Layne (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates. University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 109-117.
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    Dialectical Epimeleia: Platonic Care of the Soul and Philosophical Cognition.James M. Ambury - 2018 - Plato Journal 17.
    In this paper I argue that Plato’s notion of the care of the self is his remedy to the psychological malady he refers to as ‘wandering’. The wandering self requires care, and a close reading of the Platonic corpus indicates self-cultivation means stabilizing the soul in accordance with its intelligent nature. I then argue that Plato appropriates the ethical injunction to care for the soul and draws from it an important epistemological consequence. Specifically, his view is that a wandering soul’s (...)
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  5. Dialectical Epimeleia: Platonic Care of the Soul and Philosophical Cognition.James M. Ambury - 2017 - Plato Journal 17:85-99.
    In this paper I argue that Plato’s notion of the care of the self is his remedy to the psychological malady he refers to as ‘wandering’. The wandering self requires care, and a close reading of the Platonic corpus indicates self-cultivation means stabilizing the soul in accordance with its intelligent nature. I then argue that Plato appropriates the ethical injunction to care for the soul and draws from it an important epistemological consequence. Specifically, his view is that a wandering soul’s (...)
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    Introduction.James M. Ambury, Tushar Irani & Kathleen Wallace - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (2-3):161-165.
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  7. Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy.Andy German & James M. Ambury (eds.) - 2018 - New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy is the first volume of essays dedicated to the whole question of self-knowledge and its role in Platonic philosophy. It brings together established and rising scholars from every interpretative school of Plato studies, and a variety of texts from across Plato's corpus - including the classic discussions of self-knowledge in the Charmides and Alcibiades I, and dialogues such as the Republic, Theaetetus, and Theages, which are not often enough mined for insights about (...)
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  8.  46
    Plato’s Conception of Soul as Intelligent Self-Determination.James M. Ambury - 2015 - International Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):299-313.
    This paper articulates two seemingly distinct but interrelated conceptions of soul in the Platonic corpus: soul as self-mover and soul as self-ruler. It argues that Plato conceives of soul as a principle of intelligent self-determination. The dialogues in principal focus are the two in which the ontological soul and ethical soul are most manifest: the Phaedrus and the Laws. The article concludes with a brief reflection, by way of the Timaeus, on the relationship between soul thus understood and Plato’s sense (...)
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  9.  60
    The Failed Seduction: Alcibiades, Socrates, and the Epithumetic Comportment.James M. Ambury - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):257-274.
    In this paper I argue that Plato’s Alcibiades is the embodiment of what I call the epithumetic comportment, a way of life made possible by the naïve ontological assumption that appearance is all that is. In the first part of the paper, I read select portions of the Alcibiades I and establish a distinction between the epithumetic comportment, which desires gratification in exchange for flattery, and the erotic comportment, which desires care of the soul. In the second half of the (...)
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    The Failed Seduction: Alcibiades, Socrates, and the Epithumetic Comportment.James M. Ambury - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):257-274.
    In this paper I argue that Plato’s Alcibiades is the embodiment of what I call the epithumetic comportment, a way of life made possible by the naïve ontological assumption that appearance is all that is. In the first part of the paper, I read select portions of the Alcibiades I and establish a distinction between the epithumetic comportment, which desires gratification in exchange for flattery, and the erotic comportment, which desires care of the soul. In the second half of the (...)
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  11.  33
    The Place of Displacement: The Elenchus in Plato’s Alcibiades I.James M. Ambury - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (2):241-260.
  12.  19
    Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy.James M. Ambury & Andy German (eds.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy is the first volume of essays dedicated to the whole question of self-knowledge and its role in Platonic philosophy. It brings together established and rising scholars from every interpretative school of Plato studies, and a variety of texts from across Plato's corpus - including the classic discussions of self-knowledge in the Charmides and Alcibiades I, and dialogues such as the Republic, Theaetetus, and Theages, which are not often enough mined for insights about (...)
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