89 found
Order:
Disambiguations
James P. Scanlan [92]James Patrick Scanlan [1]
  1. Marxism in the Ussr: A Critical Survey of Current Soviet Thought.James P. Scanlan - 1985 - Cornell University Press.
  2.  22
    Populism as a Philosophical Movement in Nineteenth-Century Russia: The Thought of P. L. Lavrov and N. K. Mikhajlovskij.James P. Scanlan - 1984 - Studies in East European Thought 27 (3):209-223.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  27
    Reviews. [REVIEW]James P. Scanlan, Tom Rockmore, David B. Myers, Juliana Geran Pilon, Friedrich Rapp, Jesse Zeldin & Thomas E. Bird - 1982 - Studies in East European Thought 24 (3):257-257.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  26
    Reviews. [REVIEW]James P. Scanlan - 1997 - Studies in East European Thought 49 (3):176-184.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  47
    The Case Against Rational Egoism in Dostoevsky's Notes From Underground.James Patrick Scanlan - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (3):549-567.
  6.  16
    The New Sovietphilosophical Encyclopedia. III.James P. Scanlan - 1973 - Studies in East European Thought 13 (3-4):321-333.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  21
    Marxist Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1983 - Teaching Philosophy 6 (3):315-317.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  14
    Nikolaj Ěernyševskij and Soviet Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1967 - Studies in East European Thought 7 (1):1-27.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  39
    Reviews. [REVIEW]James P. Scanlan, William J. Gavin, Irving H. Anellis, Fred Seddon & Thomas Nemeth - 1986 - Studies in East European Thought 31 (3):93-95.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  8
    A Critique of the Engels-Soviet Version of Marxian Economic Determinism.James P. Scanlan - 1973 - Studies in Soviet Thought 13 (1-2):11-19.
    In softening Marx' economic determinism, Engels appears to have rescued it from absurdity. In fact, he has condemned it to vacuity: it seems to explain everything, while in fact explaining nothing.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  8
    The New SovietPhilosophical Encyclopedia. III.James P. Scanlan - 1973 - Studies in Soviet Thought 13 (3-4):321-333.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  18
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Richard T. de George, Lion Chernyak & James P. Scanlan - 1987 - Studies in East European Thought 33 (1):75-95.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  25
    Main Currents of Post-Soviet Philosophy in Russia.James P. Scanlan - 2001 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:121-129.
    With the destruction of the Soviet Union and the fall of the Communist Party, Russia in the past few years has experienced a philosophical revolution unparalleled in suddenness and scope. Among the salient features of this revolution are the displacement of Marxism from its former, virtually monopolistic status to a distinctly subordinate and widely scorned position; the rediscovery of Russia’s pre-Marxist and anti-Marxist philosophers, in particular the religious thinkers of the past two centuries; increasing interest in Western philosophical traditions that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  41
    Can Realism Be Socialist?James P. Scanlan - 1974 - British Journal of Aesthetics 14 (1):41-55.
  15.  7
    Nikolaj Chernyshevsky and the Philosophy of Realism in Nineteenth-Century Russian Aesthetics.James P. Scanlan - 1985 - Studies in Soviet Thought 30 (1):1-14.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  44
    A. F. Losev and Mysticism in Russian Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1994 - Studies in East European Thought 46 (4):263 - 286.
  17.  34
    The Impossibility of a Uniquely Authentic Marxist Aesthetics.James P. Scanlan - 1976 - British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (2):128-136.
  18.  6
    Nikolaj?Erny?Evskij and Soviet Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1967 - Studies in Soviet Thought 7 (1):1-27.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  6
    Populism as a Philosophical Movement in Nineteenth-Century Russia: The Thought of P. L. Lavrov and N. K. Mikhajlovskij.James P. Scanlan - 1984 - Studies in Soviet Thought 27 (3):209-223.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  6
    Yakhot and Ojzerman On?Ideology?James P. Scanlan - 1981 - Studies in Soviet Thought 22 (3):193-195.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  13
    Yakhot and Ojzerman on 'Ideology'.James P. Scanlan - 1981 - Studies in East European Thought 22 (3):193-195.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  9
    Tolstoj as Analytic Thinker: His Philosophical Defense of Nonviolence.James P. Scanlan - 2011 - Studies in East European Thought 63 (1):7 - 14.
    By way of countering Tolstoj's reputation as an alogical and inept philosophical thinker, this paper explores the tension between maximalism and reasonableness in his defense of the ethics of nonviolence. Tolstoj's writings of the last decade of his life show that he was perfectly capable of making appropriate conceptual distinctions, recognizing legitimate objections to his position, and responding rationally to them; in so doing, he made valuable points about the unpredictability of human actions, the futility of using violence to combat (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  33
    Two Camps of Theoreticians (Apropos of Day and a Bit More).James P. Scanlan - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):141-157.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  26
    Nikolaj Chernyshevsky and the Philosophy of Realism in Nineteenth-Century Russian Aesthetics.James P. Scanlan - 1985 - Studies in East European Thought 30 (1):1-14.
  25.  28
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Michael Henry, Paul Mattick, James G. Colbert, Maurice A. Finocchiaro, Mitchell Aboulafia, R. B. Louden & James P. Scanlan - 1986 - Studies in East European Thought 31 (4):265-267.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  25
    A Critique of the Engels-Soviet Version of Marxian Economic Determinism.James P. Scanlan - 1973 - Studies in East European Thought 13 (1-2):11-19.
    In softening Marx' economic determinism, Engels appears to have rescued it from absurdity. In fact, he has condemned it to vacuity: it seems to explain everything, while in fact explaining nothing.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Dostoevsky on the Existence of God.James P. Scanlan - 1999 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 44:63-71.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  18
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Józef M. Bocheński, James P. Scanlan & Ervin Laszlo - 1967 - Studies in East European Thought 7 (2):176-184.
  29.  24
    J. S. Mill and the Definition of Freedom.James P. Scanlan - 1957 - Ethics 68 (3):194-206.
  30.  2
    Peter Lavrov and the Russian Revolutionary Movement.James P. Scanlan & Philip Pomper - 1974 - History and Theory 13 (1):65.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  2
    Sovremennaia filosofiia istorii.James P. Scanlan & Eero N. Loone - 1983 - History and Theory 22 (3):311.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  10
    Phenomenology in Russia: The Contribution of Gustav Shpet. [REVIEW]James P. Scanlan - 1993 - Man and World 26 (4):467-475.
  33.  8
    A History of Russian Philosophy: From the Tenth Through the Twentieth Centuries. Volumes I and II.James P. Scanlan - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (4):627-629.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  22
    An American Philosopher at Moscow State University, 1964–1965.James P. Scanlan - 2000 - Studies in East European Thought 52 (3):185-201.
    For an American philosopher participating in a cultural exchangeprogram with the Soviet Union in 1964–65, a year spent in thePhilosophy Faculty of Moscow State University, studying and doingresearch in the history of Russian philosophy, provided manyinteresting insights – some of them surprising – into the theoryand practice of Marxism-Leninism and the nature of philosophicaleducation in Russia in the 1960s.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  6
    Legal Philosophies of Russian Liberalism.James P. Scanlan - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (3):642-644.
  36.  3
    Philip Pomper, "Peter Lavrov and the Russian Revolutionary Movement". [REVIEW]James P. Scanlan - 1974 - History and Theory 13 (1):65.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  11
    Nicholas Chernyshevsky and Philosophical Materialism in Russia.James P. Scanlan - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1):65-86.
  38.  9
    Book Review:Classical Anarchism: The Political Thought of Godwin, Proudhon, Bakunin, and Kropotkin. George Crowder. [REVIEW]James P. Scanlan - 1996 - Ethics 106 (3):646-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1992 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):3-7.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1993 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 31 (4):3-8.
    A previous issue of this journal examined the contemporary resurgence, as Russians reflect on the historical fate of their country and its prospects, of the old theme of "Russia and the West," and in particular the question of the relevance and value to Russia of Western ideas and institutions. The articles in that issue, for the most part, reflected the position of thinkers who find the West an appropriate model for Russia's future. The present issue, by contrast, is devoted to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1987 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):3-6.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):3-5.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (1):3-5.
    Among the principal manifestations of glasnost' in Soviet intellectual life today is the publication of writers who earlier were denied a broad forum for the expression of their views. In the sphere of philosophy, one such writer is Iakov Mil'ner-Irinin, with whose article on the concept of human nature in ethics the present issue begins. Mil'ner-Irinin, a philosopher who has worked as an editor at the publishing house of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, has long advocated an approach to ethics (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):3-5.
    Along with other Soviet publications, Soviet philosophy journals are opening their pages to a greater variety of points of view as part of the campaign for perestroika and glasnost' in the USSR. Mikhail Gorbachev has personally criticized Soviet journals for limiting themselves to like-minded contributors, and has urged the introduction of new voices in the interest of what he calls "socialist pluralism.".
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (2):3-5.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (4):3-5.
    In the past few years, as previous issues of this journal have indicated, the interest of Soviet philosophers in the history of their philosophical heritage has broadened to include figures and topics previously slighted or altogether ignored. Non-Marxist traditions in Russian thought have been rediscovered, and once closed Marxist doctrines have been reopened for questioning. The present issue is devoted to some of the more recent manifestations of this renewed attention to philosophical views that diverge from Marxism or from earlier (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1991 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):3-5.
    Two of the principal preoccupations of Soviet philosophers in the present day are topics that could not be subjected to serious philosophical examination in the preglasnost period—one because it was considered devoid of intellectual merit, and the other because its merit was held to be beyond question. The first topic is Russian religious philosophy of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the second is the philosophy of Karl Marx.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (3):3-5.
    A prominent contribution of Soviet philosophy journals to the reform movement now under way in the USSR is the publication of articles analyzing the ills of present-day Soviet society. One of the more outspoken and probing of these critiques is that of the historian Andranik Migranian, published in Voprosy filosofii [Problems of Philosophy] in 1987 and translated as the opening article in this issue of Soviet Studies in Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 28 (2):3-5.
    The reforms currently under way in many spheres of Soviet social and cultural life are aimed at altering institutions and practices that have evolved over many decades. For that reason, a significant feature of the thinking behind the reforms is its attention to the past—to the missed opportunities, forgotten values, and accumulated sins and errors that have led to the present predicament of the USSR.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1991 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 30 (2):3-6.
    Even before the mass defections from the Communist Party and its ideology that followed the abortive coup of August 1991, many Soviet philosophers had voiced dissatisfaction with Marxist philosophy, as we have seen in previous issues of this journal. Generally, however, it was the Marxism of Stalin and Lenin that bore the brunt of the criticism, with only a few bold writers like Aleksandr Tsipko attacking the Marxism of Marx himself.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 89