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James P. Scanlan [92]James Patrick Scanlan [2]
  1.  1
    Marxism in the Ussr: A Critical Survey of Current Soviet Thought.James P. Scanlan - 1985 - Cornell University Press.
  2.  12
    Dostoevsky the Thinker.James P. Scanlan - 2004 - Studies in East European Thought 56 (1):76-79.
  3. The Case Against Rational Egoism in Dostoevsky's "Notes From Underground".James Patrick Scanlan - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (3):549.
  4.  31
    J. S. Mill and the Definition of Freedom.James P. Scanlan - 1957 - Ethics 68 (3):194-206.
  5.  65
    Classical Anarchism: The Political Thought of Godwin, Proudhon, Bakunin, and Kropotkin.James P. Scanlan - 1996 - Ethics 106 (3):646-647.
  6.  49
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Michael Henry, Paul Mattick, James G. Colbert, Maurice A. Finocchiaro, Mitchell Aboulafia, R. B. Louden & James P. Scanlan - 1986 - Studies in East European Thought 31 (4):265-267.
  7.  49
    A. F. Losev and Mysticism in Russian Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1994 - Studies in East European Thought 46 (4):263 - 286.
  8.  30
    Phenomenology in Russia: The Contribution of Gustav Shpet. [REVIEW]James P. Scanlan - 1993 - Man and World 26 (4):467-475.
  9.  23
    Nikolaj Ěernyševskij and Soviet Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1967 - Studies in East European Thought 7 (1):1-27.
  10.  17
    Nikolaj?Erny?Evskij and Soviet Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1967 - Studies in Soviet Thought 7 (1):1-27.
  11. Marxism and Religion in Eastern Europe Papers Presented at the Banff International Slavic Conference, September 4-7, 1974. [REVIEW]Richard T. De George & James P. Scanlan - 1975 - D. Reidel Pub. Co.
     
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  12.  27
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Richard T. de George, Lion Chernyak & James P. Scanlan - 1987 - Studies in East European Thought 33 (1):75-95.
  13. Russian Philosophy; An Historical Anthology.James M. Edie, James P. Scanlan, Mary-Barbara Zeldin & George L. Kline - 1966 - Studies in Soviet Thought 6 (1):51-52.
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  14. A History of Young Russia.M. O. Gershenzon, James P. Scanlan & Edna Lippman Lief - 1986 - Charles Schlacks Jr.
     
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  15. A History of Young Russia.Michael Gershenzon, James P. Scanlan & Edna Lippman Lief - 1991 - Studies in Soviet Thought 41 (1):70-76.
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  16.  28
    An American Philosopher at Moscow State University, 1964–1965.James P. Scanlan - 2000 - Studies in East European Thought 52 (3):185-201.
    For an American philosopher participating in a cultural exchangeprogram with the Soviet Union in 1964–65, a year spent in thePhilosophy Faculty of Moscow State University, studying and doingresearch in the history of Russian philosophy, provided manyinteresting insights – some of them surprising – into the theoryand practice of Marxism-Leninism and the nature of philosophicaleducation in Russia in the 1960s.
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  17.  42
    A Critique of the Engels-Soviet Version of Marxian Economic Determinism.James P. Scanlan - 1973 - Studies in East European Thought 13 (1-2):11-19.
    In softening Marx' economic determinism, Engels appears to have rescued it from absurdity. In fact, he has condemned it to vacuity: it seems to explain everything, while in fact explaining nothing.
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  18.  10
    A Critique of the Engels-Soviet Version of Marxian Economic Determinism.James P. Scanlan - 1973 - Studies in Soviet Thought 13 (1-2):11-19.
    In softening Marx' economic determinism, Engels appears to have rescued it from absurdity. In fact, he has condemned it to vacuity: it seems to explain everything, while in fact explaining nothing.
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  19.  15
    A History of Russian Philosophy: From the Tenth Through the Twentieth Centuries. Volumes I and II.James P. Scanlan - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (4):627-629.
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  20.  54
    Can Realism Be Socialist?James P. Scanlan - 1974 - British Journal of Aesthetics 14 (1):41-55.
  21. Dialectics in Contemporary Soviet Philosophy.James P. Scanlan - 1982 - Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
     
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  22. Dostoevsky on the Existence of God.James P. Scanlan - 1999 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 44:63-71.
     
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  23.  8
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1994 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 32 (4):3-5.
    Russian social and political philosophy of the post-Soviet period continues to be dominated by the vexed question, already featured in the Fall 1992 and several subsequent issues of this journal, of Russia's likeness or unlikeness to the developed democratic societies of the West. The articles in the present issue focus on several closely interrelated aspects of this broad question: Is there a peculiarly Russian route to social reconstruction? What are the prospects, if any, for liberalism and civil society in Russia? (...)
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  24.  2
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1992 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):3-7.
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  25.  3
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1993 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 31 (4):3-8.
    A previous issue of this journal examined the contemporary resurgence, as Russians reflect on the historical fate of their country and its prospects, of the old theme of "Russia and the West," and in particular the question of the relevance and value to Russia of Western ideas and institutions. The articles in that issue, for the most part, reflected the position of thinkers who find the West an appropriate model for Russia's future. The present issue, by contrast, is devoted to (...)
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  26.  12
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1992 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):3-7.
    After thirty years as Soviet Studies in Philosophy, this journal begins a new volume year with a new name—Russian Studies in Philosophy. The title change reflects not a shift in content but simply the disappearance of the term "Soviet" from the world map. Even before the dissolution of the USSR, items selected for translation in this journal were drawn exclusively from Russian-language Soviet publications, though the authors were not always Russians: they have included Ukrainians, Armenians, Georgians, and representatives of other (...)
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  27.  2
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1987 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):3-6.
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  28.  11
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):3-5.
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  29.  5
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (1):3-5.
    Among the principal manifestations of glasnost' in Soviet intellectual life today is the publication of writers who earlier were denied a broad forum for the expression of their views. In the sphere of philosophy, one such writer is Iakov Mil'ner-Irinin, with whose article on the concept of human nature in ethics the present issue begins. Mil'ner-Irinin, a philosopher who has worked as an editor at the publishing house of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, has long advocated an approach to ethics (...)
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  30. Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1987 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 26 (3):3-5.
    The articles included in the present issue of Soviet Studies in Philosophy are drawn entirely from two recent issues of Voprosy filosofii, the oldest and most widely read Soviet philosophy journal. The items have been selected in an effort to provide a picture of that journal's current status and objectives, both as described by its editors and as reflected in the scope and character of some of its philosophically most interesting contents.
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  31.  4
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):3-5.
    Along with other Soviet publications, Soviet philosophy journals are opening their pages to a greater variety of points of view as part of the campaign for perestroika and glasnost' in the USSR. Mikhail Gorbachev has personally criticized Soviet journals for limiting themselves to like-minded contributors, and has urged the introduction of new voices in the interest of what he calls "socialist pluralism.".
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  32.  3
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (2):3-5.
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  33.  7
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (4):3-5.
    In the past few years, as previous issues of this journal have indicated, the interest of Soviet philosophers in the history of their philosophical heritage has broadened to include figures and topics previously slighted or altogether ignored. Non-Marxist traditions in Russian thought have been rediscovered, and once closed Marxist doctrines have been reopened for questioning. The present issue is devoted to some of the more recent manifestations of this renewed attention to philosophical views that diverge from Marxism or from earlier (...)
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  34.  2
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1991 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):3-5.
    Two of the principal preoccupations of Soviet philosophers in the present day are topics that could not be subjected to serious philosophical examination in the preglasnost period—one because it was considered devoid of intellectual merit, and the other because its merit was held to be beyond question. The first topic is Russian religious philosophy of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the second is the philosophy of Karl Marx.
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  35. Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1990 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):3-5.
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  36.  10
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1988 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (3):3-5.
    A prominent contribution of Soviet philosophy journals to the reform movement now under way in the USSR is the publication of articles analyzing the ills of present-day Soviet society. One of the more outspoken and probing of these critiques is that of the historian Andranik Migranian, published in Voprosy filosofii [Problems of Philosophy] in 1987 and translated as the opening article in this issue of Soviet Studies in Philosophy.
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  37.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 28 (2):3-5.
    The reforms currently under way in many spheres of Soviet social and cultural life are aimed at altering institutions and practices that have evolved over many decades. For that reason, a significant feature of the thinking behind the reforms is its attention to the past—to the missed opportunities, forgotten values, and accumulated sins and errors that have led to the present predicament of the USSR.
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  38.  10
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1991 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 30 (2):3-6.
    Even before the mass defections from the Communist Party and its ideology that followed the abortive coup of August 1991, many Soviet philosophers had voiced dissatisfaction with Marxist philosophy, as we have seen in previous issues of this journal. Generally, however, it was the Marxism of Stalin and Lenin that bore the brunt of the criticism, with only a few bold writers like Aleksandr Tsipko attacking the Marxism of Marx himself.
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  39.  10
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1992 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 31 (3):3-6.
    The articles in this issue of Russian Studies in Philosophy are drawn exclusively from two new philosophical journals published in Moscow—Nachala [Beginnings] and Paralleli [Parallels]. Both began publication in 1991, after glasnost' had made possible the dissemination of philosophical views other than Marxism-Leninism. They are part of a vigorous expansion in the number of philosophical publications in Russia in recent years—an expansion that became particularly intense after the breakup of the USSR and the demise of the Communist Party at the (...)
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  40.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1990 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 29 (2):3-5.
    Although Soviet philosophers today are virtually unanimous in condemning Stalinism, which they see as not only a failed ideology but the source of monstrous evils in Soviet life, they disagree sharply on the intellectual sources of that ideology. Was it a perversion of authentic Marxism, a departure from the true principles of Marx and Lenin, for which only the megalomaniac Stalin and his followers can be blamed? Or was it a logical continuation of tendencies inherent in Marxism-Leninism, so that Stalin's (...)
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  41.  8
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1990 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 29 (3):3-5.
    The articles in this issue, all drawn from the most widely read Soviet journals of philosophy, offer further evidence of how much the Soviet intellectual scene has changed in just a few short years.
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  42.  6
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1994 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 33 (3):3-5.
    Although heavily overshadowed by renewed study of the religious tradition in Russian philosophy, another tradition that paralleled and sometimes intersected with it is also drawing attention among contemporary Russian philosophers interested in mining the intellectual legacy of the past for ideas applicable to their postcommunist situation. This is the tradition of liberalism in Russian political and legal philosophy, neglected thus far in this journal except for an article on Boris Chicherin by Sergei Chizhkov in the Winter 1991-92 issue and an (...)
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  43.  10
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1995 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 34 (2):3-6.
    The years since the collapse of Communist authority in Russia have seen the public emergence of several outstanding scholars whose non-Marxist or anti-Marxist views did not allow them to pursue professional careers in philosophy, or even to publish their philosophical writings, during the Soviet era. One of the most respected of these figures is Sergei Sergeevich Khoruzhii, an associate of the Steklov Mathematics Institute in Moscow, who is known to philosophers as one of the new Russia's foremost authorities on the (...)
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  44.  7
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1995 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 33 (4):3-5.
    The collapse of Marxism has left Russia with what many describeas an "ideological vacuum," the implication being that some other single, comprehensive world view either should or inevitably will take the place of the Communist ideology. Nikolai Kosolapov addresses this subject in the lead article of the present issue, analyzing the concept of ideology and examining the question of whether any country has need of an "integrative" or commonly shared, unifying outlook. Kosolapov believes that Russia, as a great nation aspiring (...)
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  45.  1
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1991 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):3-5.
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  46.  3
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1993 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 32 (3):3-5.
    The astonishingly rapid and complete collapse of Communist ideology in Russia was accompanied, understandably, by the collapse of the philosophical authority of Karl Marx. Initially only Stalin was blamed for Russia's ills, on grounds that he had distorted Marxism-Leninism; soon, however, Lenin was blamed for distorting Marxism; and the regress quickly ended when Marx himself was charged with a share of the responsibility for the evils that were perpetrated in Russia in his name. From his position as font of all (...)
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  47.  10
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1995 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 34 (3):3-5.
    In the last issue of Russian Studies in Philosophy, Sergei Khoruzhii discussed Eurasianism as one of the "transformations" of Slavophilism in twentieth-century Russian thought, with emphasis on the Eurasian movement's origins among Russian émigrés in the 1920s. The present issue is devoted entirely to recent Russian studies of Eurasianism by Khoruzhii and others, examining the movement both as a historical phenomenon and as a set of ideas with renewed appeal in Russian intellectual life today.
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  48.  2
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1996 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 35 (3):3-5.
    Perhaps in no other European culture have philosophy and literature existed in such close symbiosis as in Russia. Virtually without exception the great Russian writers have had strong philosophical interests, and that circumstance, coupled with the relatively weak development of academic or "professional" philosophy in Russia, worked to produce a national philosophical culture in which literary figures loom large. Whether or not we agree with some Russian commentators that true Russian philosophy can be found only in literary works, we must (...)
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  49.  3
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1996 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 35 (2):3-5.
    Russian social and political philosophy of the post-Soviet period continues to be dominated by the vexed question, already featured in the Fall 1992 and several subsequent issues of this journal, of Russia's likeness or unlikeness to the developed democratic societies of the West. The articles in the present issue focus on several closely interrelated aspects of this broad question: Is there a peculiarly Russian route to social reconstruction? What are the prospects, if any, for liberalism and civil society in Russia? (...)
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  50.  9
    Editor's Introduction.James P. Scanlan - 1995 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):3-6.
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