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  1.  59
    Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Who Should Intervene?James Pattison - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This book considers who should undertake humanitarian intervention in response to an ongoing or impending humanitarian crisis. It develops a normative account of legitimacy to assess not only current interveners, but also the desirability of potential reforms to the mechanisms and agents of humanitarian intervention.
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  2.  35
    Deeper Objections to the Privatisation of Military Force.James Pattison - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (4):425-447.
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  3.  85
    Is There a Duty to Intervene? Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect.James Pattison - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (6):570-579.
    This article considers the duty to undertake humanitarian intervention. It first examines the arguments for the duty to intervene and questions the possibility of supererogatory humanitarian intervention. It then considers the leading objections to this duty which, it is argued, are largely unpersuasive. In the final section, the article considers the duty to intervene in the context of the responsibility to protect doctrine, which provides the framework within which debates about humanitarian intervention now in large part occur.
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  4. Just War Theory and the Privatization of Military Force.James Pattison - 2008 - Ethics and International Affairs 22 (2):143–162.
    The use of private military companies (PMCs) has become increasingly prevalent, with such firms as Blackwater, MPRI, and DynCorp taking over a growing number of roles traditionally performed by the regular military. This article uses the framework of just war theory (JWT) to consider the central normative issues raised by this privatization of military force. In particular, I first examine the claim that private contractors are inappropriate actors to wage war because they contravene the JWT principle of right intention. The (...)
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  5. Whose Responsibility to Protect? The Duties of Humanitarian Intervention.James Pattison - 2008 - Journal of Military Ethics 7 (4):262-283.
    The International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty's report, The Responsibility to Protect, argues that when a state is unable or unwilling to uphold its citizens? basic human rights, such as in cases of genocide, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity, the international community has a responsibility to protect these citizens by undertaking humanitarian intervention. An essential issue, however, remains unresolved: which particular agent in the international community has the duty to intervene? In this article, I critically examine four ways (...)
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  6.  18
    The Morality of Sanctions.James Pattison - 2015 - Social Philosophy and Policy 32 (1):192-215.
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  7.  9
    The Ethics of Arming Rebels.James Pattison - 2015 - Ethics and International Affairs 29 (4):455-471.
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  8.  10
    Humanitarian Intervention and a Cosmopolitan UN Force.James Pattison - 2008 - Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):126-145.
    The current mechanisms and agents of humanitarian intervention are inadequate. As the crisis in Darfur has highlighted, the international community lacks both the willingness to undertake humanitarian intervention and the ability to do so legitimately. This article considers a cosmopolitan solution to these problems: the creation of a standing army for the United Nations. There have been a number of proposals for such a force, including many recently. However, they contain two central flaws: the force proposed would be, firstly, too (...)
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  9.  20
    Representativeness and Humanitarian Intervention.James Pattison - 2007 - Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):569–587.
  10.  11
    Humanitarian Intervention and International Law: The Moral Importance of an Intervener’s Legal Status.James Pattison - 2007 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 10 (3):301-319.
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  11.  51
    The Principled Case for Employing Private Military and Security Companies in Interventions for Human Rights Purposes.Deane-Peter Baker & James Pattison - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):1-18.
    The possibility of using private military and security companies to bolster the capacity to undertake intervention for human rights purposes has been increasingly debated. The focus of such discussions has, however, largely been on practical issues and the contingent problems posed by private force. By contrast, this article considers the principled case for privatising humanitarian intervention. It focuses on two central issues. First, does outsourcing humanitarian intervention to private military and security companies pose some fundamental, deeper problems in this context, (...)
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  12. When Is It Right to Fight? Just War Theory and the Individual-Centric Approach.James Pattison - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):35-54.
    Recent work in the ethics of war has done much to challenge the collectivism of the convention-based, Walzerian just war theory. In doing so, it raises the question of when it is permissible for soldiers to resort to force. This article considers this issue and, in doing so, argues that the rejection of collectivism in just war should go further still. More specifically, it defends the ‘Individual-Centric Approach’ to the deep morality of war, which asserts that the justifiability of an (...)
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  13.  89
    The Ethics of Humanitarian Intervention in Libya.James Pattison - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):271-277.
    The moral permissibility of the intervention in Libya largely turns on two fairly tricky assessments: whether the situation was sufficiently serious at the time the intervention was launched and what the predominant purposes of the intervention were.
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  14.  12
    The Case for the Nonideal Morality of War: Beyond Revisionism Versus Traditionalism in Just War Theory.James Pattison - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (2):242-268.
    Recent discussions in Just War Theory have been framed by a polarising debate between “traditionalist” and “revisionist” approaches. This debate has largely overlooked the importance of an applied account of Just War Theory. The main aim of this essay is to defend the importance of this applied account and, in particular, a nonideal account of the ethics of war. I argue that the applied, nonideal morality of war is vital for a plausible and comprehensive account of Just War Theory. A (...)
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  15.  10
    Introduction.James Pattison - 2013 - In John Lippitt & George Pattison (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Kierkegaard. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-4.
  16. Covert Positive Incentives as an Alternative to War.James Pattison - 2018 - Ethics and International Affairs 32 (3):293-303.
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  17. Introduction.James Pattison - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):251-254.
    Three central questions lie at the heart of this roundtable. First, what are the implications of Libya for the RtoP doctrine? Second, how should we judge the intervention in Libya morally and politically? Third, what is the likelihood of future action under RtoP?
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  18. Introduction.James Pattison - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3).
    Three central questions lie at the heart of this roundtable. First, what are the implications of Libya for the RtoP doctrine? Second, how should we judge the intervention in Libya morally and politically? Third, what is the likelihood of future action under RtoP?
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  19. Introduction.James Pattison - 2018 - Ethics and International Affairs 32 (3):279-281.
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  20. Just War Theory and the Privatization of Military Force.James Pattison - 2008 - Ethics and International Affairs 22 (2).
    Private military companies are taking over a growing number of roles traditionally performed by the regular military. This article uses the framework of just war theory to consider the central normative issues raised by this privatization of military force.
     
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  21. The Alternatives to War: From Sanctions to Nonviolence.James Pattison - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the ethics of the alternatives to war. It assesses the moral case for each of the alternative in their own right, and provides an overall assessment of the alternatives to war.
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  22. The Ethics of Humanitarian Intervention in Libya.James Pattison - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3).
    The moral permissibility of the intervention in Libya largely turns on two fairly tricky assessments: whether the situation was sufficiently serious at the time the intervention was launched and what the predominant purposes of the intervention were.
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  23.  6
    The Morality of Private War: The Challenge of Private Military and Security Companies.James Pattison - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    The private military industry has been growing rapidly since the end of the Cold War. The Morality of Private War uses normative political theory to assess the leading moral arguments for and against the use of private military and security companies.
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