Order:
  1.  5
    14 Analepsis / Prolepsis.James Phelan - 2016 - In Joel Burges & Amy Elias (eds.), Time: A Vocabulary of the Present. New York University Press. pp. 240-254.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  17
    Meaning as Concept and Extension: Some Problems.James L. Battersby & James Phelan - 1986 - Critical Inquiry 12 (3):605-615.
    Hirsch’s revision results from his attempt to think through the difficult question that underlies the whole essay: How does the movement of time and circumstance affect the stability of meaning? The first part of his answer is that the relation between original meaning and subsequent understanding or applications of that meaning is analogous to the relation between a concept and its extension. For example, if he reads Shakespeare’s sonnet 55 and applies it to his beloved, and one of us reads (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  14
    Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader.Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young (eds.) - 2005 - Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  21
    What Do We Owe Texts? Respect, Irreverence, or Nothing at All?James R. Kincaid & James Phelan - 1999 - Critical Inquiry 25 (4):758-783.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  40
    Dual focalization, retrospective fictional autobiography, and the ethics of Lolita.James Phelan - 2003 - In Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press. pp. 129--145.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  55
    Is King Lear Like the Pacific Ocean or the Washington Monument?James Phelan - 1990 - The Monist 73 (3):421-436.
    There are two prominent features of contemporary literary criticism that give the pluralist his initial direction. First, the field is marked by a multiplicity of discourses: formalism, deconstruction, new historicism, feminism, Marxism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, to name just a few, as well as various syntheses of two or more of these discourses. Second, the dominant activity of literary critics is, as it has been since the rise of the New Criticism in the 1930s, the interpretation of individual texts. When faced with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Narrative as Argument in Atul Gawande’s “On Washing Hands” and “Letting Go”.James Phelan - 2017 - In Paula Olmos (ed.), Narration as Argument. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  13
    Data, Danda, and Disagreement. [REVIEW]James Phelan - 1983 - Diacritics 13 (2):39.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark