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James R. Mensch [28]James Richard Mensch [5]
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Profile: James Mensch (Charles University, Prague)
  1.  7
    Ethics and Selfhood: Alterity and the Phenomenology of Obligation.James R. Mensch - 2003 - State University of New York Press.
    Argues that a coherent theory of ethics requires an account of selfhood.
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  2.  9
    Postfoundational Phenomenology: Husserlian Reflections on Presence and Embodiment.James R. Mensch - 2000 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This book offers a fresh look at Edmund Husserl’s philosophy as a nonfoundational approach to understanding the self as an embodied presence. Contrary to the conventional view of Husserl as carrying on the Cartesian tradition of seeking a trustworthy foundation for knowledge in the "pure" observations of a disembodied ego, James Mensch introduces us to the Husserl who, anticipating the later investigations of Merleau-Ponty, explored how the body functions to determine our self-presence, our freedom, and our sense of time. The (...)
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  3.  10
    Violence and Existence: An Examination of Carl Schmitt’s Philosophy.James R. Mensch - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (2):249-268.
    This article examines the concept of existence underlying Carl Schmitt’s political philosophy—a concept is that Heidegger largely shares. Can such a conception do justice to our political life? Or is it, in fact, inimical to it? The crucial issue here is that of political identity and the role that violence plays in its formation. The article concludes by examining Jan Patočka’s account of existence as motion and applying it to our political commitments.
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  4. An Objective Phenomenology: Husserl Sees Colors.James R. Mensch - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25 (January):231-260.
  5.  25
    Instincts — a Husserlian Account.James R. Mensch - 1997 - Husserl Studies 14 (3):219-237.
    According to the standard, accepted view of Husserl, the notion of a Husserlian account of the instincts appears paradoxical. Is not Husserl the proponent of a philosophy conducted by a “pure” observer? Instincts relate to the body, but the reduction seems to leave us with a disembodied Cartesian ego. Quotations are not lacking to support this view.
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  6.  34
    Phenomenology and Artificial Intelligence: Husserl Learns Chinese.James R. Mensch - 1991 - Husserl Studies 8 (2):107-127.
    For over a decade John Searle's ingenious argument against the possibility of artificial intelligence has held a prominent place in contemporary philosophy. This is not just because of its striking central example and the apparent simplicity of its argument. As its appearance in Scientific American testifies, it is also due to its importance to the wider scientific community. If Searle is right, artificial intelligence in the strict sense, the sense that would claim that mind can be instantiated through a formal (...)
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  7.  67
    Multiple Personality Disorder: A Phenomenological/Postmodern Account.James R. Mensch - manuscript
    A striking feature of post-modernism is its distrust of the subject. If the modern period, beginning with Descartes, sought in the subject a source of certainty, an Archimedian point from which all else could be derived, post- modernism has taken the opposite tack. Rather than taking the self as a foundation, it has seen it as founded, as dependent on the accidents which situate consciousness in the world. The same holds for the unity of the subject. Modernity, in its search (...)
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  8.  50
    Freedom and Selfhood.James R. Mensch - 1997 - Husserl Studies 14 (1):41-59.
    Freedom is a perennial topic of philosophy. It is also one of themost puzzling. Regarding it, we are tempted to say with Augustine, “I know well enough what it is, provided that nobody asks me.” 1 We can all sense its presence.We use the word constantly, yet an account of it seems to elude us.My purpose in this paper is to see if phenomenology can provide such an account, one that includes in its description the features philosophers ascribe to freedom. (...)
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  9.  19
    The Phenomenological Status of the Ego.James R. Mensch - 2009 - Idealistic Studies 39 (1-3):1-9.
    For phenomenology, the study of appearances and the ways they come together to present a world, the question of the ego presents special difficulties. The ego, itself, is not an appearance; it is the subject to whom appearances appear. As such, it cannot appear. As the neo-Kantian, Paul Natorp expresses this:“The ego is the subjective center of relation for all contents in my consciousness. . . . It cannot itself be a content and resembles nothing that could be a content (...)
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  10. The Question of Being in Husserl's Logical Investigations.James R. Mensch - 1981 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  11.  31
    Husserl's Concept of the Future.James R. Mensch - 1999 - Husserl Studies 16 (1):41-64.
    At first glance, a phenomenological account of the future seems a contradiction in terms. Phenomenology’s focus is on givenness or presence. Attending to what has already been given in its search for evidence, it seems incapable of handling the future, which by definition, has not yet been given since it not-yet-present. Thus, for the existentialists, in particular Heidegger, phenomenology misses the fact that the Da-, the “thereness” of our Dasein, is located in the future. It misses the futurity inherent in (...)
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  12.  20
    Husserl and Sartre.James R. Mensch - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Research 19:147-184.
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  13.  16
    Patočka's Conception of the Subject of Human Rights.James R. Mensch - 2011 - Idealistic Studies 41 (1-2):1-10.
    Jan Patočka appears as a paradoxical figure. A champion of human rights, he often presents his philosophy in quite traditional terms. He speaks of the “soul,” its “care,” and of “living in truth.” Yet, in his proposal for an “asubjective” phenomenology, he undermines the traditional notion of the self that has such rights. The question that thus confronts a reader of Patočka is how to reconcile the Patočka who was a spokesman of the Charter 77 movement with the proponent of (...)
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  14.  3
    Radical Evil and the Ontological Difference Between Being and Beings.James Richard Mensch - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 4:487-492.
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  15.  14
    The Mind-Body Problem.James R. Mensch - 1994 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (1):31-56.
  16.  14
    Aristotle and the Overcoming of the Subject-Object Dichotomy.James R. Mensch - 1991 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 65 (4):465-482.
  17.  8
    An Objective Phenomenology.James R. Mensch - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:231-260.
    This paper proposes an explanatory bridge between structures of processing and qualia. It shows how the process of their arising is such that qualia are nonpublic objects, i.e., are only accessible to the person experiencing them. My basic premise is that the subjective “felt” character of qualia is a function of this first-person character. The account I provide is basically Husserlian. Thus, I use Husserl’s analyses to show why qualia always refer to a single point of view, that of a (...)
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  18. The Neighbor in the Self.James R. Mensch - unknown
    There is a famous passage in the Gospels, where a lawyer questions Jesus with regard to the command to love God with one's whole heart and to love ones neighbour `as oneself.' The lawyer asks, 'And who is my neighbour?' (Luke 10:2 [1]). Is he someone who lives close by or a co-religionist or is he a stranger, a follower of a different faith as Jesus suggests by answering with the parable of the good Samaritan? The 'religions of the book (...)
     
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  19. Husserlian Reflections On Embodiment.James Richard Mensch - unknown
    To say we are present to ourselves through our bodies is to express something so obvious that most people hardly give it a thought. Philosophers, however, came late to this recognition. The idea that our embodiment shapes our apprehensions seemed to Descartes to designate a problem rather than a topic of study. His effort was to overcome embodiment, that is, to reach a realm where the unencumbered mind could confront the world. The same prejudice informed the modern tradition he founded. (...)
     
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  20.  2
    The Mind-Body Problem: Phenomenological Reflections on an Ancient Solution.James R. Mensch - 1994 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (1):31-56.
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  21.  6
    Temporality and the Alterity of Space.James R. Mensch - 2013 - Idealistic Studies 43 (3):121-131.
  22. Contents.James R. Mensch - unknown
    Socrates taught that philosophy begins with conversation, with the questioning and response that marks dialectic. This book also developed through a serious of conversations. Thus, acknowledgment is above all due to those with whom I shared and developed the themes of the present work. I am grateful, first of all, to Dr. Barabara Weber of the University of Regensburg, with whom I worked out the conceptions of the central chapter of this book, “Public Space, during a daylong conversation in Strasbourg. (...)
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  23.  5
    Robert Barry, Op.James R. Mensch - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (1).
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  24.  3
    Instruction to Authors 279–283 Index to Volume 20 285–286.Christian Lotz, Corinne Painter, Sebastian Luft, Harry P. Reeder, Semantic Texture, Luciano Boi, Questions Regarding Husserlian Geometry, James R. Mensch & Postfoundational Phenomenology Husserlian - 2004 - Husserl Studies 20:285-286.
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  25.  3
    American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 518.James Richard Mensch, Richard Peddicord, Philip J. Rossi & Lynne Sharpe - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3).
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  26.  1
    After Modernity: Husserlian Reflections on a Philosophical Tradition.James Richard Mensch - 1999 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 59 (2):550-553.
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  27.  1
    Husserl and Sartre: A Question of Reason.James R. Mensch - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Research 19:147-184.
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  28. What Should We Pray For.James R. Mensch - unknown
    difficulty is that the gods neither need nor depend on our sacrifices (13c). What benefit could the..
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  29.  9
    After Modernity: Husserlian Reflections on a Philosophical Tradition.James R. Mensch - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Offers an alternative to the modern foundationalist paradigm, based in Husserl's analysis of temporality, that shows how the passing of modernity provides an opening for doing metaphysics in a new nonfoundationalist manner.
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  30. After Modernity. Husserlian Reflections on a Philosophical Tradition.James Richard Mensch - 1997 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 187 (1):81-81.
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  31. Knowing and Being: A Postmodern Reversal.James R. Mensch - 1966 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Everyone knows that "postmodernism" implies pluralism, anti-foundationalism, and, generally,a postnormative view of the self and reality. While many embrace it, few bother to tell us what is wrong with modernity. What are the problems that brought about its crisis and ultimate demise as a philosophical and cultural movement? What are the lessons for the postmodern movement that can he drawn from them? James Mensch here explains why modernism failed as a viable philosophical enterprise and how postmodernism must be understood if (...)
     
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  32. Levinas's Existential Analytic: A Commentary on Totality and Infinity.James R. Mensch - 2015 - Northwestern University Press.
    By virtue of the originality and depth of its thought, Emmanuel Levinas’s masterpiece, _Totality and Infinity: An Essay on Exteriority, _is destined to endure as one of the great works of philosophy. It is an essential text for understanding Levinas’s discussion of “the Other,” yet it is known as a “difficult” book. Modeled after Norman Kemp Smith’s commentary on _Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, Levinas’s Existential Analytic _guides both new and experienced readers through Levinas’s text. James R. Mensch explicates Levinas’s (...)
     
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  33. Prayer as Kenosis.James R. Mensch - 2005 - In Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.), The Phenomenology of Prayer. Fordham University Press.
     
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