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  1. Stakes and Kidneys: Why Markets in Human Body Parts Are Morally Imperative.James Stacey Taylor - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (225):627-629.
     
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  2.  71
    Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy.James Stacey Taylor (ed.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Autonomy has recently become one of the central concepts in contemporary moral philosophy and has generated much debate over its nature and value. This 2005 volume brings together essays that address the theoretical foundations of the concept of autonomy, as well as essays that investigate the relationship between autonomy and moral responsibility, freedom, political philosophy, and medical ethics. Written by some of the most prominent philosophers working in these areas, this book represents research on the nature and value of autonomy (...)
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  3.  82
    Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics.James Stacey Taylor - 2012 - Routledge.
    _Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics_ offers a highly distinctive and original approach to the metaphysics of death and applies this approach to contemporary debates in bioethics that address end-of-life and post-mortem issues. Taylor defends the controversial Epicurean view that death is not a harm to the person who dies and the neo-Epicurean thesis that persons cannot be affected by events that occur after their deaths, and hence that posthumous harms are impossible. He then extends this argument by asserting that the (...)
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  4.  41
    Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics.James Stacey Taylor - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):636-637.
    If pressed to identify the philosophical foundations of contemporary bioethics, most bioethicists would cite the four-principles approach developed by Tom L Beauchamp and James F Childress,1 or perhaps the ethical theories of JS Mill2 or Immanuel Kant.3 Few would cite Aristotle's metaphysical views surrounding death and posthumous harm.4 Nevertheless, many contemporary bioethical discussions are implicitly grounded in the Aristotelian views that death is a harm to the one who dies, and that persons can be harmed, or wronged, by events that (...)
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  5.  13
    The Irrelevance of Harm for a Theory of Disease.Dane Muckler & James Stacey Taylor - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):332-349.
    Normativism holds that there is a close conceptual link between disease and disvalue. We challenge normativism by advancing an argument against a popular normativist theory, Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction account. Wakefield maintains that medical disorders are breakdowns in evolved mechanisms that cause significant harm to the organism. We argue that Wakefield’s account is not a promising way to distinguish between disease and health because being harmful is neither necessary nor sufficient for a dysfunction to be a disorder. Counterexamples to the (...)
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  6. Autonomy and Informed Consent: A Much Misunderstood Relationship.James Stacey Taylor - 2004 - Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (3):383-391.
  7.  10
    Why Prohibiting Donor Compensation Can Prevent Plasma Donors From Giving Their Informed Consent to Donate.James Stacey Taylor - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (1):10-32.
    In recent years, there has been a considerable increase in the degree of philosophical attention devoted to the question of the morality of offering financial compensation in an attempt to increase the medical supply of human body parts and products, such as plasma. This paper will argue not only that donor compensation is ethically acceptable, but that plasma donors should not be prohibited from being offered compensation if they are to give their informed consent to donate. Regulatory regimes that prohibit (...)
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  8.  49
    How Not to Argue for Markets.James Stacey Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (2):165-179.
  9.  33
    The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death: New Essays.James Stacey Taylor (ed.) - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death brings together original essays that both address the fundamental questions of the metaphysics of death and explore the relationship between those questions and some of the areas of applied ethics in which they play a central role.
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  10.  38
    Vote Buying and Voter Preferences.James Stacey Taylor - 2017 - Social Theory and Practice 43 (1):107-124.
    A common criticism of plurality voting is that it fails to reflect the degree of intensity with which voters prefer the candidate or policy that they vote for. To rectify this, many critics of plurality voting have argued that vote buying should be allowed. Persons with more intense preferences for a candidate could buy votes from persons with less intense preferences for the opposing candidate and then cast them for the candidate that they intensely support. This paper argues that instead (...)
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  11.  31
    Moral Repugnance, Moral Distress, and Organ Sales.James Stacey Taylor - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):312-327.
    Many still oppose legalizing markets in human organs on the grounds that they are morally repugnant. I will argue in this paper that the repugnance felt by some persons towards sales of human organs is insufficient to justify their prohibition. Yet this rejection of the view that markets in human organs should be prohibited because some persons find them to be morally repugnant does not imply that persons’ feelings of distress at the possibility of organ sales are irrational. Eduardo Rivera-Lopez (...)
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  12.  81
    The Myth of Posthumous Harm.James Stacey Taylor - 2005 - American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):311 - 322.
  13.  47
    Autonomy, Duress, and Coercion.James Stacey Taylor - 2003 - Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):127-155.
    For the past three decades philosophical discussions of both personal autonomy and what it is for a person to “identify” with her desires have been dominated by the “hierarchical” analyses of these concepts developed by Gerald Dworkin and Harry Frankfurt. The longevity of these analyses is owed, in part, to the intuitive appeal of their shared claim that the concepts of autonomy and identification are to be analyzed in terms of hierarchies of desires, such that it is a necessary condition (...)
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  14.  99
    Privacy and Autonomy: A Reappraisal.James Stacey Taylor - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):587-604.
  15.  38
    Autonomy, Vote Buying, and Constraining Options.James Stacey Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (5):711-723.
    A common argument used to defend markets in ‘contested commodities’ is based on the value of personal autonomy. Autonomy is of great moral value; removing options from a person's choice set would compromise her ability to exercise her autonomy; hence, there should be a prima facie presumption against removing options from persons’ choice sets; thus, the burden of proof lies with those who wish to prohibit markets in certain goods. Christopher Freiman has developed a version of this argument to defend (...)
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  16.  12
    Social Autonomy and Family-Based Informed Consent.James Stacey Taylor - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):621-639.
    The Western focus on personal autonomy as the normative basis for securing persons’ consent to their treatment renders this autonomy-based approach to informed consent vulnerable to the charge that it is based on an overly atomistic understanding of the person. This leads to a puzzle: how does this generally-accepted atomistic understanding of the person fits with the emphasis on familial consent that occurs when family members are provided with the opportunity to veto a prospective donor’s wish to donate after she (...)
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  17.  10
    Semiotic Arguments and Markets in Votes.James Stacey Taylor - 2017 - Business Ethics Journal Review 5 (6):35-39.
    Jacob Sparks has developed a semiotic critique of markets that is based on the fact that “market exchanges express preferences.” He argues that some market transactions will reveal that the purchaser of a market good inappropriately prefers it to a similar non-market good. This avoids Brennan and Jaworski’s criticism that semiotic objections to markets fail as the meaning of market transactions are contingent social facts. I argue that Sparks’ argument is both incomplete and doomed to fail. It can only show (...)
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  18.  9
    From Directed Donation to Kidney Sale: Does the Argument Hold Up?James Stacey Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (5):597-614.
    The UCLA Medical Center has initiated a “voucher program” under which a person who donated a kidney would receive a voucher that she could provide to someone of her choosing who could then use it to move to the top of the renal transplantation waiting list. If the use of such vouchers as incentives for donors is morally permissible, then cash payments for kidneys are also morally permissible. But, that argument faces five objections. First, there are some goods whose nature (...)
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  19.  17
    What Limits Should Markets Be Without?James Stacey Taylor - 2016 - Business Ethics Journal Review 4 (7):41-46.
    In Markets Without Limits Brennan and Jaworski defend the view that there are “no legitimate worries about what we buy, trade, and sell.” But rather than being a unified defense of this position Brennan and Jaworski unwittingly offer three distinct pro-commodification views—two of which are subject to counterexamples. This Commentary will clarify what should be the thesis of their volume and identify the conditions that any counterexample to this must meet.
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  20.  71
    Autonomy, Constraining Options, and Organ Sales.James Stacey Taylor - 2002 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):273–285.
    We should try to alleviate it through allowing a current market in them continues to be morally condemned, usually on the grounds tha.
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  21.  60
    The Unjustified Assumptions of Organ Conscripters.James Stacey Taylor - 2009 - HEC Forum 21 (2):115-133.
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  22.  18
    Markets in Votes, Voter Liberty, and the Burden of Justification.James Stacey Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Research 42:325-340.
    Christopher Freiman, Jason Brennan, and Peter M. Jaworski have recently defended markets in votes. While their views differ in several respects they all believe that the primary justificatory burden lies not with those who defend markets in votes but with those who oppose them. Yet while the burden of proof should typically rest with those who wish to prohibit markets in certain goods this does not hold for the debate over markets in votes. Votes are crucially different from other goods (...)
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  23. Harming the Dead.James Stacey Taylor - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Research 33:185-202.
    It is widely accepted that a person can be harmed by events that occur after her death. The most influential account of how persons can suffer such posthumous harm has been provided by George Pitcher and Joel Feinberg. Yet, despite its influence (or perhaps because of it) the Feinberg-Pitcher account of posthumous harm has been subject to several well-known criticisms. Surprisingly, there has been no attempt to defend this account of posthumous harm against these criticisms, either by philosophers who work (...)
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  24. Why the 'Black Market' Arguments Against Legalizing Organ Sales Fail.James Stacey Taylor - 2006 - Res Publica 12 (2):163-178.
    One of the most widespread objections to legalizing a market in human organs is that such legalization would stimulate the black market in human organs. Unfortunately, the proponents of this argument fail to explain how such stimulation will occur. To remedy thus, two accounts of how legalizing markets in human organs could stimulate the black market in them are developed in this paper. Yet although these accounts remedy the lacuna in the anti-market argument from the black market neither of them (...)
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  25.  10
    Market-Based Reforms in Health Care Are Both Practical and Morally Sound.James Stacey Taylor - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):537-546.
    In this paper I argue that the free-market provision of health care is both practical and morally sound, and is superior in both respects to its provision by the State. The State provision of health care will be inefficient compared to its free-market alternative. It will thus provide less health care to persons for the same amount of expenditure, and so save fewer lives and alleviate less suffering for two reasons: state actors have no incentive to husband their resources effectively, (...)
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  26.  18
    Harming the Dead.James Stacey Taylor - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Research 33:185-202.
    It is widely accepted that a person can be harmed by events that occur after her death. The most influential account of how persons can suffer such posthumous harm has been provided by George Pitcher and Joel Feinberg. Yet, despite its influence the Feinberg-Pitcher account of posthumous harm has been subject to several well-known criticisms. Surprisingly, there has been no attempt to defend this account of posthumous harm against these criticisms, either by philosophers who work on the metaphysics of death (...)
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  27.  5
    Market-Based Reforms in Health Care Are Both Practical and Morally Sound.James Stacey Taylor - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):537-546.
    Markets have long had a whiff of sulphur about them. Plato condemned innkeepers, whose pursuit of profit he believed led them to take advantage of their customers, Aristotle believed that the pursuit of profit was indicative of moral debasement, and Cicero held that retailers are typically dishonest as this was the only path to gain. And even those who are more favorably disposed towards markets in general are frequently inclined to be suspicious of markets in medical goods and services. For (...)
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  28.  34
    A Scandal in Geneva.James Stacey Taylor - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):219-234.
    In 2013 the World Health Organization published a Report in which it was argued that countries should become self-sufficient in safe blood and blood products, and that these should be secured through voluntary non-remunerated donation. These two claims were putatively supported by a wealth of citations to peer-reviewed academic papers, the results of Royal Commissions and Public Inquiries in both Canada and the United Kingdom, and data collected from Non-Government Organizations. Yet not only do many of the sources cited by (...)
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  29.  14
    Autonomy and Informed Consent on the Navajo Reservation.James Stacey Taylor - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (4):506-516.
  30.  11
    Information for Contributors.Thomas Magnell, Moving Away From A. Local, Tibor R. Machan, Kevin Graham, Sharon Sytsma, Agape Sans Dieu, Jonathan Glover, Harry G. Frankfurt, James Stacey Taylor & Peter Singer - 2002 - Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (3):601-603.
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  31.  17
    Public Moralities and Markets in Organs.James Stacey Taylor - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):223-227.
    Schweda and Schicktanz argue that the debate over the ethics of using financial incentives to procure human transplant organs rests on socioempirical premises that need to be critically assessed. They contend that once this is achieved a completely new perspective on the debate should be adopted, with organ donation being viewed primarily as a reciprocal social interaction between donor and recipient. This paper challenges this conclusion, arguing that rather than supporting a new perspective on the debate over the commercial procurement (...)
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  32.  4
    Facing Death, Epicurus and His Critics.James Stacey Taylor - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):109-110.
  33.  11
    Organs: Tradable, but Not Necessarily Inheritable.James Stacey Taylor - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):62-62.
    Teck Chuan Voo and Soren Holm argue that “organs should be inheritable if they were to be socially and legally recognised as tradable property.”1 To support this view they first observe that “…legal recognition of objects as property… opens up the possibility of the legal recognition of the survival of the property rights and their inheritability after the death of the source/owner, even if those rights are intimately bound with the person.”1 They also note that if organs are tradable property (...)
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  34.  33
    The Value of Autonomy and the Right to Self-Medication.James Stacey Taylor - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):587-588.
    In ‘Three Arguments Against Prescription Requirements’, Jessica Flanigan argues that ‘prescription drug laws violate patients' rights to self-medication’ and that patients ‘have rights to self-medication for the same reasons they have rights to refuse medical treatment according to the doctrine of informed consent , claiming that the strongest of these reasons is grounded on the value of autonomy. However, close examination of the moral value of autonomy shows that rather than being the strongest justification for the DIC, respect for the (...)
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  35. Willing Addicts, Unweilling Additicts, and Acting of One's Own Free Will.James Stacey Taylor - 2005 - Philosophia 33 (1-4):237-262.
  36.  99
    In Praise of Big Brother: Why We Should Learn to Stop Worrying and Love Government Surveillance.James Stacey Taylor - 2005 - Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (3):227-246.
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  37. Autonomy Inducements and Organ Sales.James Stacey Taylor - 2005 - In Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.), Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  38.  61
    Personal Autonomy, Posthumous Harm, and Presumed Consent Policies for Organ Procurement.James Stacey Taylor - 2006 - Public Affairs Quarterly 20 (4):381-404.
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  39.  15
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]by Scott A. Anderson, Jeremy D. Bendik‐Keymer, Samuel Black, Chad M. Cyrenne, Bart Gruzalski, Mark P. Jenkins, John Morrow, Michael A. Neblo, Tommie Shelby & James Stacey Taylor - 2002 - Ethics 112 (2):421-427.
  40.  37
    Identification and Quasi-Desires.James Stacey Taylor - 2005 - Philosophical Papers 34 (1):111-136.
    Although the standard objections to Harry Frankfurt's early hierarchical analysis of identification and its variants are well known, more recent work on identification has yet to be subjected to the same degree of scrutiny. To remedy this I develop in this paper objections to Frankfurt's most recent analysis of identification as satisfaction that he first outlined in his paper ?The Faintest Passion?. With such objections in place I show that they demonstrate that Frankfurt's analysis fails because it is based on (...)
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  41.  13
    Autonomy and Political Liberalism.James Stacey Taylor - 2006 - Social Theory and Practice 32 (3):497-510.
  42.  16
    A Full-Blooded Defence Of Full-Blooded Epicureanism: Responses to My Critics.James Stacey Taylor - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):642-643.
    I cannot fully respond here to all of the subtle and sophisticated criticisms of my full-blooded Epicureanism that have been advanced by Frederik Kaufman, Stephan Blatti, TM Wilkinson and Walter Glannon.1–4 Accordingly, I will focus on correcting some misunderstandings of my position and on responding to some of the most pressing objections.Kaufman holds that the implications of my full-blooded Epicureanism are ‘startling,’ since if I am right “killing or being killed in war will be morally inconsequential, saving people from death (...)
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  43.  65
    Autonomy, Responsibility, and Women’s Obligation to Resist Sexual Harrassment.James Stacey Taylor - 2007 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):55-63.
    In a recent paper Carol Hay has argued for the conclusion that “a woman who has been sexually harassed has a moral obligation to confront her harasser.” I will argue in this paper that Hay’s arguments for her conclusion are unsound, for they rest on both a misconstrual of the nature of personal autonomy, and a misunderstanding of its relationship to moral responsibility. However, even though Hay’s own arguments do not support her conclusion that women have a duty to resist (...)
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  44.  9
    Autonomy, Responsibility, and Women’s Obligation to Resist Sexual Harrassment.James Stacey Taylor - 2007 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):55-63.
    In a recent paper Carol Hay has argued for the conclusion that “a woman who has been sexually harassed has a moral obligation to confront her harasser.” I will argue in this paper that Hay’s arguments for her conclusion are unsound, for they rest on both a misconstrual of the nature of personal autonomy, and a misunderstanding of its relationship to moral responsibility. However, even though Hay’s own arguments do not support her conclusion that women have a duty to resist (...)
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  45.  16
    A Review Of: “Thomas May. 2002. Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making”: Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. 135 Pp. $42.00, Hardcover. [REVIEW]James Stacey Taylor - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):92-93.
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  46.  15
    A Review Of:“Thomas May. 2002. Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making” Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. 135 Pp. $42.00, Hardcover. [REVIEW]James Stacey Taylor - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):92-93.
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  47.  29
    Annihilation: The Sense and Significance of Death – by Christopher Belshaw.James Stacey Taylor - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):218-219.
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  48.  41
    Buying and Selling Friendship.James Stacey Taylor - 2019 - American Philosophical Quarterly 56 (2):187-202.
    It is widely believed that the nature of love and friendship precludes them from being bought or sold. It will be argued in this paper that this view is false: There is no conceptual bar to the commodification of love and friendship. The arguments offered for this view will lead to another surprising conclusion: That these goods are asymmetrically alienable goods, goods whose nature is such that separate arguments must be provided for the views that they can be bought and (...)
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  49.  51
    Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death.James Stacey Taylor - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):534-536.
  50. Comments on Professor Elliot Cohen, “Philosophy With Teeth”.James Stacey Taylor - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Practice 2 (2):10-13.
    This paper comments on Cohen’s “Philosophy with Teeth”, and raises four questions surrounding the relationship between philosophy and psychology, most of which are requests for clarification from Cohen but two of which are more critical in character: Against Cohen’s claim that APPE disavows any intrinsic connection between philosophical counseling and psychology, it is suggested that this still leaves open the pos­sibility of an instrumental connection. And against Cohen’s claim that pure philosophy is “grist for the classroom” or for “stimulating discussions (...)
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