14 found
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  1.  61
    Performing for the Students: Teaching Identity and the Pedagogical Relationship.James Stillwaggon - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):67-83.
    Teacher identity is defined in its relations, on the one hand, to curriculum and, on the other, to students: to be identified as a teacher is to be taken by the latter as a bearer of the former. In this essay I consider some variations on theorising teacher identity within these relational terms. Beginning with the educational task of cultivating student subjects within the often impersonal aims of curriculum, I reject a correspondingly personalised production of teacher identity that would humanise (...)
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  2.  46
    Afterwords.James Stillwaggon, Charlotte Frye & Dennis Cato - 2005 - Educational Theory 55 (3):367-370.
  3.  15
    “A Fantasy of Untouchable Fullness”: Melancholia and Resistance to Educational Transformation.James Stillwaggon - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):51-66.
    The progressive language of growth and development that informs our shared ideal of the educated subject also informs the curricular structure of schooling, in which new learning builds upon established knowledge and students' development depends upon their desire to take on those identities associated with various achievements of knowledge. Each re-creation of the student's identity requires a new production of the student's former identity as an uneducated self — a negative statement of the self-overcome, fashioned in the language of the (...)
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  4.  13
    Annotations on a Scandal: Desire, Transgression, and the Filmic Fantasy of Pedagogy.James Stillwaggon & David Jelinek - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (5):529-544.
    From Socrates to Jean Brodie, we have become accustomed to teachers serving as placeholders for transgressive and powerful desires in our cultural imaginary. Evidenced by recent scholarship on teachers in film, however, as well as by the 2006 film Notes on a Scandal, the way we ought to feel about teachers acting on their transgressive motivations, realizing the cultural fantasies that shadow desire and break from social norms, is less clear. In this article James Stillwaggon and David Jelinek frame the (...)
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  5.  41
    Between Private and Public: Recognition, Revolution and Political Renewal.James Stillwaggon - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):351-364.
    This paper deals with some issues underlying the role of education in the preparation of students for democratic participation. Throughout, I maintain two basic ideas: first, that a political action undertaken to obtain practical ends reflects a set of privately held values whose recognition is therefore essential to any idea of the political; second, that the continued viability of liberal democracy is dependent upon its openness to alteration through its recognition of private values. In order to bring these ideas to (...)
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  6.  2
    Childhood Beyond Pathology: A Psychoanalytic Study of Development and Diagnosis.James Stillwaggon - 2020 - Educational Theory 70 (4):517-523.
  7. Filmed School: Desire, Transgression and the Filmic Fantasy of Pedagogy.James Stillwaggon & David Jelinek - 2016 - Routledge.
    __Filmed School__ examines the place that teaching holds in the public imaginary through its portrayal in cinema. From early films such as _Madchen in Uniform_ and _La Maternelle_ to contemporary images of teaching in _Notes on a Scandal_ and _History Boys_, teachers’ roles in film have been consistently contradictory, portraying teachers as both seducers and selfless heroes, social outcasts and moral models, contributing to a similarly divided popular understanding of teachers as both salvific and sinister. In this book, Stillwaggon and (...)
     
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  8. Gary Allan Scott and William A. Welton, Erotic Wisdom: Philosophy and Intermediacy in Plato's Symposium.James Stillwaggon - 2009 - Philosophy in Review 29 (5):375.
  9.  23
    Inviolable Laws, Impossible to Keep: Orwell on Education, Suffering, and the Loss of Childhood.James Stillwaggon - 2010 - Educational Theory 60 (1):61-80.
    Scholars from multiple disciplines have commented on the divided nature of childhood as a historical construction: a period of life to be valued in itself as well as a means to adulthood. In this essay, James Stillwaggon considers George Orwell's “Such, Such Were the Joys,” an autobiographical account of his childhood education, as a site of conflicting views on childhood. On analyzing Orwell's own conflicted memories, Stillwaggon describes education as a process of suffering the loss of childhood and inquires into (...)
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  10.  22
    Legal, Tender: The Deferred Romance of Pedagogical Relation in The Paper Chase.James Stillwaggon & David Jelinek - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (1):1-17.
    Films depicting educational relationships typically emphasize personal connections between students and teachers over the educational goals that such relations facilitate. In doing so, these films raise the question of how teachers stand in relation to their institutional roles in such a way as to inspire students’ desires for knowledge. In this paper, in order to examine the influence of institutional roles in defining teacher–student relationships, we analyze “The Paper Chase,” a film in which teacher and student have no personal connection (...)
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  11.  12
    On the Unmourned Losses of Educational Growth: An Introduction.James Stillwaggon - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):31-36.
  12.  14
    Two Functions of the Imagination in Greene's Aesthetic Educational Theory.James Stillwaggon - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):25.
    In Art as Experience, Dewey claims that “‘imagination’ shares with ‘beauty’ the doubtful honor of being the chief theme in esthetic writings of enthusiastic ignorance. More perhaps than any other phase of the human contribution, it has been treated as a special and self-contained faculty, differing from others in possession of mysterious potencies.”1 Despite this “doubtful honor,” or as some might claim, because of it, imagination seems to have become a matter of unquestionable value in educational rhetoric over the last (...)
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  13.  17
    ‘These Happen To Be My Own’: The Loss of Childhood Identity and the Idea of a Self.James Stillwaggon - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (8):1-12.
    Scholars of childhood and child-centered education draw attention to the multiple accounts of the child that have attended its brief history. In this article I read George Orwell’s ‘Such, such were the joys’ as a demonstration of the contradictions inherent in our notions of childhood, but also as a possible model for understanding how conflicted definitions of childhood contribute to the modern subject’s sense of identity. Following Orwell’s claim that he can hold two contradictory accounts of his childhood because ‘these (...)
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  14.  90
    The Problem of Propagation: Original Sin as Inherited Discourse.James Stillwaggon - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):61-73.
    As Modernist doctrines emphasizing the unity and agency of the educated self are increasingly set up as the straw men of contemporary educational discourses, premodern and Medieval theories of selfhood tend to disappear from the horizon of educational thought altogether. In this essay, in order to subvert this overcoming of our intellectual past, I examine Thomas Aquinas’ reading of the doctrine of original sin. Relying on Graham McAleer’s claim that Aquinas’ metaphysical theory sanctifies the body, I argue that Aquinas’ understanding (...)
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