14 found
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  1.  29
    Why Harry Brighouse is Nearly Right About the Privatisation of Education.James Tooley - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (3):427–447.
  2.  4
    The Prisoner's Dilemma and Educational Provision: A Reply to Ruth Jonathan.James Tooley - 1992 - British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (2):118-133.
  3.  29
    Equality of Educational Opportunity Without the State?James Tooley - 1993 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 12 (2-4):153-163.
  4.  13
    Markets or Democracy for Education? A Reply to Stewart Ranson.James Tooley - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (1):21-34.
    This paper, which offers a positive assessment of the role of markets in education, is a 'reply' to an earlier contribution to the Journal in which Stewart Ranson argues that markets are intrinsically flawed as a vehicle for improving educational opportunities. The 'reply', among other things, argues that Ranson fails to address the shortcomings of education under democratic control and ignores the educational benefits of authentic markets.
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  5.  22
    “The Role of Government in Education” Revisited: The Theory and Practice of Vouchers, with Pointers to Another Solution for American Education.James Tooley - 2014 - Social Philosophy and Policy 31 (1):204-228.
  6.  26
    Review Article.James Tooley & Robert D. Heslep - 1993 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 12 (2-4):257-265.
  7.  37
    From Adam Swift to Adam Smith: How the ‘Invisible Hand’ Overcomes Middle Class Hypocrisy.James Tooley - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):727–741.
    This paper challenges Richard Pring's suggestion that parents using private education may be undermining the desire for social justice and equality, using recent arguments of Adam Swift as a springboard. Swift's position on the banning of private schools, which uses a Rawlsian ‘veil of ignorance’ argument, is explored, and it is suggested that, if equality of opportunity is a major aim, it does not go far enough by permitting parental partiality. If the only alternative is a Platonic state, then this (...)
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  8.  7
    New Versus Old Barber: An Unfinished Revolution.James Tooley - 1999 - British Journal of Educational Studies 47 (1):28-42.
    Professor Michael Barber's The Learning Game is a key influence on education policy in England and Wales. This paper focuses on Barber's policy proposals and their theoretical foundations. The paper states the theoretical foundation of the proposals in chaos theory and the working assumption of this paper. It then explores Barber's proposals, for the curriculum, the teaching profession, and the 'individual learning promise'. Finally, alternative mechanisms for arriving at Barber's desired goals consistent with his theoretical framework are sketched out.
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  9.  7
    The ‘Pink‐Tank’ on the Education Reform Act.James Tooley - 1992 - British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (4):335-349.
  10.  6
    Politics, Markets and Schools Politics, Markets and America's Schools.James Tooley - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (2):257–264.
  11.  2
    Putting the Political Back Into Autonomy.James Tooley - 1995 - In Wendy Kohli (ed.), Critical Conversations in Philosophy of Education. Routledge. pp. 379.
  12.  2
    Saving Education From the 'Lurching Steam Roller'.James Tooley - 1997 - In David Bridges (ed.), Education, Autonomy, and Democratic Citizenship: Philosophy in a Changing World. Routledge. pp. 2--74.
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  13.  23
    The ‘Pink‐Tank’ on the Education Reform Act.James Tooley - 1992 - British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (4):335 - 349.
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  14.  20
    Markets or Democracy for Education? A Reply to Stewart Ranson.James Tooley - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (1):21-34.
    This paper, which offers a positive assessment of the role of markets in education, is a 'reply' to an earlier contribution to the Journal in which Stewart Ranson argues that markets are intrinsically flawed as a vehicle for improving educational opportunities. The 'reply', among other things, argues that Ranson fails to address the shortcomings of education under democratic control and ignores the educational benefits of authentic markets.
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