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  1. Hannah Arendt and the Languages of Global Governance.Jan Klabbers - 2012 - In Marco Goldoni & Christopher McCorkindale (eds.), Hannah Arendt and the Law. Hart Pub.2.
     
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  2. Normative Pluralism : An Exploration.Jan Klabbers & Touko Piiparinen - 2013 - In Jan Klabbers & Touko Piiparinen (eds.), Normative Pluralism and International Law: Exploring Global Governance. Cambridge University Press.
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    Normative Pluralism and International Law: Exploring Global Governance.Jan Klabbers & Touko Piiparinen (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses conflicts involving how law relates normative orders. The assumption behind the book is that law no longer automatically claims supremacy, but that actors can pick and choose which code to follow.
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    Off Limits? International Law and the Excessive Use of Force.Jan Klabbers - 2006 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 7 (1):59-80.
    This paper aims to explore whether there are any legal limits to the use of force, in particular when force is used for political reasons. How plausible is it to expect people to limit their options when they feel that what they’re doing paves the way towards paradise? In this light, much of the law of armed conflict would seem to be inadequate, based as much of it is on the premise that force is non-political. To the extent then that (...)
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  5. Peaceful Coexistence : Normative Pluralism in International Law.Jan Klabbers & Silke Trommer - 2013 - In Jan Klabbers & Touko Piiparinen (eds.), Normative Pluralism and International Law: Exploring Global Governance. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  6. The Challenge of Inter-Legality.Jan Klabbers & Gianluigi Palombella (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    The sovereignty of states to enact and enforce laws within their jurisdictions has been recognized since the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648. There are now, however, accepted global legal norms that transcend national sovereignty and hold states accountable for not including their domestic legal regimes. This volume is the first book-length treatment to describe and explain how legal orders can be interwoven, and what to do about it. Coining the term 'inter-legality', this volume provides essays on the history, primary areas (...)
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