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  1.  49
    Philosophical Sensitivity.Jana Mohr Lone - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):171-186.
    Although much has been written about the nature of philosophy and how the discipline can be defined, little attention has been paid to the ways we develop the facility to reflect philosophically or why cultivating this ability is valuable. This article develops a conception of “philosophical sensitivity,” a perceptual capacity that facilitates our awareness of the philosophical dimension of experience. Based in part on Aristotle's notion of a moral perceptual capacity, philosophical sensitivity starts with most people's natural inclinations as children (...)
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  2.  52
    Philosophy in High Schools: Guest Editors' Introduction to a Special Issue of Teaching Philosophy.Jana Mohr Lone & Mitchell Green - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):213-215.
  3.  34
    Methow Valley Elementary School Bill of Human Rights.Jana Mohr Lone - 2002 - Questions: Philosophy for Young People 2:5-5.
    Lone conducted weekly philosophical discussions for first and second graders on human rights and how to be treated in society. With “The right to be treated equally” as a nearly unanimous response, Lone records these reactions in a formatted list.
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  4.  21
    Discussion on Daniel Pinkwater’s I Am the Dog.Jana Mohr Lone - 2016 - Questions: Philosophy for Young People 16:3-3.
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  5.  38
    Recent Texts in Pre-College Philosophy.Jana Mohr Lone - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (1):51-67.
    This is an exciting time for people working in pre-college philosophy in the United States, as the last decade has seen slow but steady growth in the field. As the field develops, there is an expanding need for high-quality resources in a variety of areas: (1) for philosophers and other philosophy educators working with teachers, graduate and undergraduate students, and other adults to train skilled pre-college philosophy teachers; (2) for philosophy educators teaching philosophy in K–12 classrooms; and (3) for pre-college (...)
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  6.  15
    Introduction to the Symposium on Moral Philosophy with Children.Jana Mohr Lone - 2000 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):1-2.
  7.  7
    Introduction.Jana Mohr Lone - 2001 - Questions 1:1-1.
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  8.  5
    Introduction.Jana Mohr Lone - 2001 - Questions: Philosophy for Young People 1:1-1.
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  9. Questions And The Community Of Philosophical Inquiry.Jana Mohr Lone - 2011 - Childhood and Philosophy 7 (13):75-89.
    Matthew Lipman wrote that “questioning is the leading edge of inquiry.” This reflects the primacy of the question in a community of philosophical inquiry. The heart of the transformative potential of philosophy for children is student engagement in a dialogue grounded in the questions that most appeal to the group and the collaborative attempt to construct meaning and cultivate deep understanding. The students’ responsibility for choosing the question to begin their discussion enhances the democratic nature of the community and highlights (...)
     
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  10. Silence And Music: Questions About Aesthetics.Jana Mohr Lone - 2010 - Childhood and Philosophy 6 (11):127-136.
    This article describes a philosophy session with ten-year-old students centered around aesthetics, and in particular on questions about the meaning of music. The students explore the nature of music and art, including questions about what makes something music, artist intention, and the relation of art and the expression of emotion. The session involves a performance of John Cage’s work 4’ 33” and the way in which the performance can inspire a conversation with young people about philosophy of music. The article (...)
     
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