Results for 'Jane Garrison'

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  1.  4
    Brain Mechanisms of Reality Monitoring.Jon S. Simons, Jane R. Garrison & Marcia K. Johnson - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (6):462-473.
    Reality monitoring processes are necessary for discriminating between internally generated information and information that originated in the outside world. They help us to identify our thoughts, feelings, and imaginations, and to distinguish them from events we may have experienced or have been told about by someone else. Reality monitoring errors range from confusions between real and imagined experiences, that are byproducts of normal cognition, to symptoms of mental illness such as hallucinations. Recent advances support an emerging neurocognitive characterization of reality (...)
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  2. The Challenges of Meeting the Needs of Captive Elephants.Jane Garrison - 2008 - In Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.), Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 237.
     
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  3. Mary Jane; or, Spiritualism Chemically Explained [by - Guppy]. Guppy & Mary Jane - 1863
     
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  4.  43
    The “Permanent Deposit” of Hegelian Thought in Dewey’s Theory of Inquiry.Jim Garrison - 2006 - Educational Theory 56 (1):1-37.
    In this essay, Jim Garrison explores the emerging scholarship establishing a Hegelian continuity in John Dewey’s thought from his earliest publications to the work published in the last decade of his life. The primary goals of this study are, first, to introduce this new scholarship to philosophers of education and, second, to extend this analysis to new domains, including Dewey’s theory of inquiry, universals, and creative action. Ultimately, Garrison’s analysis also refutes the traditional account that claims that William (...)
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  5.  17
    Teacher as Prophetic Trickster.Jim Garrison - 2009 - Educational Theory 59 (1):67-83.
    There are a multitude of powerful cultural archetypes and images of the school teacher. These include nurturing caregiver, guardian of morality, champion of the global economy, self‐sacrificing do‐gooder, cultural worker, intellectual, tyrant, and many more metaphors. Jim Garrison’s essay introduces another figure, a mythological persona, to the pantheon of images depicting the school teacher — the Trickster. Tricksters are masters of multiple interpretation that cross, bend, break, and redefine borders. Garrison concentrates on prophetic tricksters that create openings in (...)
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  6.  19
    The Mark of the Cognitive: Reply to Elpidorou.Fred Adams & Rebecca Garrison - 2014 - Minds and Machines 24 (2):213-216.
    In a recent paper, Adams and Garrison offer an hypothesis about what constitutes the mark of the cognitive. In an even more recent paper, Elpidorou offers criticisms of our account. In this paper, we respond to Elpidourou’s criticisms and defend our account of the mark of the cognitive.
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  7. The Moon is Not There When I See It-a Response to Snyder.M. Garrison - 1990 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (2):225-232.
    In a series of articles, Snyder has developed the idea of simultaneous situations and that concept's implications for physics and psychology . In recent articles , he develops the application of the concept to the Einstein, Poldsky, and Rosen Gedankenexperiment that utilized spacelike separated events to solve the problem that arises in Bohr's complimentarity interpretation of quantum mechanics. In the course of his most recent article , Snyder made several criticisms of Garrison in order to strenghten Snyder's argument for (...)
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  8. Idealist and Realist Elements in Cantor's Approach to Set Theory.I. Jane - 2010 - Philosophia Mathematica 18 (2):193-226.
    There is an apparent tension between the open-ended aspect of the ordinal sequence and the assumption that the set-theoretical universe is fully determinate. This tension is already present in Cantor, who stressed the incompletable character of the transfinite number sequence in Grundlagen and avowed the definiteness of the totality of sets and numbers in subsequent philosophical publications and in correspondence. The tension is particularly discernible in his late distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities. I discuss Cantor’s contrasting views, and I (...)
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  9. What is Tarski's Common Concept of Consequence?Ignacio Jané - 2006 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):1-42.
    In 1936 Tarski sketched a rigorous definition of the concept of logical consequence which, he claimed, agreed quite well with common usage-or, as he also said, with the common concept of consequence. Commentators of Tarski's paper have usually been elusive as to what this common concept is. However, being clear on this issue is important to decide whether Tarski's definition failed (as Etchemendy has contended) or succeeded (as most commentators maintain). I argue that the common concept of consequence that Tarski (...)
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  10.  41
    John Dewey's Theory of Practical Reasoning.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (3):291–312.
  11.  50
    Foucault, Dewey, and Self‐Creation.Jim Garrison - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (2):111–134.
  12. The Role of the Absolute Infinite in Cantor's Conception of Set.Ignacio Jané - 1995 - Erkenntnis 42 (3):375 - 402.
  13.  62
    Dewey's Philosophy and the Experience of Working: Labor, Tools and Language.Jim Garrison - 1995 - Synthese 105 (1):87 - 114.
    Although Richard Rorty has done much to renew interest in the philosophy of John Dewey, he nonetheless rejects two of the most important components of Dewey's philosophy, that is, his metaphysics and epistemology. Following George Santayana, Rorty accuses Dewey of trying to serve Locke and Hegel, an impossibility as Rorty rightly sees it. Rorty (1982) says that Dewey should have been Hegelian all the way (p. 85). By reconstructing a bit of Hegel's early philosophy of work, and comparing it to (...)
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  14. Well- and Non-Well-Founded Fregean Extensions.Ignacio Jané & Gabriel Uzquiano - 2004 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (5):437-465.
    George Boolos has described an interpretation of a fragment of ZFC in a consistent second-order theory whose only axiom is a modification of Frege's inconsistent Axiom V. We build on Boolos's interpretation and study the models of a variety of such theories obtained by amending Axiom V in the spirit of a limitation of size principle. After providing a complete structural description of all well-founded models, we turn to the non-well-founded ones. We show how to build models in which foundation (...)
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  15.  50
    Dewey, Derrida, and 'the Double Bind'.Jim Garrison - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (3):349–362.
  16.  19
    Philosophy as Education.Jim Garrison - 2006 - In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), Educational Theory. Blackwell. pp. 391-406.
  17.  14
    Reporting on Private Affairs of Candidates: A Study of Newspaper Practices.Bruce Garrison & Sigman Splichal - 1994 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (3):169 – 183.
    Public debates rage on about the extent to which the character of political candidates should be examined in the public media. This study examines attitudes of newspaper editors, and finds that their attitudes appear to approximate those of the public. A substantial number of editors felt that too much public attention is paid to these matters, yet there was a recognition of demand. As in office gossip, people want to hear these things, but the teller loses some credibility.
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  18. Food From Thought.James W. Garrison & Bruce W. Watson - 2005 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):242-256.
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  19. Reflections on Skolem's Relativity of Set-Theoretical Concepts.Ignagio Jane - 2001 - Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):129-153.
    In this paper an attempt is made to present Skolem's argument, for the relativity of some set-theoretical notions as a sensible one. Skolem's critique of set theory is seen as part of a larger argument to the effect that no conclusive evidence has been given for the existence of uncountable sets. Some replies to Skolem are discussed and are shown not to affect Skolem's position, since they all presuppose the existence of uncountable sets. The paper ends with an assessment of (...)
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  20.  70
    Hintikka, Laudan and Newton: An Interrogative Model of Scientific Inquiry.James W. Garrison - 1988 - Synthese 74 (2):145 - 171.
  21.  35
    Dangerous Dualisms in Siegel’s Theory of Critical Thinking: A Deweyan Pragmatist Responds.Jim Garrison - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (2):213–232.
  22.  83
    Husserl, Galileo, and the Processes of Idealization.James W. Garrison - 1986 - Synthese 66 (2):329 - 338.
    This essay is concerned with the processes of idealization as described by Husserl in his last work, "The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology". Central as the processes of idealization are to Husserl's reflections on the origin of natural scientific knowledge and his attempt to reground that knowledge in the "forgotten meaning-fundament of natural science," they have not always been well understood. One reason for this is the lack of concrete historical examples. The main purpose of this paper is (...)
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  23.  81
    The Paradox of Indoctrination: A Solution.James W. Garrison - 1986 - Synthese 68 (2):261 - 273.
  24.  18
    Dewey's Constructivism : From the Reflex Arc Concept to Social Constructivism.Jim Garrison - 2009 - In Larry A. Hickman, Stefan Neubert & Kersten Reich (eds.), John Dewey Between Pragmatism and Constructivism. Fordham University Press.
    This chapter presents a constructivist reading of Dewey's work by establishing a line of development between Dewey's 1896 essay on the reflex arc and the social constructivism explicit in his later works. It demonstrates the relevance of classical Pragmatism to current issues in the philosophy of education, highlighting key theoretical and conceptual components of the cultural construction of meanings, truth claims, and identities. It also looks into Dewey's short essay “Knowledge and Speech Reaction” to identify the connection between speech acts, (...)
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  25.  67
    Lógica Y Ontología.Ignacio Jané - 1988 - Theoria 4 (1):81-106.
    In this paper we discuss the way logical consequence depends on what sets there are. We try to find out what set-theoretical assumptions have to be made to determine a logic, i.e., to give a definite answer to whether any given argument is correct. Consideration of second order logic -which is left highly indetermined by the usual set-theoretical axioms- prompts us to suggest a slightly different but natural nation of logical consequence, which reduces second order logic indeterminacy without interfering with (...)
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  26.  88
    Review of C. Badesa, The Birth of Model Theory: Löwenheim's Theorem in the Frame of the Theory of Relatives[REVIEW]Ignacio Jané - 2005 - Philosophia Mathematica 13 (1):91-106.
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  27.  26
    Summing Up Our Differences: A Reply to Siegel.Jim Garrison - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):229–232.
  28.  47
    Being a Whole Person.Jim Garrison & S. B. Schneider - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (7):766–769.
  29.  17
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]K. Jane - 1994 - British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (2).
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  30.  4
    After Cologne : An Online Email Discussion About the Philosophy of John Dewey.Larry A. Hickman, Stefan Neubert, Kersten Reich, Kenneth W. Stikkers & Jim Garrison - 2009 - In Larry A. Hickman, Stefan Neubert & Kersten Reich (eds.), John Dewey Between Pragmatism and Constructivism. Fordham University Press.
    This chapter presents an edited e-mail discussion based on the philosophical conversations at a conference held in Cologne, Germany, in December 2001. The discussion proceeds in three steps. First, the contributors discuss selected questions about their contributions, roughly following the sequence of the chapters in Part II of this book. Second, the contributors ask more general questions about Dewey, Pragmatism, and constructivism. Finally, the chapter ends with brief statements about why Dewey is still an indispensible thinker for them. As they (...)
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  31.  7
    Three Manuscripts for Lucchese Canons of S. Frediano in Rome.Edward B. Garrison - 1975 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 38:1-52.
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  32. Innovation for Transportation.William L. Garrison - 1981 - In Torsten Hägerstrand & Allan Pred (eds.), Space and Time in Geography: Essays Dedicated to Torsten Hägerstrand. Cwk Gleerup.
     
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  33. Invitation to Philosophy.Winfred Ernest Garrison - 1970 - Houston, Tex.University of Houston.
     
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  34. Tantra: The Yoga of Sex.Omar V. Garrison - 1972 - London: Academy Editions.
     
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  35. A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot.Charles R. Pigden - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds that ABSENT (...)
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  36. Jane Addams's Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist-Feminist Communitarianism.Judy D. Whipps - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):118-133.
    This paper argues that communitarian philosophy can be an important philosophic resource for feminist thinkers, particularly when considered in the light of Jane Addams's (1860-1935) feminist-pragmatism. Addams's communitarianism requires progressive change as well as a moral duty to seek out diverse voices. Contrary to some contemporary communitarians, Addams extends her concept of community to include interdependent global communities, such as the global community of women peace workers.
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  37.  24
    Jane Addams.Maurice Hamington - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This comprehensive encyclopedia entry discusses the life and works of Jane Addams (1860-1935) who influenced contemporaries John Dewey, William James, and George Herbert Mead. Although not traditionally categorized as a philosopher, Addams was a prolific writer who developed a social philosophy of attentiveness and sympathetic knowledge that prefigures contemporary feminist care ethics.
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  38.  29
    Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling.James Lindemann Nelson - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on (...)
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  39.  37
    Jane Addams as Experimental Philosopher.Joshua August Skorburg - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):918-938.
    This paper argues that the activist, feminist and pragmatist Jane Addams was an experimental philosopher. To defend this claim, I argue for capacious notions of both philosophical pragmatism and experimental philosophy. I begin in Section 2 with a new defence of Rose and Danks’ [‘In Defense of a Broad Conception of Experimental Philosophy’. Metaphilosophy 44, no. 4 : 512–32] argument in favour of a broad conception of experimental philosophy. Koopman [‘Pragmatist Resources for Experimental Philosophy: Inquiry in Place of Intuition’. (...)
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  40. Jane Addams on Education.Jane Addams & Ellen Condliffe Lagemann - 1985
  41.  38
    A Journey to Madness: Jane Bowles's Narrative and Schizophrenia. [REVIEW]Inmaculada Cobos Fernández - 2001 - Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (4):265-283.
    This work is a study of Jane Bowles's madness as revealed through several of her literary works and her life story. On a parallel plane, it is an epistemological exploration of the points of intersection between humanistic psychoanalysis and deconstructive literary criticism. Here we consider the schizoid traits in Two Serious Ladies (1943) and in “Camp Cataract” (1949), using the theories developed in this area by the psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1927–1989).
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  42.  34
    Embodied Care: Jane Addams, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Feminist Ethics.Maurice Hamington - 2004 - University of Illinois Press.
    Embodied Care is the first work to argue for the body's centrality to care ethics, doing so by analyzing our corporeality at the phenomenological level.
  43.  51
    Theorizing Jane Crow, Theorizing Unknowability.Kristie Dotson - 2017 - Social Epistemology 31 (5):417-430.
    In this essay, I offer an epistemological accounting of Pauli Murray’s idea of Jane Crow dynamics. Jane Crow, in my estimation, refers to clashing supremacy systems that provide targets for subordination while removing grounds to demand recourse for said subordination. As a description of an oppressive state, it is an idea of subordination with an epistemological engine. Here, I offer an epistemological reading of Jane Crow dynamics by theorizing three imbricated conditions for Jane Crow, i.e. the (...)
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  44. On Jane Forsey’s Critique of the Sublime.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2017 - In Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.), The Possibility of the Sublime: Aesthetic Exchanges. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 81-91.
    The sublime is an aspect of experience that has attracted a great deal of scholarship, not only for scholarly reasons but because it connotes aspects of experience not exhausted by what Descartes once called clear distinct perception. That is, the sublime is an experience of the world which involves us in orientating ourselves within it, and this orientation, our human orientation, elevates us in comparison to the non-human world according to traditional accounts of the sublime. The sublime tells us something (...)
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  45. Reasoning About the Mark of the Cognitive: A Response to Adams and Garrison[REVIEW]Andreas Elpidorou - 2013 - Minds and Machines (2):1-11.
    I critically examine Adams and Garrison’s proposed necessary condition for the mark of the cognitive (Adams and Garrison in Minds Mach 23(3):339–352, 2013). After a brief presentation of their position, I argue not only that their proposal is in need of additional support, but also that it is too restrictive.
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  46.  18
    Understanding Other Minds From the Inside: Jane Heal.Jane Heal - 1998 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:83-99.
    Can we understand other minds ‘from the inside’? What would this mean? There is an attraction which many have felt in the idea that creatures with minds, people , invite a kind of understanding which inanimate objects such as rocks, plants and machines, do not invite and that it is appropriate to seek to understand them ‘from the inside’. What I hope to do in this paper is to introduce and defend one version of the so-called ‘simulation’ approach to our (...)
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  47. Ultimacy and Sweet Jane.Michael McKenna - unknown
    Some people, they like to go out dancing And other peoples, they have to work And there’s even some evil mothers Well they’re gonna tell you that everything is just dirt You know, that women, never really faint And that villains always blink their eyes And that, children are the only ones who really blush And that, life is just to die. And, everyone who had a heart, They wouldn’t turn around and break it And that everyone who played a (...)
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  48.  14
    Externalism and Memory: Jane Heal.Jane Heal - 1998 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 72 (1):95-110.
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  49.  75
    Socializing Democracy: Jane Addams and John Dewey.Charlene Haddock Seigfried - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (2):207-230.
    The author argues that the contributions of Jane Addams and the women of theHull House Settlement to pragmatist theory, particularly as formulated by JohnDewey, are largely responsible for its emancipatory emphasis. By recoveringAddams's own pragmatist theory, a version of pragmatist feminism is developedthat speaks to such contemporary feminist issues as the manner of inclusionin society of diverse persons, marginalized by gender, ethnicity, race, andsexual orientation; the strengths and limitations of standpoint theory; and theneed for feminist ethics to embrace the (...)
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  50.  17
    II–Jane Heal.Jane Heal - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):95-109.
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