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  1.  8
    Gluing Life Together. Computer Simulation in the Life Sciences: An Introduction.Janina Wellmann - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (4):70.
    Over the course of the last three decades, computer simulations have become a major tool of doing science and engaging with the world, not least in an effort to predict and intervene in a future to come. Born in the context of the Second World War and the discipline of physics, simulations have long spread into most diverse fields of enquiry and technological application. This paper introduces a topical collection focussing on simulations in the life sciences. Echoing the current state (...)
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  2.  7
    Animating Embryos: The in Toto Representation of Life.Janina Wellmann - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Science 50 (3):521-535.
    With the recent advent of systems biology, developmental biology is taking a new turn. Attempts to create a ‘digital embryo’ are prominent among systems approaches. At the heart of these systems-based endeavours, variously described as ‘in vivoimaging’, ‘live imaging’ or ‘in totorepresentation’, are visualization techniques that allow researchers to image whole, live embryos at cellular resolution over time. Ultimately, the aim of the visualizations is to build a computer model of embryogenesis. This article examines the role of such visualization techniques (...)
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  3.  7
    Model and movement: studying cell movement in early morphogenesis, 1900 to the present.Janina Wellmann - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):59.
    Morphogenesis is one of the fundamental processes of developing life. Gastrulation, especially, marks a period of major translocations and bustling rearrangements of cells that give rise to the three germ layers. It was also one of the earliest fields in biology where cell movement and behaviour in living specimens were investigated. This article examines scientific attempts to understand gastrulation from the point of view of cells in motion. It argues that the study of morphogenesis in the twentieth century faced a (...)
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  4.  14
    Science and Cinema.Janina Wellmann - 2011 - Science in Context 24 (3):311-328.
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  5.  1
    Computer Simulations Then and Now: An Introduction and Historical Reassessment.Arianna Borrelli & Janina Wellmann - 2019 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 27 (4):407-417.
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    Tobias Cheung,Organismen. Agenten zwischen Innen- und Außenwelten, Bielefeld: transcript 2014.Janina Wellmann - 2015 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 38 (2):190-192.
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    Die Metamorphose der Bilder.Janina Wellmann - 2008 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 16 (2):183-211.
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  8.  7
    Folding Into Being: Early Embryology and the Epistemology of Rhythm.Janina Wellmann - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 37 (1):17-33.
    Historians have often described embryology and concepts of development in the period around 1800 in terms of “temporalization” or “dynamization”. This paper, in contrast, argues that a central epistemological category in the period was “rhythm”, which played a major role in the establishment of the emerging discipline of biology. I show that Caspar Friedrich Wolff’s epigenetic theory of development was based on a rhythmical notion, namely the hypothesis that organic development occurs as a series of ordered rhythmical repetitions and variations. (...)
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