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Jason Adam Wasserman
Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
  1.  22
    When Respecting Autonomy Is Harmful: A Clinically Useful Approach to the Nocebo Effect.Daniel Londyn Menkes, Jason Adam Wasserman & John T. Fortunato - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (6):36-42.
    Nocebo effects occur when an adverse effect on the patient arises from the patient's own negative expectations. In accordance with informed consent, providers often disclose information that results in unintended adverse outcomes for the patient. While this may adhere to the principle of autonomy, it violates the doctrine of “primum non nocere,” given that side-effect disclosure may cause those side effects. In this article we build off previous work, particularly by Wells and Kaptchuk and by Cohen :3–11.[Taylor & Francis Online], (...)
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  2.  8
    Capacity for Preferences: Respecting Patients with Compromised Decision‐Making.Jason Adam Wasserman & Mark Christopher Navin - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):31-39.
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  3.  20
    Reasons to Amplify the Role of Parental Permission in Pediatric Treatment.Mark Christopher Navin & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (11):6-14.
    Two new documents from the Committee on Bioethics of the American Academy of Pediatrics expand the terrain for parental decision making, suggesting that pediatricians may override only those parental requests that cross a harm threshold. These new documents introduce a broader set of considerations in favor of parental authority in pediatric care than previous AAP documents have embraced. While we find this to be a positive move, we argue that the 2016 AAP positions actually understate the importance of informed and (...)
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  4.  10
    The Irrelevance of Origins: Dementia, Advance Directives, and the Capacity for Preferences.Jason Adam Wasserman & Mark Christopher Navin - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):98-100.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 98-100.
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  5.  34
    Experimental Evidence Showing That Physician Guidance Promotes Perceptions of Physician Empathy.Daniel Russell Hans, Priyanka Dubé & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):135-139.
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  6.  14
    Capacity for Preferences and Pediatric Assent: Implications for Pediatric Practice.Mark Christopher Navin & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (1):43-51.
  7.  5
    When Do Pediatricians Call the Ethics Consultation Service? Impact of Clinical Experience and Formal Ethics Training.Mark C. Navin, Jason Adam Wasserman, Susanna Jain, Katie R. Baughman & Naomi T. Laventhal - 2020 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 11 (2):83-90.
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  8.  15
    Harm and Parental Permission: A Response to Our Critics.Mark Christopher Navin & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (11):W1-W4.
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  9.  14
    On Art and Science: An Epistemic Framework for Integrating Social Science and Clinical Medicine.Jason Adam Wasserman - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (3):279-303.
    Calls for incorporating social science into patient care typically have accounted for neither the logistic constraints of medical training nor the methodological fallacies of utilizing aggregate “social facts” in clinical practice. By elucidating the different epistemic approaches of artistic and scientific practices, this paper illustrates an integrative artistic pedagogy that allows clinical practitioners to generate social scientific insights from actual patient encounters. Although there is no shortage of calls to bring social science into medicine, the more fundamental processes of thinking (...)
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  10.  5
    Nonmaleficence, Nondisclosure, and Nocebo: Response to Open Peer Commentaries.John T. Fortunato, Jason Adam Wasserman & Daniel Londyn Menkes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):4-5.
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  11.  10
    Placebo Analgesia as Nocebo Reduction.John T. Fortunato, Jason Adam Wasserman & Daniel Londyn Menkes - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (3):198-199.
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  12.  21
    Reasons to Accept Vaccine Refusers in Primary Care.Mark Christopher Navin, Jason Adam Wasserman & Douglas Opel - 2020 - Pediatrics 6 (146):e20201801.
    Vaccine refusal forces us to confront tensions between many values, including scientific expertise, parental rights, children’s best interests, social responsibility, public trust, and community health. Recent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable and emerging infectious diseases have amplified these issues. The prospect of a coronavirus disease 2019 vaccine signals even more friction on the horizon. In this contentious sociopolitical landscape, it is therefore more important than ever for clinicians to identify ethically justified responses to vaccine refusal.
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  13.  3
    The Capacity to Designate a Surrogate is Distinct From Decisional Capacity: Normative and Empirical Considerations.Mark Navin, Jason Adam Wasserman, Devan Stahl & Tom Tomlinson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-107078.
    The capacity to designate a surrogate is not simply another kind of medical decision-making capacity. A patient with DMC can express a preference, understand information relevant to that choice, appreciate the significance of that information for their clinical condition, and reason about their choice in light of their goals and values. In contrast, a patient can possess the CDS even if they cannot appreciate their condition or reason about the relative risks and benefits of their options. Patients who lack DMC (...)
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  14.  8
    Making Sense of Everett’s Arrival: A Commentary on the Power of Birth Narratives.Jason Adam Wasserman & Rendy Nicole Wasserman - 2017 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 7 (3):225-230.
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  15.  19
    Problematics of Grounded Theory: Innovations for Developing an Increasingly Rigorous Qualitative Method.Jason Adam Wasserman, Jeffrey Michael Clair & Kenneth L. Wilson - 2009 - Qualitative Research 9 (3):355-381.
    Our purpose in this article is to identify and suggest resolution for two core problematics of grounded theory. First, while grounded theory provides transparency to one part of the conceptualization process, where codes emerge directly from the data, it provides no such systematic or transparent way for gaining insight into the conceptual relationships between discovered codes. Producing a grounded theory depends not only on the definition of conceptual pieces, but the delineation of a relationship between at least two of those (...)
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  16.  3
    Practising What We Preach: Clinical Ethicists’ Professional Perspectives and Personal Use of Advance Directives.Jason Adam Wasserman, Mark Christopher Navin, Victoria Drzyzga & Tyler S. Gibb - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106760.
    The field of clinical bioethics strongly advocates for the use of advance directives to promote patient autonomy, particularly at the end of life. This paper reports a study of clinical bioethicists’ perceptions of the professional consensus about advance directives, as well as their personal advance care planning practices. We find that clinical bioethicists are often sceptical about the value of advance directives, and their personal choices about advance directives often deviate from what clinical ethicists acknowledge to be their profession’s recommendations. (...)
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