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Jason T. Eberl [116]Jason Thomas Eberl [1]
  1.  51
    Protecting reasonable conscientious refusals in health care.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):565-581.
    Recently, debate over whether health care providers should have a protected right to conscientiously refuse to offer legal health care services—such as abortion, elective sterilization, aid in dying, or treatments for transgender patients—has grown exponentially. I advance a modified compromise view that bases respect for claims of conscientious refusal to provide specific health care services on a publicly defensible rationale. This view requires health care providers who refuse such services to disclose their availability by other providers, as well as to (...)
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  2. Thomistic Principles and Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2006 - New York: Routledge.
    Alongside a revival of interest in Thomism in philosophy, scholars have realised its relevance when addressing certain contemporary issues in bioethics. This book offers a rigorous interpretation of Aquinas's metaphysics and ethical thought, and highlights its significance to questions in bioethics. Jason T. Eberl applies Aquinas’s views on the seminal topics of human nature and morality to key questions in bioethics at the margins of human life – questions which are currently contested in the academia, politics and the media such (...)
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  3.  31
    Dead Enough? NRP-cDCD and Remaining Questions for the Ethics of DCD Protocols.Patrick McCruden, Jason T. Eberl, Erica K. Salter & Kyle Karches - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (2):41-43.
    In their article, Nielsen Busch and Mjaaland defend the moral permissibility of cDCD, suggesting that much of the controversy around this donation practice has been the result of a misinterpretatio...
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  4.  18
    The nature of human persons: metaphysics and bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2020 - Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.
    The questions of whether there is a shared nature common to all human beings and, if so, what essential qualities define this nature are among the most widely discussed topics in the history of philosophy and remain the subject of perennial interest and controversy. This book offers a metaphysical investigation of the composition of the human essence-that is, with what is a human being identical or what types of parts are necessary for a human being to exist: an immaterial mind, (...)
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  5.  32
    Disability, Enhancement, and Flourishing.Jason T. Eberl - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (5):597-611.
    Recent debate among bioethicists concerns the potential to enhance human beings’ physical or cognitive capacities by means of genetic, pharmacological, cybernetic, or surgical interventions. Between “transhumanists,” who argue for unreserved enhancement of human capabilities, and “bioconservatives,” who warn against any non-therapeutic manipulation of humanity’s natural condition, lie those who support limited forms of enhancement for the sake of individual and collective human flourishing. Many scholars representing these views also share a concern over the status and interests of human beings with (...)
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  6.  45
    Enhancing the Imago Dei: Can a Christian Be a Transhumanist?Jason T. Eberl - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (1):76-93.
    Transhumanism is an ideology that embraces the use of various forms of biotechnology to enhance human beings toward the emergence of a “posthuman” kind. In this article, I contrast some of the foundational tenets of Transhumanism with those of Christianity, primarily focusing on their respective anthropologies—that is, their diverse understandings of whether there is an essential nature shared by all human persons and, if so, whether certain features of human nature may be intentionally altered in ways that contribute toward how (...)
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  7.  42
    Can Prudence Be Enhanced?Jason T. Eberl - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (5):506-526.
    Some bioethicists have argued that moral bioenhancement, complementing traditional means of enhancing individuals’ moral dispositions, is essential if we are to survive as a species. Traditional means of moral enhancement have historically included civil legislation, socially recognized moral exemplars, religious teachings and disciplines, and familial upbringing. I explore the necessity and feasibility of pursuing methods of moral bioenhancement as a complement to such traditional means, grounding my analysis within a virtue-theoretic framework. Specifically, I focus on the essential intellectual virtue for (...)
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  8. Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care.Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed to enshrine (...)
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  9.  18
    What Makes Conscientious Refusals Concerning Abortion Different.Jason T. Eberl - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):62-64.
    Fritz argues that there is an “unjustified asymmetry” in legislation that allows physicians and health care institutions to refuse to provide elective abortions and other morally contested l...
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  10.  23
    Conscience, Compromise, and Complicity.Jason T. Eberl & Christopher Ostertag - 2018 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 92:161-174.
    Debate over whether health care institutions or individual providers should have a legally protected right to conscientiously refuse to offer legal services to patients who request them has grown exponentially due to the increasing legalization of morally contested services. This debate is particularly acute for Catholic health care providers. We elucidate Catholic teaching regarding the nature of conscience and the intrinsic value of being free to act in accord with one’s conscience. We then outline the primary positions defended in this (...)
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  11. Do human persons persist between death and resurrection?Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - In Kevin Timpe (ed.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. New York: Routledge.
    Thomas Aquinas presents an account of human immortality and bodily resurrection intended to be both faithful to Christian Scripture and metaphysically sound as following from the Aristotelian view of human nature. One central question is whether a human person persists between death and resurrection by virtue of her soul, given Aquinas’s hylomorphic account of human nature and assertion that a human person is not identical to her soul. Robert Pasnau contends that only a part of a person exists between death (...)
     
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  12.  95
    A Thomistic appraisal of human enhancement technologies.Jason T. Eberl - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (4):289-310.
    Debate concerning human enhancement often revolves around the question of whether there is a common “nature” that all human beings share and which is unwarrantedly violated by enhancing one’s capabilities beyond the “species-typical” norm. I explicate Thomas Aquinas’s influential theory of human nature, noting certain key traits commonly shared among human beings that define each as a “person” who possesses inviolable moral status. Understanding the specific qualities that define the nature of human persons, which includes self-conscious awareness, capacity for intellective (...)
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  13.  17
    Purely Faith-Based vs. Rationally-Informed Theological Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (12):14-16.
    Commentary on re-opening dialogue between theological and secular voices in bioethics.
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  14.  26
    When First We Practice to Deceive.Jason T. Eberl & Erica K. Salter - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (5):15-17.
    We argue against Christopher Meyers’s call for clinical ethicists to participate in deceiving patients, surrogate decision-makers, or family members. While we acknowledge that some forms of deception may be ethically appropriate in highly circumscribed situations, the type of case Meyers describes as involving justifiable deception differs in at least two important ways. First, Meyers fails to distinguish acts of deception based on the critical feature of who is being deceived—patient, surrogate, or family member—and the overarching duty to respect the autonomy (...)
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  15.  47
    Contemporary Controversies in Catholic Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl (ed.) - 2017 - Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
    This volume comprises various viewpoints representing a Catholic perspective on contemporary practices in medicine and biomedical research. The Roman Catholic Church has had a significant impact upon the formulation and application of moral values and principles to a wide range of controversial issues in bioethics. Catholic leaders, theologians, and bioethicists have elucidated and marshaled arguments to support the Church’s definitive positions on several bioethical issues, such as abortion, euthanasia, and reproductive cloning. Not all bioethical issues, however, have been definitively addressed (...)
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  16.  61
    The beginning of personhood: A thomistic biological analysis.Jason T. Eberl - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (2):134–157.
    ‘When did I, a human person, begin to exist?’ In developing an answer to this question, I utilize a Thomistic framework, which holds that the human person is a composite of a biological organism and an intellective soul. Eric Olson and Norman Ford both argue that the beginning of an individual human biological organism occurs at the moment when implantation of the zygote in the uterus occurs and the ‘primitive streak’ begins to form. Prior to this point, there does not (...)
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  17.  33
    Losing One’s Head or Gaining a New Body?Jason T. Eberl - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):189-209.
    A surgical head-transplant technique, HEAVEN, promises to offer significantly improved quality of life for quadriplegics and others whose minds are functional, but whose bodies require artificial support to continue living. HEAVEN putatively actualizes a thought-experiment long debated by philosophers concerning the definition of personhood and criterion of personal identity through time and change. HEAVEN’s advocates presume to preserve the identity of the person whose head is transplanted onto another’s living body, leaving one’s previous body behind as one would their corpse. (...)
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  18.  72
    Aquinas on the Nature of Human Beings.Jason T. Eberl - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):333-365.
    IN THIS PAPER, I PROVIDE A FORMULATION of Thomas Aquinas’s account of the nature of human beings for the purpose of comparing it with other accounts in both the history of philosophy and contemporary analytic philosophy. I discuss how his apparently dualistic understanding of the relationship between soul and body yields the conclusion that a human being exists as a unified substance composed of a rational soul informing, that is, serving as the specific organizing principle of, a physical body. I (...)
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  19.  24
    Is COVID-19 Vaccination Ordinary (Morally Obligatory) Treatment?James McTavish & Jason T. Eberl - 2022 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 22 (2):319-333.
    Many Catholics have expressed hesitancy or resistance to being vaccinated for COVID-19, with magisterial authorities and influential Catholic organizations advocating divergent views regarding the moral liceity of the vaccines, the justification of vaccination mandates, and whether such mandates should include religious exemptions. We address each of these disputed points and argue that vaccination for COVID-19 falls within the definition of being an ordinary—and thereby morally obligatory—treatment. To that end, we offer a brief overview of the Catholic moral tradition regarding the (...)
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  20.  66
    A Thomistic understanding of human death.Jason T. Eberl - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (1):29–48.
    I investigate Thomas Aquinas's metaphysical account of human death, which is defined in terms of a rational soul separating from its material body. The question at hand concerns what criterion best determines when this separation occurs. Aquinas argues that a body has a rational soul only insofar as it is properly organised to support the soul's vegetative, sensitive, and rational capacities. According to the ‘higher‐brain’ concept of death, when a body can no longer provide the biological foundation necessary for the (...)
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  21.  21
    The many metaphysical commitments of secular clinical ethics: Expanding the argument for a moral–metaphysical proceduralism.Abram Brummett & Jason T. Eberl - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (7):783-793.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 7, Page 783-793, September 2022.
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  22.  39
    I Am My Brother’s Keeper: Communitarian Obligations to the Dying Person.Jason T. Eberl - 2018 - Christian Bioethics 24 (1):38-58.
    Contemporary arguments concerning the permissibility of physician-assisted suicide [PAS], or suicide in general, often rehearse classical arguments over whether individual persons have a fundamental right based on autonomy to determine their own death, or whether the community has a legitimate interest in individual members’ welfare that would prohibit suicide. I explicate historical arguments pertaining to PAS aligned with these poles. I contend that an ethical indictment of PAS entails moral duties on the part of one’s community to provide effective means (...)
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  23.  10
    The Routledge Guidebook to Aquinas‘ Summa Theologiae.Jason T. Eberl - 2015 - Routledge.
    The Routledge Guidebook to Aquinas‘ Summa Theologiae introduces readers to a work which represents the pinnacle of medieval Western scholarship and which has inspired numerous commentaries, imitators, and opposing views. Outlining the main arguments Aquinas utilizes to support his conclusions on various philosophical questions, this clear and comprehensive guide explores: The historical context in which Aquinas wrote A critical discussion of the topics outlined in the text including theology, metaphysics, epistemology, psychology, ethics, and political theory. The ongoing influence of Summa (...)
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  24.  54
    The ontological and moral significance of persons.Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - Scientia et Fides 5 (2):217-236.
    Many debates in arenas such as bioethics turn on questions regarding the moral status of human beings at various stages of biological development or decline. It is often argued that a human being possesses a fundamental and inviolable moral status insofar as she is a “person”; yet, it is contested whether all or only human beings count as persons. Perhaps there are non-human person, and perhaps not every human being satisfies the definitional criteria for being a person. A further question, (...)
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  25.  46
    Whose Head, Which Body?Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (4):221-223.
    Response to human head transplant proposal and pertinent personal identity questions.
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  26.  31
    Metaphysics, Reason, and Religion in Secular Clinical Ethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (6):17-18.
    I support Abram Brummett’s contention that there is a need for secular clinical ethics to acknowledge that various positions typically advocated for by ethicists, concerning bedside decision-making and broader policy-making, rely upon metaphysical commitments that are not often explicit. I further note that calls for “neutrality” in debates concerning conscientious refusals to provide legal health care services—such as elective abortion or medical aid-in-dying—may exhibit biases against specific metaphysical claims regarding, for instance, the ontological and moral status of fetuses or the (...)
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  27.  56
    Religious and Secular Perspectives on the Value of Suffering.Jason T. Eberl - 2012 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12 (2):251-261.
    Advocates of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide argue that a patient’s intractable pain and suffering are a sufficient justification for his life to end if he autonomously so chooses. Others hold that the non-utilization of life-sustaining treatment, the use of pain-relieving medication that may hasten a patient’s death, and palliative sedation may be morally acceptable means of alleviating pain and suffering. How a patient should be cared for when approaching the end of life involves one’s core religious and moral values, (...)
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  28.  24
    Visions of the Common Good: Engelhardt’s Engagement with Catholic Social Teaching.Jason T. Eberl - 2021 - Christian Bioethics 27 (1):30-49.
    In this paper, I confront Engelhardt’s views—conceptualized as a cohesive moral perspective grounded in a combination of secular and Christian moral requirements—on two fronts. First, I critique his view of the moral demands of justice within a secular pluralistic society by showing how Thomistic natural law theory provides a content-full theory of human flourishing that is rationally articulable and defensible as a canonical vision of the good, even if it is not universally recognized as such. Second, I defend the principles (...)
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  29.  40
    Creating non-human persons: Might it be worth the risk?Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):52 – 54.
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  30.  31
    Actual Human Persons Are Sexed, Unified Beings.Elliott Louis Bedford & Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - Ethics and Medics 42 (10):1-3.
    Recently, Edward Furton commented on an article that we published in Health Care Ethics USA concerning the philosophical and theological anthropology informing the discussion of appropriate care for individuals with gender dysphoria and intersex conditions. We appreciate the opportunity to clarify the points we made in that article, particularly the metaphysical mechanics underlying our contention that, as part of a unified human person, the human rational soul is sexed. We hope this more in-depth metaphysical explanation shows that Furton’s concern, while (...)
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  31.  57
    Varieties of Dualism: Swinburne and Aquinas.Jason T. Eberl - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (1):39-56.
    Thomas Aquinas argues that matter is informed by a rational soul to compose a human person. But a person may survive her body’s death since a rational soul is able to exist and function without matter. This leads to the typical characterization of Aquinas as a dualist. Thomistic dualism, however, is distinct from both Platonic dualism and various accounts of substance dualism offered by philosophers such as Richard Swinburne. For both Plato and Swinburne, a person is identical to an immaterial (...)
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  32.  24
    The End of (Lockean-Kantian) Personhood.Jason T. Eberl - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (1):27-29.
    As the author of a book entitled The Nature of Human Persons: Metaphysics and Bioethics (Eberl 2020), one might reasonably expect me to lament Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby’s (2024) call to end the use...
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  33.  29
    The Complex Nature of Jewish and Catholic Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):31-32.
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  34.  21
    Clarifying the Philosophical and Legal Foundations of Dobbs.Francis J. Beckwith & Jason T. Eberl - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (2):25-28.
    We share Minkoff et al.’s (2024) concern regarding the potential disavowal of pregnant patients’ right to refuse medical interventions, without or against their explicit consent, aimed at preservin...
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  35.  52
    Exercising Restraint in the Creation of Animal–Human Chimeras.Jason T. Eberl & Rebecca A. Ballard - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):45 – 46.
  36.  62
    Ontological Kinds Versus Biological Species.Jason T. Eberl - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):32-34.
  37.  29
    Surviving Corruptionist Arguments: Response to Nevitt.Jason T. Eberl - 2020 - Quaestiones Disputatae 10 (2):145-160.
    Turner Nevitt’s elucidates and critically engages with what he describes as the “deeper and more problematic disagreements between survivalists and corruptionists about how to understand some of the most basic principles of Aquinas’s metaphysics,” his goal being to “advance some more systematic reasons for thinking that corruptionists are right and survivalists are wrong—both about how to understand the basic principles of Aquinas’s metaphysics, and about how to apply them to the question about the status of human beings or persons between (...)
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  38. Metaphysical and Moral Status of Cryopreserved Embryos.Jason T. Eberl - 2012 - The Linacre Quarterly 79 (3):304-315.
    Those who oppose human embryonic stem cell research argue for a clear position on the metaphysical and moral status of human embryos. This position does not differ whether the embryo is present inside its mother’s reproductive tract or in a cryopreservation tank. It is worth examining, however, whether an embryo in “suspended animation” has the same status as one actively developing in utero. I will explore this question from the perspective of Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical account of human nature. I conclude (...)
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  39. Aquinas on Euthanasia, Suffering, and Palliative Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (2):331-354.
    Euthanasia, today, is one of the most debated issues in bioethics. Euthanasia, at the time of Thomas Aquinas, was an unheard-of term. Nevertheless, while there is no direct statement with respect to “euthanasia” per se in the writings of Aquinas, Aquinas’s moral theory and certain theological commitments he held could be applied to the euthanasia question and thus bring Aquinas into contemporary bioethical debate. In this paper, I present the relevant aspects of Aquinas’s account of natural law and his theological (...)
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  40.  23
    A Bioethical Vision.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 16 (2):279-293.
    Pope Francis has not put himself at the forefront of tendentious issues in bioethics, such as abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, cloning, contraception, and euthanasia. Nevertheless, his various addresses and magisterial documents such as Evangelii Gaudium and Laudato Si’ make clear that Pope Francis affirms the Church’s teaching on these issues. He has, though, proffered an additional moral lens through which to view such issues, namely, how they factor into the “culture of waste” that informs global society’s “sin of (...)
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  41.  22
    Conscientious objection in health care.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):483-486.
    Introduction to a special issue of _Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics_ on whether health care professionals should have a legally-protected right to conscientiously refuse to provide legal services that are autonomously requested by patients. Outlines the parameters of the current debate in the bioethics literature and orients readers to the articles the special issue comprises.
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  42.  44
    Cultivating the Virtue of Acknowledged Responsibility.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:249-261.
    In debates over issues such as abortion, a primary principle on which the Roman Catholic outlook is based is the natural law mandate to respect human life rooted in the Aristotelian philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. This principle, however, is limited by focusing on the obligation not to kill innocent humans and thereby neglects another important facet of the Aristotelian-Thomistic ethical viewpoint—namely, obligations that bind human beings in relationships of mutual dependence and responsibility. I argue that there is a need to (...)
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  43.  32
    Cultivating the Virtue of Acknowledged Responsibility.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:249-261.
    In debates over issues such as abortion, a primary principle on which the Roman Catholic outlook is based is the natural law mandate to respect human life rooted in the Aristotelian philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. This principle, however, is limited by focusing on the obligation not to kill innocent humans and thereby neglects another important facet of the Aristotelian-Thomistic ethical viewpoint—namely, obligations that bind human beings in relationships of mutual dependence and responsibility. I argue that there is a need to (...)
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  44.  55
    The moral status of 'unborn children' without rights.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):44 – 46.
  45.  72
    A thomistic perspective on the beginning of personhood: Redux.Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):283–289.
    Response to Jan Deckers' critique of the author's earlier article on the beginning of personhood from a Thomistic perspective in which the author revises and further refines his view.
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  46.  6
    Distinguishing Ethical from Diagnostic Concerns About NRP-cDCD.Kyle E. Karches & Jason T. Eberl - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (6):69-71.
    Bernat (2024) and Busch (2024) both argue that the clamping of cerebral vasculature in NRP-cDCD ensures sufficient diagnostic certainty of death that the procedure does not violate the Dead Donor R...
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  47.  64
    The Metaphysics of Resurrection.Jason T. Eberl - 2000 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:215-230.
    Thomas Aquinas was concerned with developing a metaphysical account of the article of Christian faith which asserts that a human person will experience a bodily resurrection at some point after death. This article of faith is prima facie in line with Aquinas’ Aristotelian assertions that a human soul is incorruptible per se and that it is in its natural state only when it is united to a material body of which it is the informing principle. But how is personal identity (...)
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  48.  89
    Fetuses Are Neither Violinists nor Violators.Jason T. Eberl - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):53-54.
  49.  13
    The Ultimate Star Trek and Philosophy: The Search for Socrates.William Irwin, Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) - 2016 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Reunites the editors of Star Trek and Philosophy with Starfleet’s finest experts for 31 new, highly logical essays Features a complete examination of the Star Trek universe, from the original series to the most recent films directed by J.J. Abrams, Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness Introduces important concepts in philosophy through the vast array of provocative issues raised by the series, such as the ethics of the Prime Directive, Star Trek’s philosophy of peace, Data and Voyager’s Doctor as (...)
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  50.  36
    Advancing the Case for Organ Procurement.Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):22-23.
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