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Jason T. Eberl [73]Jason Thomas Eberl [1]
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Jason Eberl
Saint Louis University
  1. Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care.Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams - 2011 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed to enshrine (...)
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  2.  17
    Thomistic Principles and Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2006 - Routledge.
    Alongside a revival of interest in Thomism in philosophy, scholars have realised its relevance when addressing certain contemporary issues in bioethics. This book offers a rigorous interpretation of Aquinas's metaphysics and ethical thought, and highlights its significance to questions in bioethics. Jason T. Eberl applies Aquinas’s views on the seminal topics of human nature and morality to key questions in bioethics at the margins of human life – questions which are currently contested in the academia, politics and the media such (...)
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  3.  3
    Protecting Reasonable Conscientious Refusals in Health Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):565-581.
    Recently, debate over whether health care providers should have a protected right to conscientiously refuse to offer legal health care services—such as abortion, elective sterilization, aid in dying, or treatments for transgender patients—has grown exponentially. I advance a modified compromise view that bases respect for claims of conscientious refusal to provide specific health care services on a publicly defensible rationale. This view requires health care providers who refuse such services to disclose their availability by other providers, as well as to (...)
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  4.  10
    Can Prudence Be Enhanced?Jason T. Eberl - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (5):506-526.
    Some bioethicists have argued that moral bioenhancement, complementing traditional means of enhancing individuals’ moral dispositions, is essential if we are to survive as a species. Traditional means of moral enhancement have historically included civil legislation, socially recognized moral exemplars, religious teachings and disciplines, and familial upbringing. I explore the necessity and feasibility of pursuing methods of moral bioenhancement as a complement to such traditional means, grounding my analysis within a virtue-theoretic framework. Specifically, I focus on the essential intellectual virtue for (...)
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  5.  15
    I Am My Brother’s Keeper: Communitarian Obligations to the Dying Person.Jason T. Eberl - 2018 - Christian Bioethics 24 (1):38-58.
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  6. Do Human Persons Persist Between Death and Resurrection?Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - In Kevin Timpe & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. Routledge.
     
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  7. Metaphysical and Moral Status of Cryopreserved Embryos.Jason T. Eberl - 2012 - The Linacre Quarterly 79 (3):304-315.
    Those who oppose human embryonic stem cell research argue for a clear position on the metaphysical and moral status of human embryos. This position does not differ whether the embryo is present inside its mother’s reproductive tract or in a cryopreservation tank. It is worth examining, however, whether an embryo in “suspended animation” has the same status as one actively developing in utero. I will explore this question from the perspective of Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical account of human nature. I conclude (...)
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  8. Varieties of Dualism: Swinburne and Aquinas.Jason T. Eberl - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (1):39-56.
    Thomas Aquinas argues that matter is informed by a rational soul to compose a human person. But a person may survive her body’s death since a rational soul is able to exist and function without matter. This leads to the typical characterization of Aquinas as a dualist. Thomistic dualism, however, is distinct from both Platonic dualism and various accounts of substance dualism offered by philosophers such as Richard Swinburne. For both Plato and Swinburne, a person is identical to an immaterial (...)
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  9.  39
    The Beginning of Personhood: A Thomistic Biological Analysis.Jason T. Eberl - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (2):134–157.
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  10.  35
    A Thomistic Understanding of Human Death.Jason T. Eberl - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (1):29–48.
    ABSTRACTI investigate Thomas Aquinas's metaphysical account of human death, which is defined in terms of a rational soul separating from its material body. The question at hand concerns what criterion best determines when this separation occurs. Aquinas argues that a body has a rational soul only insofar as it is properly organised to support the soul's vegetative, sensitive, and rational capacities. According to the ‘higher‐brain’ concept of death, when a body can no longer provide the biological foundation necessary for the (...)
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  11.  21
    The ontological and moral significance of persons.Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - Scientia et Fides 5 (2):217-236.
    Many debates in arenas such as bioethics turn on questions regarding the moral status of human beings at various stages of biological development or decline. It is often argued that a human being possesses a fundamental and inviolable moral status insofar as she is a “person”; yet, it is contested whether all or only human beings count as persons. Perhaps there are non-human person, and perhaps not every human being satisfies the definitional criteria for being a person. A further question, (...)
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  12.  13
    Whose Head, Which Body?Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (4):221-223.
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  13.  37
    Thomas Aquinas: Teacher and Scholar Four Courts Press, 2012. Edited by James McEvoy, Michael W. Dunne and Julia Hynes. Four Courts Press, 2012, 264pp., €55.00 ISBN – 978-1-84682-308-4. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (1):164-169.
  14.  32
    Aquinas on the Nature of Human Beings.Jason T. Eberl - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):333 - 365.
    IN THIS PAPER, I PROVIDE A FORMULATION of Thomas Aquinas’s account of the nature of human beings for the purpose of comparing it with other accounts in both the history of philosophy and contemporary analytic philosophy. I discuss how his apparently dualistic understanding of the relationship between soul and body yields the conclusion that a human being exists as a unified substance composed of a rational soul informing, that is, serving as the specific organizing principle of, a physical body. I (...)
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  15.  20
    Creating Non-Human Persons: Might It Be Worth the Risk?Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):52 – 54.
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  16.  45
    Aquinas on Euthanasia, Suffering, and Palliative Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (2):331-354.
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  17.  19
    The Complex Nature of Jewish and Catholic Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):31-32.
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  18.  32
    The Moral Status of 'Unborn Children' Without Rights.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):44 – 46.
  19.  25
    Exercising Restraint in the Creation of Animal–Human Chimeras.Jason T. Eberl & Rebecca A. Ballard - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):45 – 46.
  20.  5
    Conscientious Objection in Health Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):483-486.
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  21.  47
    A Thomistic Appraisal of Human Enhancement Technologies.Jason T. Eberl - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (4):289-310.
    Debate concerning human enhancement often revolves around the question of whether there is a common “nature” that all human beings share and which is unwarrantedly violated by enhancing one’s capabilities beyond the “species-typical” norm. I explicate Thomas Aquinas’s influential theory of human nature, noting certain key traits commonly shared among human beings that define each as a “person” who possesses inviolable moral status. Understanding the specific qualities that define the nature of human persons, which includes self-conscious awareness, capacity for intellective (...)
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  22.  48
    Fetuses Are Neither Violinists nor Violators.Jason T. Eberl - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):53-54.
  23.  53
    Potentiality, Possibility, and the Irreversibility of Death.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):61-77.
    This paper considers the issue of cryopreservation and the definition of death from an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective. A central conceptual focus throughout this discussion is the purportedly irreversible nature of death and the criteria by which a human body is considered to be informed by a rational soul. It concludes that a cryopreserved corpse fails to have “life potentially in it” sufficient to satisfy Aristotle’s definition of ensoulment. Therefore, if the possibility that such a corpse may be successfully preserved and resuscitated (...)
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  24.  18
    Advancing the Case for Organ Procurement.Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):22-23.
  25.  35
    The Metaphysics of Resurrection.Jason T. Eberl - 2000 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:215-230.
  26.  32
    Religious and Secular Perspectives on the Value of Suffering.Jason T. Eberl - 2012 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12 (2):251-261.
    Advocates of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide argue that a patient’s intractable pain and suffering are a sufficient justification for his life to end if he autonomously so chooses. Others hold that the non-utilization of life-sustaining treatment, the use of pain-relieving medication that may hasten a patient’s death, and palliative sedation may be morally acceptable means of alleviating pain and suffering. How a patient should be cared for when approaching the end of life involves one’s core religious and moral values, (...)
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  27.  61
    Ford, Norman M., S.D.B. The Prenatal Person: Ethics From Conception to Birth.Jason T. Eberl - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (1):216-218.
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  28.  11
    The Metaphysics of Resurrection: Issues of Identity in Aquinas.Jason T. Eberl - 2000 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:215-230.
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  29. Thomism and the Beginning of Personhood.Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  30.  38
    A Thomistic Perspective on the Beginning of Personhood: Redux.Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):283–289.
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  31.  15
    Extraordinary Care and the Spiritual Goal of Life.Jason T. Eberl - 2005 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (3):491-501.
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  32.  21
    Aquinas. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (1):196-197.
    Eleonore Stump provides a clear and thorough treatment of some of the main philosophical themes that characterize Aquinas’s vast corpus in a way that allows his thought to be situated among contemporary philosophers and their ideas. This approach allows Stump to address certain criticisms that have been raised against Aquinas’s views as well as the medieval Christian approach to philosophy in general. The proper consideration owed to Aquinas as a key figure in the history of philosophy is given sound support (...)
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  33.  17
    Cultivating the Virtue of Acknowledged Responsibility.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:249-261.
    In debates over issues such as abortion, a primary principle on which the Roman Catholic outlook is based is the natural law mandate to respect human life rooted in the Aristotelian philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. This principle, however, is limited by focusing on the obligation not to kill innocent humans and thereby neglects another important facet of the Aristotelian-Thomistic ethical viewpoint—namely, obligations that bind human beings in relationships of mutual dependence and responsibility. I argue that there is a need to (...)
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  34.  31
    Human Dignity in the Biotech Century: A Christian Vision for Public Policy. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):510-512.
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  35.  6
    Forgiveness.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 82:249-261.
    In debates over issues such as abortion, a primary principle on which the Roman Catholic outlook is based is the natural law mandate to respect human life rooted in the Aristotelian philosophy of Thomas Aquinas. This principle, however, is limited by focusing on the obligation not to kill innocent humans and thereby neglects another important facet of the Aristotelian-Thomistic ethical viewpoint—namely, obligations that bind human beings in relationships of mutual dependence and responsibility. I argue that there is a need to (...)
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  36.  29
    Double-Effect Reasoning: Doing Good and Avoiding Evil. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):295-298.
  37.  3
    A Bioethical Vision.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 16 (2):279-293.
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  38.  25
    Death and Dying: A Reader. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2006 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (1):141-144.
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  39.  25
    Practical Philosophy: Ethics, Society and Culture. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (2):345-348.
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  40.  24
    Enhancing Human Capacities Edited by Julian Savulescu, Ruud ter Meulen, and Guy Kahane. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2013 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13 (3):565-567.
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  41.  35
    Dualist and Animalist Perspectives on Death: A Comparison with Aquinas.Jason T. Eberl - 2007 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (3):477-490.
  42.  19
    Theological Bioethics: Participation, Justice, and Change. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):615-618.
  43.  30
    Dombrowski, Daniel A. Not Even a Sparrow Falls: The Philosophy of Stephen R. L. Clark.Jason T. Eberl - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):131-132.
  44.  14
    The Case for Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Human Enhancement. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2017 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 17 (1):178-179.
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  45.  4
    Not Even a Sparrow Falls: The Philosophy of Stephen R. L. Clark. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):131-131.
    Stephen R. L. Clark has authored twelve books covering three philosophical themes: religion, duties toward animals, and politics—“Unfortunately, however, those familiar with one realm of his work, tend not to be familiar with what he has done in other areas”. Even those who may be familiar with the whole of Clark’s corpus may find it difficult to discern a coherent philosophical message among these disparate themes. Dombrowski seeks to present a comprehensive overview of Clark’s thought, and to elucidate Clark’s primary (...)
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  46.  18
    Human Capacities and Moral Status by Russell DiSilvestro. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2011 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (3):586-588.
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  47.  18
    Truly Human Enhancement: A Philosophical Defense of Limits, by Nicholas Agar. [REVIEW]Jason T. Eberl - 2015 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 15 (4):781-784.
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  48.  32
    Ontological Kinds Versus Biological Species.Jason T. Eberl - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):32-34.
  49.  23
    “I Am an Instrument of God “: Religious Belief, Atheism, and Meaning.Jason T. Eberl & Jennifer A. Vines - 2008 - In Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There. Wiley-Blackwell.
  50.  21
    What Dignitas Personae Does Not Say.Jason T. Eberl - 2010 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10 (1):89-110.
    Dignitas personae has garnered significant attention both inside and outside Roman Catholic circles, but it lacks the argumentative force not only to present the Church’s ethical judgment but also to persuade non-sympathetic readers. More direct engagement with contrary views would provide a stronger foundation for constructing arguments in public discourse. This article highlights various assertions found in Dignitas personae which call for greater explicit argumentation. Subjects treated include the ontological and moral status of human embryos, prenatal adoption, potentially abortifacient contraceptives, (...)
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