Results for 'Jealousy'

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Bibliography: Jealousy in Normative Ethics
  1.  33
    Jealousy as a Specific Emotion: The Dynamic Functional Model.Mingi Chung & Christine R. Harris - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):272-287.
    We review the jealousy literature and present our Dynamic Functional Model of Jealousy, which argues that jealousy evolved and has its own unique motivational state aimed at preventing others from usurping important relationships. It has a core form that exists in infants and nonhuman animals and an elaborated form in humans that emerges as cognitive sophistication develops. The DFMJ proposes that jealousy is an unfolding process with early and late phases that can be differentially impacted by (...)
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  2.  58
    Jealousy Revisited: Recent Philosophical Work on a Maligned Emotion.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice (3):1-14.
    Taking as its starting point a previous work by the author which reviewed early philosophical sources on jealousy and proposed both a conceptual and moral account of this much-maligned emotion, the present article reviews the relevant philosophical literature from the last decade or so. Most noticeable is how scarce those sources still are. Special attention is given, however, to a new conceptual model proposed by Purshouse and Fredericks which rejects the standard architectonic of jealousy as a three-party compound (...)
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  3. Jealousy in Relation to Envy.Luke Purshouse - 2004 - Erkenntnis 60 (2):179-205.
    The conceptions of jealousy used by philosophical writers are various, and, this paper suggests, largely inadequate. In particular, the difference between jealousy and envy has not yet been plausibly specified. This paper surveys some past analyses of this distinction and addresses problems with them, before proposing its own positive account of jealousy, developed from an idea of Leila Tov-Ruach(a.k.a. A. O. Rorty). Three conditions for being jealous are proposed and it is shownhow each of them helps to (...)
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  4.  85
    Justifying Emotions: Pride and Jealousy.Kristjan Kristjansson - 2001 - Routledge.
    The two central emotions of pride and jealousy have long been held to have no role in moral judgements, and have been a source of controversy in both ethics and moral psychology. Kristjan Kristjansson challenges this common view and argues that emotions are central to moral excellence and that both pride and jealousy are indeed ingredients of a well-rounded virtuous life.
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  5. Jealousy, Attention and Loss.Leila Tov-Ruach - 1980 - In A. O. Rorty (ed.), Explaining Emotions. Univ of California Pr. pp. 465--488.
     
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  6. Jealousy.Daniel M. Farrell - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (4):527-559.
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  7.  90
    Jealousy.Michael J. Wreen - 1989 - Noûs 23 (5):635-652.
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  8. Morbid Jealousy as a Function of Fitness-Related Life-Cycle Dimensions.Lucas D. Schipper, Judith A. Easton & Todd K. Shackelford - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):630-630.
    We suggest that morbid jealousy falls on the extreme end of a jealousy continuum. Thus, many features associated with normal jealousy will be present in individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy. We apply Boyer & Lienard's (B&L's) prediction one (P1; target article, sect. 7.1) to morbid jealousy, suggesting that fitness-related life-cycle dimensions predict sensitivity to cues, and frequency, intensity, and content of intrusive thoughts of partner infidelity. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  9.  25
    Jealousy as a Specific Emotion: The Dynamic Functional Model.Jan E. Stets - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):289-291.
    The article by Chung and Harris brings together an impressive array of literature to formulate a dynamic functional model of jealousy. There is much to like about the model. However, one concern is how it advances a theory of jealousy. Another concern is how the DFMJ operates over time, with different social groups, and cross-culturally. In general, however, the model offers a useful way to think about jealousy for the future.
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  10.  7
    Jealousy Revisited: Recent Philosophical Work on a Maligned Emotion.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (3):741-754.
    Taking as its starting point a previous work by the author which reviewed early philosophical sources on jealousy and proposed both a conceptual and moral account of this much-maligned emotion, the present article reviews the relevant philosophical literature from the last decade or so. Most noticeable is how scarce those sources still are. Special attention is given, however, to a new conceptual model proposed by Purshouse and Fredericks which rejects the standard architectonic of jealousy as a three-party compound (...)
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  11.  21
    Author Reply: What Jealousy Can Tell Us About Theories of Emotion.Christine R. Harris & Mingi Chung - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):291-292.
    We clarify aspects of our Dynamic Functional Model of Jealousy in response to D’Arms and Stets. Our model proposes that jealousy is an evolved motivational state that arises over threat by a rival to one’s relationship or some aspect of one’s relationship. The formation or loss of relationships rarely occurs instantaneously. Therefore, we argue that jealousy, whose goal is to remove or reduce the rival threat, can occur over a longer time course than is often assumed in (...)
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  12.  21
    Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens: A Socio-Psychological Approach.Ed Sanders - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens examines the sensation, expression, and literary representation of envy and jealousy in Classical Athens.
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  13. Jealousy, Shame, and the Rival.Jeffrie G. Murphy - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):143 - 150.
    This essay is a critique of the two chapters on jealousy in Jerome Neu's book A Tear is an Intellectual Thing. The rival — as anobject of both fear and hatred — is of central importance in romantic jealousy, but it is here argued that the role of the rival cannot be fully understood in Neu's account of jealousy and that shame (not noted by Neu) must be seen as central to the concept of jealousy if (...)
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  14.  10
    The Jealousy of the Gods and Criminal Law at Athens.T. B. L. W. & Svend Ranulf - 1933 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 53 (9):327.
  15.  19
    The Jealousy of the Gods and Criminal Law at Athens.R. S. - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (9):248.
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  16. Envy and Jealousy.Aaron Ben-Ze’ev - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):487 - 516.
    Envy involves the wish to have something that someone else has; jealousy involves the wish not to lose something that the subject has and someone else does not. Envy and jealousy would seem to involve a similar emotional attitude. Both are concerned with a change in what one has: either a wish to obtain or a fear of losing. This is not a negligible distinction, however. The wish not to lose something is notably different from the wish to (...)
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  17. ‘I'm Not Envious, I'm Just Jealous!’: On the Difference Between Envy and Jealousy.Sara Protasi - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (3):316-333.
    I argue for the view that envy and jealousy are distinct emotions, whose crucial difference is that envy involves a perception of lack while jealousy involves a perception of loss. I start by noting the common practice of using ‘envy’ and ‘jealousy’ almost interchangeably, and I contrast it with the empirical evidence that shows that envy and jealousy are distinct, albeit similar and often co-occurring, emotions. I then argue in favor of a specific way of understanding (...)
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  18. Troubling Others and Tormenting Ourselves: The Nature and Moral Significance of Jealousy.Rachel Fredericks - 2012 - Dissertation, University of Washington
    Jealousy is an emotion that arises in diverse circumstances and is experienced in phenomenologically diverse ways. In part because of this diversity, evaluations of jealous subjects tend to be conflicting and ambiguous. Thus philosophers who are interested in the moral status of jealousy face a challenge: to explain how, despite the diversity of jealous subjects and experiences of jealousy, our moral evaluations of those subjects in light of those experiences might be unified. In this project, I confront (...)
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  19.  24
    Concluding Commentary: Schadenfreude, Gluckschmerz, Jealousy, and Hate—What (and When, and Why) Are the Emotions?Ira J. Roseman & Amanda K. Steele - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):327-340.
    Schadenfreude, gluckschmerz, jealousy, and hate are distinctive emotional phenomena, understudied and deserving of increased attention. The authors of this special section have admirably synthesized large literatures, describing major characteristics, eliciting conditions, and functions. We discuss the contributions of each article as well as the issues they raise for theories of emotions and some remaining questions, and suggest ways in which these might be profitably addressed.
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  20. Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - Philosophy and Literature.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how (...)
     
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  21.  26
    Jealousy and Envy.Martin P. East & Fraser N. Watts - 1999 - In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley. pp. 569--588.
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  22.  35
    Romantic Jealousy in Early Adulthood and in Later Life.Todd K. Shackelford, Martin Voracek, David P. Schmitt, David M. Buss, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford & Richard L. Michalski - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (3):283-300.
    Young men are more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity, whereas young women are more distressed by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The present research investigated (a) whether the sex difference in jealousy replicates in an older sample, and (b) whether younger people differ from older people in their selection of the more distressing infidelity scenario. We presented forced-choice dilemmas to 202 older people (mean age = 67 years) and to 234 younger people (mean age = 20 years). The sex (...)
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  23.  69
    The Evolution of Jealousy.David M. Buss & Martie Haselton - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):506-507.
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  24.  27
    Jealousy and Emotional Responsiveness in Young Children with ASD.Nirit Bauminger, Liza Chomsky-Smolkin, Efrat Orbach-Caspi, Ditza Zachor & Rachel Levy-Shiff - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (4):595-619.
  25. Envy and Jealousy: Emotions and Vices.Gabriele Taylor - 1988 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):233-249.
  26.  36
    Predictors of Organizational Citizenship Behavior: Ethical Leadership and Workplace Jealousy.Yau-De Wang & Wen-Chuan Sung - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (1):117-128.
    This study examined the relationships of perceived ethical leadership, workplace jealousy, and organizational citizenship behaviors directed at individuals and organizations. Survey responses were collected from 491 employee-coworker pairs from 33 hospitals in Taiwan. The employees provided assessments of their perceived ethical leadership and the workplace jealousy they experienced, while the coworkers provided information about the employees’ OCBI and OCBO. In the hypotheses testing, perceived ethical leadership was found to be negatively related to employees’ workplace jealousy and (...) was negatively related to their OCBI and OCBO. Workplace jealousy partially mediated the effect of ethical leadership on OCBI and OCBO. In addition, perceived ethical leadership was found to have a moderation effect on the jealousy-OCBI/ocbo relationship. This study contributes to the literature of ethical leadership as well as to the literature of OCB by relating workplace jealousy to OCB and by making sense of the effects of ethical leadership on OCB through the mediation of jealousy and through the moderation of ethical leadership on the jealousy-OCB relationship. (shrink)
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  27.  29
    Proximal Foundations of Jealousy: Expectations of Exclusivity in the Infant’s First Year of Life.Sybil L. Hart - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (4):358-366.
    In this synthesis, we summarize studies that yielded evidence of jealousy in young infants. To shed light on this phenomenon, we present evidence that jealousy’s foundation rests on history of dyadic interactions with caregivers which engender infants’ expectations of exclusivity, and on maturation of sociocognitive capacities that enable infants to evaluate whether an exchange between their caregiver and another child represents a violation of that expectation. We conclude with a call for greater study of the antecedents and sequelae (...)
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  28.  45
    Estrogens and Relationship Jealousy.David C. Geary, M. Catherine DeSoto, Mary K. Hoard, Melanie Skaggs Sheldon & M. Lynne Cooper - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (4):299-320.
    The relation between sex hormones and responses to partner infidelity was explored in two studies reported here. The first confirmed the standard sex difference in relationship jealousy, that males (n=133) are relatively more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity and females (n=159) by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The study also revealed that females using hormone-based birth control (n=61) tended more toward sexual jealousy than did other females, and reported more intense affective responses to partner infidelity (n=77). In study (...)
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  29.  49
    Evolution of Human Jealousy a Just-so Story or a Just-so Criticism?Neven Sesardic - 2003 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (4):427-443.
    To operationalize the methodological assessment of evolutionary psychology, three requirements are proposed that, if satisfied, would show that a hypothesis is not a just-so story: (1) theoretical entrenchment (i.e., that the hypothesis under consideration is a consequence of a more fundamental theory that is empirically well-confirmed across a very wide range of phenomena), (2) predictive success (i.e., that the hypothesis generates concrete predictions that make it testable and eventually to a certain extent corroborated), and (3) failure of rival explanations (i.e., (...)
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  30. Jealousy.Peter Toohey - 2014 - Yale University Press.
    _A witty and insightful investigation into the green-eyed monster’s role in our lives_ Compete, acquire, succeed, enjoy: the pressures of living in today’s materialistic world seem predicated upon jealousy—the feelings of rivalry and resentment for possession of whatever the other has. But while our newspapers abound with stories of the sometimes droll, sometimes deadly consequences of sexual jealousy, Peter Toohey argues in this charmingly provocative book that jealousy is much more than the destructive emotion it is commonly (...)
     
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  31.  45
    Jealousy: A Response to Infidelity? On the Nature and Appropriateness Conditions of Jealousy.Anna Welpinghus - 2017 - Philosophical Explorations 20 (3):322-337.
    This paper critically assesses the widespread claim that jealousy is a response to infidelity. According to this claim, herewith called the entitlement theory, jealousy is only an appropriate response to a relationship between a loved one and a rival if, by entertaining this relationship, the loved one does not treat the jealous person the way she is entitled to be treated. I reconstruct different versions of ET, each of them providing a different answer to the question why we (...)
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  32. Fiction, Pity, Fear, and Jealousy.Colin Radford - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):71-75.
  33.  36
    Morbid Jealousy and Sex Differences in Partner-Directed Violence.Judith A. Easton & Todd K. Shackelford - 2009 - Human Nature 20 (3):342-350.
    Previous research suggests that individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy have jealousy mechanisms that are activated at lower thresholds than individuals with normal jealousy, but that these mechanisms produce behavior that is similar to individuals with normal jealousy. We extended previous research documenting these similarities by investigating sex differences in partner-directed violence committed by individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy. The results support some of our predictions. For example, a greater percentage of men than women diagnosed with (...)
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  34.  20
    An Exploration of Jealousy in Nursing: A Kleinian Analysis.Alicia M. Evans, Michael Traynor & Nel Glass - 2014 - Nursing Inquiry 21 (2):171-178.
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  35. Of the Jealousy of Trade.David Hume - unknown
  36.  11
    Jealousy and Self-Knowledge.Bèla Szabados - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 3:477-481.
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  37.  11
    The Jealousy of the Gods and Criminal Law at Athens. By Svend Ranulf. Pp. 161. Copenhagen: Levin and Munksgaard; London: Williams and Norgate, 1933. [REVIEW]B. L. W. T. - 1933 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 53 (2):327-327.
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  38.  8
    The Jealousy of the Gods and Criminal Law at Athens. II. By Svend Ranulf. Pp. 161. Copenhagen: Levin and Munksgaard; and London: Williams and Norgate, 1933. 12s. 6d. [REVIEW]B. L. W. T. - 1934 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 54 (2):223-223.
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  39.  10
    Masculine Jealousy and the Struggle for Possession in The End of the Affair.Candida Yates - 2006 - Journal for Cultural Research 10 (3):219-235.
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  40.  24
    On the Nature of Jealousy.Hubert Tellenbach - 1974 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 4 (2):461-468.
  41. "Sex and Jealousy" By.Hugh LaFollette - 1996 - In Personal Relationships: Love, Identity, and Morality. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell.
    Whenever two people have a close relationship, one or both of them may occasionally become jealous. Jealousy can occur in any type of relationship, although it is more frequent and typically more potent between lovers. Hence, I shall begin by discussing jealousy among lovers. Later I will show how that account is also applicable to other close personal relationships.
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  42. The Feminist Phenomenology of Excess: Ontological Multiplicity, Auto-Jealousy, and Suicide in Beauvoir’s L’Invitée.Jennifer McWeeny - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):41-75.
    In this paper, I present a new reading of Simone de Beauvoir’s first major work, L’Invitée ( She Came to Stay ), in order to reveal the text as a vital place of origin for feminist phenomenological philosophy. My reading of L’Invitée departs from most scholarly interpretations of the text in three notable respects: (1) it is inclusive of the “two unpublished chapters” that were excised from the original manuscript at the publisher’s request, (2) it takes seriously Beauvoir’s claim that (...)
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  43.  54
    Private Feelings, Public Expressions: Professional Jealousy and the Moral Practice of Teaching.Yen-Hsin Chen & Kristján Kristjánsson - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):349-358.
    This paper explores the issue of personal factors that impinge upon education. More specifically, it addresses professional jealousy among teachers and how it affects the moral practice of teaching. Our focus is teachers? emotions in general and teachers? jealousies in particular, in the context of the ideal of the moral teacher. We identify and criticise three common dichotomies that tend to mar explorations of teachers? emotions. We illustrate issues of professional jealousy as revealed in an interview with a (...)
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  44.  21
    Challenges for the Dynamic Functional Model of Jealousy.Justin D’Arms - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):288-289.
    This comment on Chung and Harris presses for a clearer account of the motivational role of jealousy within the dynamic functional model of jealousy. It also calls into question the inclusion of “elaborated” jealousy within the emotion itself. It argues that differentiating emotional motivation from motivation toward the same goal that an emotion has requires additional resources.
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  45.  25
    Double Standards for Sexual Jealousy.Luci Paul, Mark A. Foss & Mary Ann Baenninger - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (3):291-321.
    This work tests two conflicting views about double standards: whether they reflect evolved sex differences in behavior or a manipulative morality serving male interests. Two questionnaires on jealous reactions to mild (flirting) and serious (cheating) sexual transgressions were randomly assigned to 172 young women and men. One questionnaire assessed standards for appropriate behavior and perceptions of how young women and men usually react. The second asked people to report how they had reacted or, if naive, how they would react. The (...)
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  46.  52
    Lying, Despair, Jealousy, Envy, Sex, Suicide, Drugs, and the Good Life.Leslie H. Farber - 1978 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (4):590-591.
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  47.  53
    Why Persons Need Jealousy.Kristján Kristjánsson - 1996 - The Personalist Forum 12 (2):163-181.
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  48.  18
    Comment: Evolutionary Criteria for Considering an Emotion “Basic”: Jealousy as an Illustration.David M. Buss - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):313-315.
    Modern evolutionary psychology provides a cogent criterion for considering an emotion as “basic”: Whether the emotion evolved to solve an adaptive problem tributary to reproduction. Criteria such as distinctive universal signals, presence in other primates, or contribution to survival are not relevant, even though some basic emotions have these properties. Abundant evidence suggests that sexual jealousy is properly considered a basic emotion, even though it lacks a distinct expressive signature, contributes to adaptive problems of mating rather than survival, and (...)
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  49.  10
    Kant and Jealousy in Derrida's Glas.Christopher Lauer - 2009 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (1):54-65.
  50.  49
    Gender and Jealousy: Stories of Infidelity.John Sabini & Maury Silver - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (5):713-727.
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