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  1. A Marxist Philosophy of Language.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2006 - Brill.
  2.  65
    Deleuze and Language.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2002 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In the field of philosophy of language, is there life beyond Chomsky? Deleuze's deep distrust for, and fascination with language provide a positive answer - nothing less than a brand new philosophy of language, where pragmatics replaces structural linguistics, and where the literary text and the concept of style have pride of place. This should be good news not only for philosophers, but for linguistics and literary critics as well.
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  3.  51
    Deleuze, Guattari and Marxism.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2005 - Historical Materialism 13 (3):35-55.
  4. Philosophy of Nonsense: The Intuitions of Victorian Nonsense Literature.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 1994 - Routledge.
    'Jean-Jacques Lecercle's remarkable Philosophy of Nonsense offers a sustained and important account of an area that is usually hastily dismissed. Using the resources of contemporary philosophy - notably Deleuze and Lyotard - he manages to bring out the importance of nonsense' - Andrew Benjamin, University of Warwick Why are we, and in particular why are philosophers and linguists, so fascinated with nonsense? Why do Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear appear in so many otherwise dull and dry academic books? This amusing, (...)
     
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  5.  8
    Dispute, Quarrel, Interpellation.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2017 - Paragraph 40 (1):5-27.
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  6. Cantor, Lacan, Mao, Beckett, Meme Combat-The Philosophy of Alain Badiou.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 1999 - Radical Philosophy 93:6-13.
     
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  7. Philosophy Through the Looking-Glass: Language, Nonsense, Desire.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 1985 - Open Court.
    Délire is the disorderly side of language, a no man’s land between reason and gibberish. In this study, originally published in 1985, the author provides a history of _délire_, tracing its influence on philosophy, linguistics, literature and psychoanalysis. The author argues that _délire _provides a new approach to the classic philosophical problem of sense and nonsense.
     
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  8.  8
    Barthes Without Althusser: A Different Style of Marxism.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2008 - Paragraph 31 (1):72-83.
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  9. Christian Marazzi, Capital and Language: From the New Economy to the War Economy.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2009 - Radical Philosophy 155:53.
     
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  10.  6
    Louis Wolfson and the Philosophy of Translation.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 1989 - Oxford Literary Review 11 (1):103-120.
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  11.  13
    Lewis Carroll and the Talmud.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 1993 - Substance 22 (2/3):204.
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    Machinations deleuzo-guattariennes.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2012 - Actuel Marx 52 (2):108-120.
    Deleuzo-guattarian Machinations The essay revisits Deleuze and Guattari’s complex relation to Marxism, which it seeks to capture under the name para-Marxism, by way of a close reading of plateau n˚ 4 of A Thousand Plateaus, which criticizes the mainstream conception of language and draws on Lenin’s pamphlet on slogans. This close reading leads to an account of the articulation of the Deleuze and Guattari machine with the Marxist analysis of language, to be found, for purposes of comparison in Lukacs’s Ontology. (...)
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  13.  7
    Three-Way Games.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 1992 - Philosophy Today 36 (4):336-350.
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  14.  6
    La stylistique est morte, vive la stylistique.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 1993 - Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 71 (3):551-554.
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  15.  6
    Badiou and Deleuze Read Literature.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2010 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Why do philosophers read literature? How do they read it? And to what extent does their philosophy derive from their reading of literature? Anyone who has read contemporary European philosophers has had to ask such questions. This book is an attempt to answer them, by considering the ‘strong readings’ Alain Badiou and Gilles Deleuze impose on the texts they read. The author demonstrates that philosophers need literature as much as literary critics need philosophy: it is an exercise not in the (...)
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  16. Philosophy of Nonsense: The Intuitions of Victorian Nonsense Literature.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2012 - Routledge.
    _'Jean-Jacques Lecercle's remarkable _Philosophy of Nonsense___ offers a sustained and important account of an area that is usually hastily dismissed. Using the resources of contemporary philosophy - notably Deleuze and Lyotard - he manages to bring out the importance of nonsense'_ - _Andrew Benjamin, University of Warwick_ Why are we, and in particular why are philosophers and linguists, so fascinated with nonsense? Why do Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear appear in so many otherwise dull and dry academic books? This amusing, (...)
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  17. Philosophy of Nonsense: The Intuitions of Victorian Nonsense Literature.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2016 - Routledge.
    _'Jean-Jacques Lecercle's remarkable _Philosophy of Nonsense___ offers a sustained and important account of an area that is usually hastily dismissed. Using the resources of contemporary philosophy - notably Deleuze and Lyotard - he manages to bring out the importance of nonsense'_ - _Andrew Benjamin, University of Warwick_ Why are we, and in particular why are philosophers and linguists, so fascinated with nonsense? Why do Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear appear in so many otherwise dull and dry academic books? This amusing, (...)
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  18. Philosophy Through the Looking-Glass: Language, Nonsense, Desire.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2016 - Routledge.
    It is generally accepted that language is primarily a means of communication. But do we always mean what we say – must we mean something when we talk? This book explores the other side of language, where words are incoherent and meaning fails us. it argues that this shadey side of language is more important in our everyday speech than linguists and philosophers recognize. Historically this other side of language known as has attracted more attention in France than elsewhere. It (...)
     
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  19. Routledge Revivals: The Violence of Language.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2016 - Routledge.
    First published in 1990, this book argues that any theory of language constructs its ‘object’ by separating ‘relevant’ from ‘irrelevant’ phenomena — excluding the latter. This leaves a ‘remainder’ which consists of the untidy, creative part of how language is used — the essence of poetry and metaphor. Although this remainder can never be completely formalised, it must be fully recognised by any true account of language and thus this book attempts the first ‘theory of the remainder’. As such, whether (...)
     
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  20. The Force of Language.Jean-Jacques Lecercle - 2004 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This text illustrates how the philosophy of Language, if differently conceived, can directly incorporate questions of political thought and of emotionality, and offers the practical case of defensive strategies against abusive speech. This follows a broad consideration of the inner voice or inner speech as a test case for a new approach to language, in particular as a way of radically rethinking the usual contrast between inner and outer through furnishing an account of how we internalize speech. The book's core (...)
     
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