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Jeff Spinner-Halev
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  1.  34
    Enduring Injustice.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Radical injustice; 2. Which injustices? What groups?; 3. Enduring injustice; 4. Apology and acknowledgement; 5. Legitimacy and the cast of history; 6. Elusive justice; 7. A chastened liberalism.
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  2.  3
    Minorities Within Minorities: Equality, Rights and Diversity.Avigail Eisenberg & Jeff Spinner-Halev (eds.) - 2005 - cambridge university press.
    Groups around the world are increasingly successful in maintaining or winning autonomy. However, what happens to individuals within the groups who find that their group discriminates against them? This volume brings together sixteen distinguished scholars who examine the balance between group autonomy and individual rights in relation to conflicts involving gender, religion, culture, and indigenous rights in the national and international sphere.
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  3. From Historical to Enduring Injustice.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (5):574-597.
    Advocates of remedying historical injustices urge political communities to take responsibility for their past, but their arguments are ambiguous about whether all past injustices need remedy, or just those regarding groups that suffer from current injustice. This ambiguity leaves unanswered the challenge of critics who argue that contemporary injustices matter, not those in the past. I argue instead for a focus on injustices that have roots in the past, and continue to the present day, what I call enduring injustice. Instead (...)
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  4.  87
    Hinduism, Christianity, and Liberal Religious Toleration.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2005 - Political Theory 33 (1):28-57.
    The Protestant conception of religion as a private matter of conscience organized into voluntary associations informed early liberalism's conception of religion and of religious toleration, assumptions that are still present in contemporary liberalism. In many other religions, however, including Hinduism (the main though not only focus of this article), practice has a much larger role than conscience. Hinduism is not a voluntary association, and the structure of its practices, some of which are inegalitarian, makes exit very difficult. This makes liberal (...)
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  5. A Restrained View of Transformation.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (6):777-784.
  6.  5
    Group Agency and the Challenges of Repairing Historical Injustice.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2022 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (3):380-394.
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  7.  25
    Land, Culture and Justice: A Framework for Group Rights and Recognition.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2000 - Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (3):319–342.
  8.  24
    Historical Injustice.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2012 - In David Estlund (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. pp. 319.
  9. William Galston, Liberal Pluralism: The Implications of Value Pluralism for Political Theory and Practice Reviewed By.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (2):105-107.
     
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  10.  11
    The Limits of Liberal Integrity.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):635-641.
  11.  27
    The Moral Demands of Memory.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2009 - Social Theory and Practice 35 (3):497-502.
  12.  9
    Liberalism and Religion: Against Congruence.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2008 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 9 (2):553-572.
    I argue here against recent trends in liberal and feminist theory contending that the state should insist that religious groups internalize liberal justice and equality. Doing so dangerously ascribes too much power to the state, and threatens liberty and stability. I argue instead that the liberal state must balance different values. I begin by claiming that while Rawls worries that religious people want to impose their way of life on others, a more accurate concern is that of liberalism imposing its (...)
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  13.  19
    Liberalism, Pluralism, and Religion.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2012 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 25 (2):369-390.
  14.  29
    Difference and Diversity in an Egalitarian Democracy.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 1995 - Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (3):259–279.
  15.  12
    The Universal Pretensions of Cultural Rights Arguments.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (2):1-25.
    Many of the most popular liberal arguments for cultural rights all note that the world is formed into groups. But in the attempt to universalise these arguments, it is too often assumed that the nation is the most important of these groups. This focus upon the nation ignores the many and varying bases of self?respect. It overlooks the fact that self?respect may be tied to many different kinds of groups. Further, most discussions of cultural rights are fuelled by the experience (...)
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  16.  5
    Teaching Identity and Autonomy.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):141-147.
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  17.  10
    Teaching Identity and Autonomy.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):141–147.
  18.  1
    Conflict Among Peoples and Common Moral Ground.Burke A. Hendrix & Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (5):550-597.
    Defenders of Aboriginal rights such as James Tully have argued that members of majority populations should allow Aboriginal peoples to argue within their own preferred intellectual frameworks in seeking common moral ground. But how should non-Aboriginal academics react to claims that seem insufficiently critical or even incoherent? This essay argues that there are two reasons to be especially wary of attacking such errors given the historical injustices perpetrated by settler states against Aboriginal peoples. First, attempts to root out error will (...)
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