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  1.  22
    Holes in the Case for Mixed Emotions.Jeff T. Larsen - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (2):118-123.
    Theories of the structure of affect make competing predictions about whether people can feel happy and sad at the same time. Considerable evidence that happiness and sadness can co-occur has accumulated in the past 15 years, but holes in the case remain. I describe those holes and suggest strategies for testing them in future research. I also explore the possibility that the case may never be closed, in part because the competing hypotheses may not be entirely falsifiable. Fortunately, hypotheses need (...)
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  2.  47
    The Evaluative Space Grid: A Single-Item Measure of Positivity and Negativity.Jeff T. Larsen, Catherine J. Norris, A. Peter McGraw, Louise C. Hawkley & John T. Cacioppo - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (3):453-480.
  3.  23
    Evidence for Mixed Feelings of Happiness and Sadness From Brief Moments in Time.Jeff T. Larsen & Jennifer D. Green - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1469-1477.
  4.  44
    Current Emotion Research in Psychophysiology: The Neurobiology of Evaluative Bivalence.Greg J. Norman, Catherine J. Norris, Jackie Gollan, Tiffany A. Ito, Louise C. Hawkley, Jeff T. Larsen, John T. Cacioppo & Gary G. Berntson - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):349-359.
    Evaluative processes have their roots in early evolutionary history, as survival is dependent on an organism’s ability to identify and respond appropriately to positive, rewarding or otherwise salubrious stimuli as well as to negative, noxious, or injurious stimuli. Consequently, evaluative processes are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom and are represented at multiple levels of the nervous system, including the lowest levels of the neuraxis. While evolution has sculpted higher level evaluative systems into complex and sophisticated information-processing networks, they do not (...)
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  5.  11
    Comment: Homing in on a Balanced Psychology.Jeff T. Larsen - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (1):61-63.
    Hernandez et al.’s review provides clear evidence that positive affect can contribute to well-being and fits nicely within the positive psychology framework. The emergence of positive psychology has been valuable for understanding well-being, but I suggest that a balanced psychology can prove even more valuable in the years to come. A balanced psychology requires giving as much attention to negative emotion as to positive emotion. It also requires considering whether there are circumstances in which positive emotions can be detrimental and (...)
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  6.  25
    Introduction to the Special Section on Mixed Emotions.Jeff T. Larsen - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (2):97-98.
    Theories of the structure of affect make competing predictions about whether people can feel happy and sad at the same time. Considerable evidence that happiness and sadness can co-occur has accumulated in the past 15 years, but holes in the case remain. I describe those holes and suggest strategies for testing them in future research. I also explore the possibility that the case may never be closed, in part because the competing hypotheses may not be entirely falsifiable. Fortunately, hypotheses need (...)
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  7.  20
    Does Blocking Facial Feedback Via Botulinum Toxin Injections Decrease Depression? A Critical Review and Meta-Analysis.Nicholas A. Coles, Jeff T. Larsen, Joyce Kuribayashi & Ashley Kuelz - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (4):294-309.
    Researchers have proposed that blocking facial feedback via glabellar-region botulinum toxin injections can reduce depression. Random-effects meta-analyses of studies that administered GBTX...
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