11 found
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  1.  17
    What Farmers Don't Know Can't Help Them: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Indigenous Technical Knowledge in Honduras. [REVIEW]Jeffery W. Bentley - 1989 - Agriculture and Human Values 6 (3):25-31.
    Traditional Central American peasant farmers know more about some aspects of the local agroecosystem than about others. In general farmers know more about plants, less about insects, and less still about plant pathology. Without discounting economic factors, ease of observability must explain part of this difference. Certain local beliefs may affect what farmers observe and know. For example, a belief in spontaneous generation may lead people to fail to observe insect reproduction. The implications of the gaps in farmer knowledge are (...)
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  2.  18
    Facts, Fantasies, and Failures of Farmer Participatory Research.Jeffery W. Bentley - 1994 - Agriculture and Human Values 11 (2-3):140-150.
    Farmer participatory research (FPR) has generated many programmatic statements and few technologies. FPR has probably been of interest more because of dissatisfaction with the green revolution and agricultural establishment research than because of a proven ability of scientists and farmers to collaborate together. There are several barriers between farmers and scientists, not the least of which is social distance. The role of FPR should be critically examined; it may work best setting research agendas or in the case of researchers who (...)
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  3.  30
    Science and People: Honduran Campesinos and Natural Pest Control Inventions. [REVIEW]Jeffery W. Bentley, Gonzalo Rodríguez & Ana González - 1994 - Agriculture and Human Values 11 (2-3):178-182.
    Farmers are experts on their natural environment and are innate experimenters. However they do not know everything. Filling in gaps of missing farmer knowledge can help them improve their experiments. The authors designed and taught a course to Honduran farmers that effectively covered a number of key points on insect ecology and biology that farmers had not understood. After receiving the course many farmers did experiments to solve pest problems without synthetic pesticides.
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  4.  71
    Bibliography: Farmer Knowledge and Management of Crop Disease. [REVIEW]Jeffery W. Bentley & Graham Thiele - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (1):75-81.
    Nearly all contemporary people subsist on cultivated plants, most of which are vulnerable to diseases. Yet, there have been few studies of what traditional people know – and do not know – about crop disease. Agricultural scientists in general are becoming aware of the potential contribution of social scientists and farmers in developing integrated management of crop diseases. The International Potato Center (CIP) has focused on stimulating farmer-scientist collaboration in developing management of late blight, a major fungal disease of potatoes (...)
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  5.  50
    Folk Experiments.Jeffery W. Bentley - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):451-462.
    Folk experiments in agriculture are often inspired by new ideas blended with old ones, motivated by economic and environmental change. They tend to save labor or capital. These notions are illustrated with nine short case studies from Nicaragua and El Salvador. The new ideas that catalyze folk experiments may be provided by development agencies, but paradoxically, the folk experiments are so common that the agencies that inspire them usually pay little attention to them. Some folk experiments are original, but others (...)
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  6.  68
    Liberalization of Peru's Formal Seed Sector.Jeffery W. Bentley, Robert Tripp & Roberto Delgado de la Flor - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):319-331.
    During the 1990s, the Government of Peru began to aggressivelyprivatize agriculture. The government stopped loaning money to farmers' cooperatives and closed the government rice-buying company. The government even rented out most of its researchstations and many senior scientists lost their jobs. As part of this trend, the government eliminated its seed certification agency. Instead, private seed certification committees were set up with USAID funding and technical advise from a US university. The committees were supposed to become self-financing (bycertifying seed grown (...)
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  7.  14
    Brooke Larson, Cochabamba, 1550-1900: Colonialism and Agrarian Transformation in Bolivia. [REVIEW]Jeffery W. Bentley - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (1):83-84.
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  8.  16
    Genetically Modified Pest-Protected Plants: Science and Regulation. By National Research Council 2000. [REVIEW]Jeffery W. Bentley - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (3):327-330.
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  9.  16
    Jeffery M. Paige, Coffee and Power: Revolution and the Rise of Democracy in Central America. [REVIEW]Jeffery W. Bentley - 1999 - Agriculture and Human Values 16 (1):85-86.
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  10.  43
    Local Knowledge and Agricultural Decision Making in the Philippines: Class, Gender and Resistance by Virginia D. Nazarea-Sandoval. [REVIEW]Jeffery W. Bentley - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (4):387-387.
  11.  23
    On the Ethics of Biological Control of Insect Pests.Jeffery W. Bentley & Robert J. O'Neil - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):283-289.
    Of the four types of biological control, (1) natural, (2) conservation, (3) augmentation, and (4) importation), ethical concerns have been raised almost exclusively about only one type: importation. These concerns rest largely on fears of extinction of animal species. Importation biological control is a cost-effective alternative to chemical control for basic food crops of resource-poor farmers. Regarding the other types of biological control, natural biological control is not consciously manipulated by humans. Augmentation has some technical concerns, but is generally an (...)
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