Results for 'Jeffrey A. Herron'

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  1.  65
    Artifact characterization and mitigation techniques during concurrent sensing and stimulation using bidirectional deep brain stimulation platforms.Michaela E. Alarie, Nicole R. Provenza, Michelle Avendano-Ortega, Sarah A. McKay, Ayan S. Waite, Raissa K. Mathura, Jeffrey A. Herron, Sameer A. Sheth, David A. Borton & Wayne K. Goodman - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16:1016379.
    Bidirectional deep brain stimulation (DBS) platforms have enabled a surge in hours of recordings in naturalistic environments, allowing further insight into neurological and psychiatric disease states. However, high amplitude, high frequency stimulation generates artifacts that contaminate neural signals and hinder our ability to interpret the data. This is especially true in psychiatric disorders, for which high amplitude stimulation is commonly applied to deep brain structures where the native neural activity is miniscule in comparison. Here, we characterized artifact sources in recordings (...)
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  2.  13
    Intraoperative Characterization of Subthalamic Nucleus-to-Cortex Evoked Potentials in Parkinson’s Disease Deep Brain Stimulation.Lila H. Levinson, David J. Caldwell, Jeneva A. Cronin, Brady Houston, Steve I. Perlmutter, Kurt E. Weaver, Jeffrey A. Herron, Jeffrey G. Ojemann & Andrew L. Ko - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is a clinically effective tool for treating medically refractory Parkinson’s disease, but its neural mechanisms remain debated. Previous work has demonstrated that STN DBS results in evoked potentials in the primary motor cortex, suggesting that modulation of cortical physiology may be involved in its therapeutic effects. Due to technical challenges presented by high-amplitude DBS artifacts, these EPs are often measured in response to low-frequency stimulation, which is generally ineffective at PD symptom management. This (...)
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  3.  12
    A Pilot Study on Data-Driven Adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation in Chronically Implanted Essential Tremor Patients.Sebastián Castaño-Candamil, Benjamin I. Ferleger, Andrew Haddock, Sarah S. Cooper, Jeffrey Herron, Andrew Ko, Howard J. Chizeck & Michael Tangermann - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
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  4.  18
    Consciousness, schizophrenia and scientific theory.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1993 - In Gregory R. Bock & Joan Marsh (eds.), Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness (CIBA Foundation Symposia Series, No. 174). Wiley. pp. 174--263.
  5.  40
    Levels of Altruism.Martin Zwick & Jeffrey A. Fletcher - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (1):100-107.
    The phenomenon of altruism extends from the biological realm to the human sociocultural realm. This article sketches a coherent outline of multiple types of altruism of progressively increasing scope that span these two realms and are grounded in an ever-expanding sense of “self.” Discussion of this framework notes difficulties associated with altruism at different levels. It links scientific ideas about the evolution of cooperation and about hierarchical order to perennial philosophical and religious concerns. It offers a conceptual background for inquiry (...)
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  6.  65
    Creeping up on the hard question of consciousness.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1998 - In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & Alwyn Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II: The Second Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press.
  7. Creeping up on the hard question of consciousness.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1998 - In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & Alwyn Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II: The Second Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press.
  8. Using cognitive interviewing to explore elementary and secondary school students' epistemic and ontological cognition.Jeffrey A. Greene [ - 2010 - In Lisa D. Bendixen & Florian C. Feucht (eds.), Personal epistemology in the classroom: theory, research, and implications for practice. New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  9. Précis of The neuropsychology of anxiety: An enquiry into the functions of the septo-hippocampal system.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):469-484.
    A model of the neuropsychology of anxiety is proposed. The model is based in the first instance upon an analysis of the behavioural effects of the antianxiety drugs in animals. From such psychopharmacologi-cal experiments the concept of a “behavioural inhibition system” has been developed. This system responds to novel stimuli or to those associated with punishment or nonreward by inhibiting ongoing behaviour and increasing arousal and attention to the environment. It is activity in the BIS that constitutes anxiety and that (...)
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  10.  29
    Sodium amobarbital, the hippocampal theta rhythm, and the partial reinforcement extinction effect.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1970 - Psychological Review 77 (5):465-480.
  11.  31
    Philosophy at the Edge of Chaos: Gilles Deleuze and the Philosophy of Difference.Jeffrey A. Bell - 2006 - University of Toronto Press.
    From the early 1960s until his death, French philosopher Gilles Deleuze wrote many influential works on philosophy, literature, film, and fine art. One of Deleuze's main philosophical projects was a systematic inversion of the traditional relationship between identity and difference. This Deleuzian philosophy of difference is the subject of Jeffrey A. Bell's Philosophy at the Edge of Chaos. Bell argues that Deleuze's efforts to develop a philosophy of difference are best understood by exploring both Deleuze's claim to be a (...)
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  12.  12
    An Inquiry into Analytic-Continental Metaphysics: Truth, Relevance and Metaphysics.Jeffrey A. Bell - 2022 - Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    Introduction -- 1. Problem of the New -- 2. Problem of Relations -- 3. Problem of Emergence -- 4. Problem of One and Many -- 5. Plato and the Third Man Argument -- 6. Bradley and the Problem of Relations -- 7. Moore, Russell and the Birth of Analytic Philosophy -- 8. Russell and Deleuze on Leibniz -- 9. On Problematic Fields -- 10. Kant and Problematic Ideas -- 11. Armstrong and Lewis on the Problem of One and Many -- (...)
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  13.  13
    Deleuze and Guattari's What is Philosophy?: A Critical Introduction and Guide.Jeffrey A. Bell - 2016 - Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1.What is a Concept? -- 2.Why Philosophy? -- 3.How to Become a Philosopher -- 4.Putting Philosophy in its Place -- 5.Philosophy and Science -- 6.Philosophy and Logic -- 7.Philosophy and Art.
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  14. Self-Assembling Networks.Jeffrey A. Barrett, Brian Skyrms & Aydin Mohseni - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (1):1-25.
    We consider how an epistemic network might self-assemble from the ritualization of the individual decisions of simple heterogeneous agents. In such evolved social networks, inquirers may be significantly more successful than they could be investigating nature on their own. The evolved network may also dramatically lower the epistemic risk faced by even the most talented inquirers. We consider networks that self-assemble in the context of both perfect and imperfect communication and compare the behaviour of inquirers in each. This provides a (...)
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  15. The contents of consciousness: A neuropsychological conjecture.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):659-76.
    Drawing on previous models of anxiety, intermediate memory, the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, and goal-directed behaviour, a neuropsychological hypothesis is proposed for the generation of the contents of consciousness. It is suggested that these correspond to the outputs of a comparator that, on a moment-by-moment basis, compares the current state of the organism's perceptual world with a predicted state. An outline is given of the information-processing functions of the comparator system and of the neural systems which mediate them. The hypothesis (...)
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  16. The mind-brain identity theory as a scientific hypothesis.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 21 (July):247-254.
  17.  84
    Self-assembling Games.Jeffrey A. Barrett & Brian Skyrms - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (2):329-353.
    We consider how cue-reading, sensory-manipulation, and signaling games may initially evolve from ritualized decisions and how more complex games may evolve from simpler games by polymerization, template transfer, and modular composition. Modular composition is a process that combines simpler games into more complex games. Template transfer, a process by which a game is appropriated to a context other than the one in which it initially evolved, is one mechanism for modular composition. And polymerization is a particularly salient example of modular (...)
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  18. Dynamic partitioning and the conventionality of kinds.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (4):527-546.
    Lewis sender‐receiver games illustrate how a meaningful term language might evolve from initially meaningless random signals (Lewis 1969; Skyrms 2006). Here we consider how a meaningful language with a primitive grammar might evolve in a somewhat more subtle sort of game. The evolution of such a language involves the co‐evolution of partitions of the physical world into what may seem, at least from the perspective of someone using the language, to correspond to canonical natural kinds. While the evolved language may (...)
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  19.  29
    Don't leave the “psych” out of neuropsychology.Jeffrey A. Gray & Ilan Baruch - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):215-217.
  20. Brain Systems that Mediate both Emotion and Cognition.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1990 - Cognition and Emotion 4 (3):269-288.
  21.  11
    Adolescent sexting: ethical and legal implications for psychologists.Jeffrey A. Rings & Callie K. King - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (6):469-479.
    ABSTRACT Sexting has become a prominent part of adolescent culture. Under current laws, adolescents caught sexting are being arrested, facing child pornography charges, and having to register as sex offenders. State laws on child pornography and child abuse differ throughout the United States and conflict with federal laws, making the ethical obligations for psychologists unclear. The purpose of this article is to promote awareness about legal obligations regarding adolescent sexting, address the ethical dilemma that psychologists face when adolescent sexting is (...)
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  22. Algebraic symbolism in medieval Arabic algebra.Jeffrey A. Oaks - 2012 - Philosophica 87 (4):27-83.
  23.  48
    Spatial mapping only a special case of hippocampal function.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):501-503.
  24.  66
    Self-Assembling Games.Jeffrey A. Barrett & Brian Skyrms - unknown
    We consider how cue-reading, sensory-manipulation, and signaling games may initially evolve from ritualized decisions and how more complex games may evolve from simpler games by polymerization, template transfer, and modular composition. Modular composition is a process that combines simpler games into more complex games. Template transfer, a process by which a game is appropriated to a context other than the one in which it initially evolved, is one mechanism for modular composition. And polymerization is a particularly salient example of modular (...)
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  25.  21
    Seeing Trees: Investigating Poetics of Place‐Based, Aesthetic Environmental Education with Heidegger and Wittgenstein.Jeffrey A. Stickney - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (5):1278-1305.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 54, Issue 5, Page 1278-1305, October 2020.
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  26. The Evolution of Coding in Signaling Games.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2009 - Theory and Decision 67 (2):223-237.
    Signaling games with reinforcement learning have been used to model the evolution of term languages (Lewis 1969, Convention. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press; Skyrms 2006, “Signals” Presidential Address. Philosophy of Science Association for PSA). In this article, syntactic games, extensions of David Lewis’s original sender–receiver game, are used to illustrate how a language that exploits available syntactic structure might evolve to code for states of the world. The evolution of a language occurs in the context of available vocabulary and syntax—the (...)
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  27. Numerical simulations of the Lewis signaling game: Learning strategies, pooling equilibria, and the evolution of grammar.Jeffrey A. Barrett - unknown
    David Lewis (1969) introduced sender-receiver games as a way of investigating how meaningful language might evolve from initially random signals. In this report I investigate the conditions under which Lewis signaling games evolve to perfect signaling systems under various learning dynamics. While the 2-state/2- term Lewis signaling game with basic urn learning always approaches a signaling system, I will show that with more than two states suboptimal pooling equilibria can evolve. Inhomogeneous state distributions increase the likelihood of pooling equilibria, but (...)
     
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  28. Everett’s pure wave mechanics and the notion of worlds.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (2):277-302.
    Everett (1957a, b, 1973) relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics has often been taken to involve a metaphysical commitment to the existence of many splitting worlds each containing physical copies of observers and the objects they observe. While there was earlier talk of splitting worlds in connection with Everett, this is largely due to DeWitt’s (Phys Today 23:30–35, 1970) popular presentation of the theory. While the thought of splitting worlds or parallel universes has captured the popular imagination, Everett himself favored the (...)
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  29.  54
    On the classification of the emotions.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):431-432.
  30.  25
    Is there any need for conditioning in Eysenck's conditioning model of neurosis?Jeffrey A. Gray - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):169-171.
  31.  27
    On the difference between pain and fear.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):310-310.
  32.  40
    Typical worlds.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 58:31-40.
  33.  44
    Self-Assembling Games and the Evolution of Salience.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2023 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 74 (1):75-89.
    This article considers how a generalized signalling game may self-assemble as the saliences of the agents evolve by reinforcement on those sources of information that in fact lead to successful action. On the present account, generalized signalling games self-assemble even as the agents co-evolve meaningful representations and successful dispositions for using those representations. We will see how reinforcement on successful information sources also provides a mechanism whereby simpler games might compose to form more complex games. Along the way, I consider (...)
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  34.  32
    Entanglement and disentanglement in relativistic quantum mechanics.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 48 (2):168-174.
  35. Empirical adequacy and the availability of reliable records in quantum mechanics.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (1):49-64.
    In order to judge whether a theory is empirically adequate one must have epistemic access to reliable records of past measurement results that can be compared against the predictions of the theory. Some formulations of quantum mechanics fail to satisfy this condition. The standard theory without the collapse postulate is an example. Bell's reading of Everett's relative-state formulation is another. Furthermore, there are formulations of quantum mechanics that only satisfy this condition for a special class of observers, formulations whose empirical (...)
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  36.  7
    Polynomials and equations in arabic algebra.Jeffrey A. Oaks - 2009 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 63 (2):169-203.
    It is shown in this article that the two sides of an equation in the medieval Arabic algebra are aggregations of the algebraic “numbers” (powers) with no operations present. Unlike an expression such as our 3x + 4, the Arabic polynomial “three things and four dirhams” is merely a collection of seven objects of two different types. Ideally, the two sides of an equation were polynomials so the Arabic algebraists preferred to work out all operations of the enunciation to a (...)
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  37.  18
    The Problem of Difference: Phenomenology and Poststructuralism.Jeffrey A. Bell (ed.) - 1998 - University of Toronto Press.
    Jeffrey A. Bell here presents a finely constructed survey of the contemporary continental philosophers, focusing on how they have dealt with the problem of difference.
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  38.  14
    Proletarian hominids on the rampage.Jeffrey A. Kurland - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):202-203.
  39.  32
    On the Evolution of Compositional Language.Jeffrey A. Barrett, Calvin Cochran & Brian Skyrms - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (5):910-920.
    We present here a hierarchical model for the evolution of compositional language. The model has the structure of a two-sender/one-receiver Lewis signaling game augmented with executive agents who m...
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  40. On the Faithful Interpretation of Pure Wave Mechanics.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (4):693-709.
    Given Hugh Everett III's understanding of the proper cognitive status of physical theories, his relative-state formulation of pure wave mechanics arguably qualifies as an empirically acceptable physical theory. The argument turns on the precise nature of the relationship that Everett requires between the empirical substructure of an empirically faithful physical theory and experience. On this view, Everett provides a weak resolution to both the determinate record and the probability problems encountered by pure wave mechanics, and does so in a way (...)
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  41.  23
    On the Coevolution of Theory and Language and the Nature of Successful Inquiry.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (Suppl 4):821-834.
    Insofar as empirical inquiry involves the coevolution of descriptive language and theoretical commitments, a satisfactory model of empirical knowledge should describe the coordinated evolution of both language and theory. But since we do not know what conceptual resources we might need to express our future theories or to provide our best future faithful descriptions of the world, we do not now know even what the space of future descriptive options might be. One strategy for addressing this shifting-resource problem is to (...)
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  42. Algorithmic Randomness and Probabilistic Laws.Jeffrey A. Barrett & Eddy Keming Chen - manuscript
    We consider two ways one might use algorithmic randomness to characterize a probabilistic law. The first is a generative chance* law. Such laws involve a nonstandard notion of chance. The second is a probabilistic* constraining law. Such laws impose relative frequency and randomness constraints that every physically possible world must satisfy. While each notion has virtues, we argue that the latter has advantages over the former. It supports a unified governing account of non-Humean laws and provides independently motivated solutions to (...)
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  43.  57
    On the Coevolution of Theory and Language and the Nature of Successful Inquiry.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S4):1-14.
    Insofar as empirical inquiry involves the coevolution of descriptive language and theoretical commitments, a satisfactory model of empirical knowledge should describe the coordinated evolution of both language and theory. But since we do not know what conceptual resources we might need to express our future theories or to provide our best future faithful descriptions of the world, we do not now know even what the space of future descriptive options might be. One strategy for addressing this shifting-resource problem is to (...)
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  44.  59
    Medieval Arabic Algebra as an Artificial Language.Jeffrey A. Oaks - 2007 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (5-6):543-575.
    Medieval Arabic algebra is a good example of an artificial language.Yet despite its abstract, formal structure, its utility was restricted to problem solving. Geometry was the branch of mathematics used for expressing theories. While algebra was an art concerned with finding specific unknown numbers, geometry dealtwith generalmagnitudes.Algebra did possess the generosity needed to raise it to a more theoretical level—in the ninth century Abū Kāmil reinterpreted the algebraic unknown “thing” to prove a general result. But mathematicians had no motive to (...)
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  45.  11
    Class and Feminine Excess: The Strange Case of Anna Nicole Smith.Jeffrey A. Brown - 2005 - Feminist Review 81 (1):74-94.
    Cultural concerns about race, class and beauty often intersect with mass-mediated depictions of the female body. Drawing on Foucault's theories about disciplining the public body, this article examines the changing public perception of Anna Nicole Smith from an ideal beauty to a white trash stereotype. This analysis argues that Smith's very public weight gains, her outrageous behaviour and her legal battle for her late husband's fortune is presented in the media as an example of inappropriate conduct for a white beauty (...)
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  46.  32
    Not to harm a fly: our ethical obligations to insects.Jeffrey A. Lockwood - 1988 - Between the Species 4 (3):12.
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  47.  88
    The persistence of memory: Surreal trajectories in Bohm's theory.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (4):680-703.
    In this paper I describe the history of the surreal trajectories problem and argue that in fact it is not a problem for Bohm's theory. More specifically, I argue that one can take the particle trajectories predicted by Bohm's theory to be the actual trajectories that particles follow and that there is no reason to suppose that good particle detectors are somehow fooled in the context of the surreal trajectories experiments. Rather than showing that Bohm's theory predicts the wrong particle (...)
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  48.  85
    Schiller’s Critique of Kant’s Moral Psychology.Jeffrey A. Gauthier - 1997 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):513-543.
    Mention of the name of Friedrich Schiller among both critics and defenders of Kant's moral philosophy has most often been with reference to the well known quip:“Gladly I serve my friends, but alas I do it with pleasure.Hence I am plagued with doubt that I am not a virtuous person.““Sure, your only resource is to try to despise them entirely,And then with aversion to do what your duty enjoins you.''This attention, however, has served to obscure the fact that Schiller truly (...)
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  49. A Quantum-Mechanical Argument for Mind–Body Dualism.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2006 - Erkenntnis 65 (1):97-115.
    I argue that a strong mind–body dualism is required of any formulation of quantum mechanics that satisfies a relatively weak set of explanatory constraints. Dropping one or more of these constraints may allow one to avoid the commitment to a mind–body dualism but may also require a commitment to a physical–physical dualism that is at least as objectionable. Ultimately, it is the preferred basis problem that pushes both collapse and no-collapse theories in the direction of a strong dualism in resolving (...)
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  50. Are our best physical theories (probably and/or approximately) true?Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1206-1218.
    There is good reason to suppose that our best physical theories are false: In addition to its own internal problems, the standard formulation of quantum mechanics is logically incompatible with special relativity. I will also argue that we have no concrete idea what it means to claim that these theories are approximately true.
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