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Jeffrey P. Bishop [28]Jeffrey Paul Bishop [1]
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Jeffrey Bishop
Saint Louis University
  1. The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying.Jeffrey Paul Bishop - 2011 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    In this original and compelling book, Jeffrey P. Bishop, a philosopher, ethicist, and physician, argues that something has gone sadly amiss in the care of the dying by contemporary medicine and in our social and political views of death, as shaped by our scientific successes and ongoing debates about euthanasia and the "right to die"--or to live. __The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying__, informed by Foucault's genealogy of medicine and power as well as by a (...)
     
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  2.  86
    Bioethics as Biopolitics.Jeffrey P. Bishop & Fabrice Jotterand - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (3):205 – 212.
  3.  54
    Of Goals and Goods and Floundering About: A Dissensus Report on Clinical Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW]Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2009 - HEC Forum 21 (3):275-291.
    Of Goals and Goods and Floundering About: A Dissensus Report on Clinical Ethics Consultation Content Type Journal Article Pages 275-291 DOI 10.1007/s10730-009-9101-1 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 400 Nashville Tennessee 37203 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Avenue, Suite 400 Nashville Tennessee 37203 USA Mark J. Bliton, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Avenue, Suite (...)
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  4.  44
    Rejecting Medical Humanism: Medical Humanities and the Metaphysics of Medicine. [REVIEW]Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):15-25.
    The call for a narrative medicine has been touted as the cure-all for an increasingly mechanical medicine. It has been claimed that the humanities might create more empathic, reflective, professional and trustworthy doctors. In other words, we can once again humanise medicine through the addition of humanities. In this essay, I explore how the humanities, particularly narrative medicine, appeals to the metaphysical commitments of the medical institution in order to find its justification, and in so doing, perpetuates a dualism of (...)
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  5. Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? [REVIEW]Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):171-171.
    Erratum to: Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? Content Type Journal Article Pages 171-171 DOI 10.1007/s10730-010-9132-7 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Saint Louis University Tenet Chair of Health Care Ethics, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics Salus Center, Room 527, 3545 Lafayette Ave St. Louis MO 63104-1314 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Ave., 4th Floor, Suite 400 Nashville TN 37203 USA Mark J. Bliton, Vanderbilt University (...)
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  6.  2
    Secular Dreams and Myths of Irreligion: On the Political Control of Religion in Public Bioethics.Boaz W. Goss & Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (2):219-237.
    Full-Blooded religion is not acceptable in mainstream bioethics. This article excavates the cultural history that led to the suppression of religion in bioethics. Bioethicists typically fall into one of the following camps. 1) The irreligious, who advocate for suppressing religion, as do Timothy F. Murphy, Sam Harris, and Richard Dawkins. This irreligious camp assumes American Fundamentalist Protestantism is the real substance of all religions. 2) Religious bioethicists, who defend religion by emphasizing its functions and diminishing its metaphysical commitments. Religious defenders (...)
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  7.  27
    Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation?Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):73-84.
    Guiding our response in this essay is our view that current efforts to demarcate the role of the clinical ethicist risk reducing its complex network of authorizations to sites of power and payment. In turn, the role becomes susceptible to various ideologies—individualisms, proceduralisms, secularisms—that further divide the body from the web of significances that matter to that body, where only she, the patient, is located. The security of policy, standards, and employment will pull against and eventually sever the authorization secured (...)
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  8.  8
    When is Somebody Just Some Body? Ethics as First Philosophy and the Brain Death Debate.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):419-436.
    I, along with others, have been critical of the social construction of brain death and the various social factors that led to redefining death from cardiopulmonary failure to irreversible loss of brain functioning, or brain death. Yet this does not mean that brain death is not the best threshold to permit organ harvesting—or, as people today prefer to call it, organ procurement. Here I defend whole-brain death as a morally legitimate line that, once crossed, is grounds for families to give (...)
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  9.  13
    Ageing and the Technological Imaginary: Living and Dying in the Age of Perpetual Innovation.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (1):20-35.
    Technology tends toward perpetual innovation. Technology, enabled by both political and economic structures, propels society forward in a kind of technological evolution. The moment a novel piece of technology is in place, immediately innovations are attempted in a process of unending betterment. Bernard Stiegler suggests that, contra Heidegger, it is not being-toward-death that shapes human perception of time, life, death, and meaning. Rather, it is technological innovation that shapes human perception of time, life, death, and meaning. In fact, for Stiegler, (...)
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  10.  1
    Technics and Liturgics.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2020 - Christian Bioethics 26 (1):12-30.
    It is commonly held that Christian ethics generally and Christian bioethics particularly is the application of Christian moral systems to novel problems engaged by contemporary culture and created by contemporary technology. On this view, Christianity adds its moral vision to a technology, baptizing it for use. In this essay, I show that modern technology is a metaphysical moral worldview that enacts its own moral vision, shaping a moral imaginary, shaping our moral perception, creating moral subjects, and shaping what we imagine (...)
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  11.  17
    Of Minds and Brains and Cocreation: Psychopharmaceuticals and Modern Technological Imaginaries.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2018 - Christian Bioethics 24 (3):224-245.
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  12.  30
    Fides Ancilla Medicinae: On the Ersatz Liturgy of Death in Biopsychosociospiritual Medicine.Jeffrey P. Bishop, Philipp W. Rosemann & Frederick W. Schmidt - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (1):20-43.
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  13. Bioethical Pluralism and Complementarity.Frederick Grinnell, Jeffrey P. Bishop & Laurence B. McCullough - 2002 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (3):338-349.
    This essay presents complementarity as a novel feature of bioethical pluralism. First introduced by Neils Bohr in conjunction with quantum physics, complementarity in bioethics occurs when different perspectives account for equally important features of a situation but are mutually exclusive. Unlike conventional approaches to bioethical pluralism, which attempt in one fashion or another to isolate and choose between different perspectives, complementarity accepts all perspectives. As a result, complementarity results in a state of holistic, dynamic tension, rather than one that yields (...)
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  14.  17
    Beginning at the End: Liturgy and the Care of the Dying.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2017 - Christian Bioethics 23 (1):77-83.
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  15.  14
    Of Idolatries and Ersatz Liturgies: The False Gods of Spiritual Assessment.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (3):332-347.
  16.  15
    Efficient, Compassionate, and Fractured:Contemporary Care in the ICU.Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joshua E. Perry & Amanda Hine - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (4):35-43.
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  17.  63
    Modern Liberalism, Female Circumcision, and the Rationality of Traditions.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):473 – 497.
    Tolerance is at the heart of Western liberalism, permitting mutually exclusive ideas and practices to coexist peacefully with one another, without the proponents of the differing ideas and practices killing one another. Yet, nothing challenges tolerance like the practice of sunna, female circumcision, clitorectomy, or genital mutilation. In this essay, I critique the Western critics of the practices, not in order to defend these practices, but rather to show that Western liberalism itself does not offer transcultural and transtemporal principles, for (...)
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  18.  22
    Beyond Health Care Accountability: The Gift of Medicine.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):119 – 133.
    E. Haavi Morreim's book, Holding Health Care Accountable , insightfully describes several features of the current crisis in malpractice in relation to the health care marketplace. In this essay, I delineate the key and eminently practical guide for reform that she lays out. I argue that her insights bring us to more fundamental aspects than immanent medical economy and accountability - aspects that are ignored at present. I describe the features of immanent economy and how they tend to cover over (...)
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  19.  18
    Arts of Dying and the Statecraft of Killing.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2016 - Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):261-268.
    Those supporting laws permitting assisted suicide seem to enact a thin morality, one that permits people who desire AS to get it in the terminal stages of an illness, and that provide safeguards both for those who desire AS and do not desire it. This article explores the way in which all AS legislation subtly frames the question of AS such that AS becomes the clearest option; ensconcing AS in law also gives a moral legitimacy to suicide. Thus, the morality (...)
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  20.  8
    At the Edge of Everydayness.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2020 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 10 (1):43-48.
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  21.  19
    Assessing the Spirit.Jeffrey P. Bishop & Emily K. Trancik - 2013 - Christian Bioethics 19 (3):247-250.
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  22.  4
    Building Moral Brains.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2020 - Maynooth Philosophical Papers 10:135-149.
    Technology is evolving at a rate faster than human evolution, especially human moral evolution. There are those who claim that we must morally bioenhance the human due to existential threats and due to the fact that the human animal has a weak moral will. To address these existential threats, we must design human morality into human beings technologically. By moral bioenhancement, these authors mean that we must intervene technologically in the biology of the human animal in order to get it (...)
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  23.  19
    Erratum To: Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation?Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (2):171-171.
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  24.  18
    From Anticipatory Corpse to Posthuman God.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (6):679-695.
    The essays in this issue of JMP are devoted to critical engagement of my book, The Anticipatory Corpse. The essays, for the most part, accept the main thrust of my critique of medicine. The main thrust of the criticism is whether the scope of the critique is too totalizing, and whether the proposed remedy is sufficient. I greatly appreciate these interventions because they allow me this occasion to respond and clarify, and to even further extend the argument of my book. (...)
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  25.  77
    Medically Assisted Nutrition and Hydration: The Vegetative State and Beyond: Articles.Jeffrey P. Bishop & Elliott Louis Bedford - 2011 - Christian Bioethics 17 (2):97-104.
  26. Mind-Body Unity: Gregory of Nyssa and a Surprising Fourth-Century CE Perspective.Jeffrey P. Bishop - 2000 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (4):519-529.
  27.  18
    Norming COVID‐19: The Urgency of a Non‐Humanist Holism.Jeffrey P. Bishop & Martin J. Fitzgerald - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
  28.  70
    The History and Future of Bioethics: A Sociological View. [REVIEW]Jeffrey P. Bishop & Amanda Hine - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):105-107.
  29.  14
    The Moral Imperative to Morally Enhance.Ysabel Johnston, Jeffrey P. Bishop & Griffin Trotter - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (5):485-489.
    What is morality? Is “morality” something that admits of technological enhancement? What could it possibly mean for a society to have a moral imperative to morally enhance? We are compelled to take up questions like these as we move into the future of moral bioenhancement. Each article in this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy attempts to bring some clarity as to what is meant by morality, such that one could be morally obligated to morally enhance. These articles (...)
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