Results for 'Jeffrey Wisdom'

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  1.  55
    Proper‐Function Moral Realism.Jeffrey Wisdom - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1660-1674.
    A common line of thought in contemporary metaethics is that certain facts about the evolutionary history of humans make moral realism implausible. Two of the most developed evolutionary cases against realism are found in the works of Richard Joyce and Sharon Street. In what follows, I argue that a form of moral realism that I call proper-function moral realism can meet Joyce and Street's challenges. I begin by sketching the basics of proper-function moral realism. I then present what I take (...)
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  2.  13
    What “the Straw Man” Teaches Us, Or, Finding Wisdom Between the Horns of a False Dilemma About Ethics Consultation Methodology.Jeffrey P. Spike - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (1):48-49.
  3.  11
    Runic Wisdom in "Njal's Saga" and Nordic Mythology: Roots of an Oral Legal Tradition in Northern Europe.Jeffrey L. Slusher - 1991 - Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 3 (1):21-39.
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  4.  8
    A Dose of Reality for Moral Twin Earth.Jeffrey Wisdom - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology:1-21.
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  5. Simplicity and Aseity.Jeffrey E. Brower - 2009 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press. pp. 105-28.
    There is a traditional theistic doctrine, known as the doctrine of divine simplicity, according to which God is an absolutely simple being, completely devoid of any metaphysical complexity. On the standard understanding of this doctrine—as epitomized in the work of philosophers such as Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas—there are no distinctions to be drawn between God and his nature, goodness, power, or wisdom. On the contrary, God is identical with each of these things, along with anything else that can be (...)
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  6. Thoughts on Wisdom and Its Relation to Critical Thinking, Multiculturalism, and Global Awareness.Jeremy Barris & Jeffrey C. C. Ruff - 2011 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 31 (1):5-20.
    We want to propose a conception of wisdom with a view to exploring what insights it can give us into some basic dimensions of teaching in contemporary higher education. We hope to show that this conception allows us, on the one hand, to see some crucial inadequacies of existing approaches to critical thinking, multiculturalism, and global awareness or internationalism. On the other hand, we believe that it also gives us some insight into the existentially or spiritually meaningful dimensions of (...)
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  7.  5
    The Future of Religion; Silence and Honey Cakes: The Wisdom of the Desert.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2005 - Common Knowledge 11 (2):354-356.
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  8. Nicholas Maxwell, From Knowledge to Wisdom: A Revolution in the Aims and Methods of Science Reviewed By.Jeffrey Foss - 1986 - Philosophy in Review 6 (5):235-237.
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  9.  61
    Reviving the Conversation Around CPR/DNR.Jeffrey Bishop, Kyle Brothers, Joshua Perry & Ayesha Ahmad - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):61-67.
    This paper examines the historical rise of both cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the do-not-resuscitate order and the wisdom of their continuing status in U.S. hospital practice and policy. The practice of universal presumed consent to CPR and the resulting DNR policy are the products of a particular time and were responses to particular problems. In order to keep the excesses of technology in check, the DNR policies emerged as a response to the in-hospital universal presumed consent to CPR. We live (...)
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  10.  84
    Leibniz's Two Realms Revisited.Jeffrey K. McDonough - 2008 - Noûs 42 (4):673-696.
    Leibniz speaks, in a variety of contexts, of there being two realms—a "kingdom of power or efficient causes" and "a kingdom of wisdom or final causes." This essay explores an often overlooked application of Leibniz's famous "two realms doctrine." The first part turns to Leibniz's work in optics for the roots of his view that nature can be seen as being governed by two complete sets of equipotent laws, with one set corresponding to the efficient causal order of the (...)
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  11. The Preferred-Basis Problem and the Quantum Mechanics of Everything.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2005 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (2):199-220.
    argued that there are two options for what he called a realistic solution to the quantum measurement problem: (1) select a preferred set of observables for which definite values are assumed to exist, or (2) attempt to assign definite values to all observables simultaneously (1810–1). While conventional wisdom has it that the second option is ruled out by the Kochen-Specker theorem, Vink nevertheless advocated it. Making every physical quantity determinate in quantum mechanics carries with it significant conceptual costs, but (...)
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  12. A Theistic Argument Against Platonism (and in Support of Truthmakers and Divine Simplicity).Michael Bergmann & Jeffrey E. Brower - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 2:357-386.
    Predication is an indisputable part of our linguistic behavior. By contrast, the metaphysics of predication has been a matter of dispute ever since antiquity. According to Plato—or at least Platonism, the view that goes by Plato’s name in contemporary philosophy—the truths expressed by predications such as “Socrates is wise” are true because there is a subject of predication (e.g., Socrates), there is an abstract property or universal (e.g., wisdom), and the subject exemplifies the property.1 This view is supposed to (...)
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  13.  64
    How Aristotelians Can Make Faith a Virtue.Anne Jeffrey - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):393-409.
    Neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics identifies the virtues with the traits the fully virtuous person possesses. Further, it depicts the fully virtuous person as having all the cognitive perfections necessary for possessing practical wisdom. This paper argues that these two theses disqualify faith as trust, as construed on contemporary accounts of faith, as a virtue. For faith’s role as a virtue depends on limitations of its possessor that are incompatible with the psychological profile of the fully virtuous person on the neo-Aristotelian (...)
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  14.  43
    Finite Knowledge/Finite Power: “Death Panels” and the Limits of Medicine.Jeffrey Bishop, Kyle Brothers, Joshua Perry & Ayesha Ahmad - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):7-9.
    This paper examines the historical rise of both cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the do-not-resuscitate order and the wisdom of their continuing status in U.S. hospital practice and policy. The practice of universal presumed consent to CPR and the resulting DNR policy are the products of a particular time and were responses to particular problems. In order to keep the excesses of technology in check, the DNR policies emerged as a response to the in-hospital universal presumed consent to CPR. We live (...)
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  15.  43
    Wisdom Updated.Arthur Falk - 1995 - Philosophy of Science 62 (3):389-403.
    Given the personalist's latitudinarian conception of rationality, what is progress toward wisdom? An answer is in C. I. Lewis's concept of the "congruence" of propositions, propositions so related that the antecedent probability of any one of them will be increased if the remainder can be assumed. This effect can be modelled in the probability calculus with due attention to the temporal sequencing of our learning of contingent propositions without ever becoming certain of them, as Jeffrey proposes. A diachronic (...)
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  16. Growth, Inequality, and Globalization: Theory, History, and Policy.Philippe Aghion & Jeffrey G. Williamson - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    The question of how inequality is generated and how it reproduces over time has been a major concern for social scientists for more than a century. Yet the relationship between inequality and the process of economic development is far from being well understood. These Raffaele Mattioli Lectures have brought together two of the world's leading economists, Professors Philippe Aghion and Jeffrey Williamson, to question the conventional wisdom on inequality and growth, and address its inability to explain recent economic (...)
     
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  17.  23
    “God Does Not Act Arbitrarily, or Interpose Unnecessarily:” Providential Deism and the Denial of Miracles in Wollaston, Tindal, Chubb, and Morgan.Diego Lucci & Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (2):167-189.
    The philosophical debate on miracles in Enlightenment England shows the composite and evolutionary character of the English Enlightenment and, more generally, of the Enlightenment’s relation to religion. In fact, that debate saw the confrontation of divergent positions within the Protestant field and led several deists and freethinkers to resolutely deny the possibility of “things above reason” (i.e. things that, according to such Protestant philosophers as Robert Boyle and John Locke, human reason can neither comprehend nor refute, and that humanity must (...)
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  18.  6
    Nostalgia and Heroism: Theoretical Convergence of Memory, Motivation, and Function.Scott T. Allison & Jeffrey D. Green - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    This article seeks to develop theoretical convergences between the science of nostalgia and the science of heroism. We take four approaches in forging a conceptual relationship between these two phenomena. First, we examine the definitions of nostalgia and heroism from scholars, laypeople, and across cultures, noting how the history of defining the two phenomena has shaped current conceptualizations. Second, we demonstrate how nostalgic experiences consist of reminiscences about our own personal heroism and about cultural role models and heroes. A review (...)
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  19.  5
    Athenagoras on the Divine Nature: The Father, the Son, and the Rational.D. Jeffrey Bingham - 2019 - Perichoresis 17 (1):55-64.
    This essay demonstrates that Athenagoras’ theology is primarily concerned, not with the creative activity of God, as L.W. Barnard has argued, but rather with the immateriality of the divine nature and the unity of the Father and the Son. It is this two-fold basis of distinction and unity that makes the apprehension of God possible only by mind and reason. Since the divine nature is heavenly and immaterial, such apprehension cannot occur in the physical realm as promoted in pagan worship, (...)
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  20.  17
    Jeffrey Barnouw is Professor of English and Comparative Literature in the University of Texas at Austin. He has Published Numerous Articles on Hobbes and Written Extensively on the History of Ideas, Especially 17th-and 18th-Century Thought. His Latest Research has Concentrated on Greek Philosophy and Literature as Well as Their Role in the Later European Tradition. His Recent. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Barnouw - 2008 - Hobbes Studies 21 (1):109-110.
    Hobbes conception of reason as computation or reckoning is significantly different in Part I of De Corpore from what I take to be the later treatment in Leviathan. In the late actual computation with words starts with making an affirmation, framing a proposition. Reckoning then has to do with the consequences of propositions, or how they connect the facts, states of affairs or actions which they refer tor account. Starting from this it can be made clear how Hobbes understood the (...)
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  21.  21
    Wisdom: Twelve Essays.John Wisdom & Renford Bambrough (eds.) - 1974 - Totowa, N.J., Rowman and Littlefield.
    Gasking, D. A. T. The philosophy of John Wisdom.--Thomson, J. J. Moore's technique revisited.--Yalden-Thomson, D. C. The Virginia lectures.--Dilman, I. Paradoxes and discoveries.--Ayers, M. R. Reason and psycholinguistics.--Roberts, G. W. Incorrigibility, behaviourism and predictionism.--Hinton, J. M. "This is visual sensation."--Gunderson, K. The texture of mentality.--Newell, R. W. John Wisdom and the problem of other minds.--Lyon, A. The relevance of Wisdom's work for the philosophy of science.--Morris, H. Shared guilt.--Bambrough, R. Literature and philosophy.--Chronological list of published writings of (...)
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  22.  34
    On the Common Saying That It is Better That ten Guilty Persons Escape Than That One Innocent Suffer: Pro and Con: Jeffrey Reiman and Ernest Van den Haag.Jeffrey Reiman - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):226-248.
    In Zadig, published in 1748, Voltaire wrote of “the great principle that it is better to run the risk of sparing the guilty than to condemn the innocent.” At about the same time, Blackstone noted approvingly that “the law holds that it is better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer.” In 1824, Thomas Fielding cited the principle as an Italian proverb and a maxim of English law. John Stuart Mill endorsed it in an address to Parliament (...)
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  23. Philosophy Between Faith and Theology: Addresses to Catholic Intellectuals.Adriaan Theodoor Peperzak - 2005 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Adriaan Theodoor Peperzak contends that while many Catholic philosophers try to practice a modern, autonomous style of thinking, their experience of a faith-guided life necessarily compels them to integrate their scholarly pursuits with their Christian faith. He writes, "Christians who think cannot separate their thought from their faith and theology." Indeed, he argues that the work of Christian, particularly Catholic, philosophers loses its vitality when philosophers try to restrict their reflections to natural reason alone. In this book he explores the (...)
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  24. Jeffrey Timm (Ed.), Text in Context: Traditional Hermeneutics in South Asia.Jeffrey Timm (ed.) - 1992 - State University of New York Press.
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  25.  6
    Jeffrey Andrew Barash on Continental Divide: Heidegger, Cassirer, Davos, by Peter E. Gordon. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Andrew Barash - 2012 - History and Theory 51 (3):436-450.
    In 1929 Ernst Cassirer and Martin Heidegger participated in a momentous debate in Davos, Switzerland, which is widely held to have marked an important division in twentieth-century European thought. Peter E. Gordon’s recent book, Continental Divide: Heidegger, Cassirer, Davos, centers on this debate between these two philosophical adversaries. In his book Gordon examines the background of the debate, the issues that distinguished the respective positions of Cassirer and Heidegger, and the legacy of the debate for later decades. Throughout the work, (...)
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  26. The Nature and Structure of Content.Jeffrey C. King - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Belief in propositions has had a long and distinguished history in analytic philosophy. Three of the founding fathers of analytic philosophy, Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and G. E. Moore, believed in propositions. Many philosophers since then have shared this belief; and the belief is widely, though certainly not universally, accepted among philosophers today. Among contemporary philosophers who believe in propositions, many, and perhaps even most, take them to be structured entities with individuals, properties, and relations as constituents. For example, the (...)
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  27. Explaining Science: A Cognitive Approach.Jeffrey S. Poland - 1988 - Philosophical Review 100 (4):653-656.
  28. New Thinking About Propositions.Jeffrey C. King, Scott Soames & Jeff Speaks - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy, science, and common sense all refer to propositions--things we believe and say, and things which are true or false. But there is no consensus on what sorts of things these entities are. Jeffrey C. King, Scott Soames, and Jeff Speaks argue that commitment to propositions is indispensable, and each defend their own views on the debate.
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  29.  16
    Garland E. Allen;, Jeffrey Baker. Biology: Scientific Process and Social Issues. Xiv + 236 Pp., Figs., App., Index. Bethesda, Md.: Fitzgerald Science Press, 2001. $23.95. [REVIEW]Jeffrey S. Levinton - 2005 - Isis 96 (3):466-466.
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  30.  11
    Wisdom Won From Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis.Jonathan Lear - 2017 - Harvard University Press.
    What is the appropriate relation of human reason to the human psyche--indeed, to human life--taken as a whole? The essays in this volume range over literature and ethics, psychoanalysis, social theory, and ancient Greek philosophy. But, from different angles, they all address this question. Wisdom Won from Illness probes deep into the heart of psychoanalysis to understand how it illuminates the human condition. At the same time it goes back to the origins of psychological thinking in ancient Greece--and the (...)
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  31. Wisdom.Stephen R. Grimm - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):1-16.
    What is it that makes someone wise, or one person wiser than another? I argue that wisdom consists in knowledge of how to live well, and that this knowledge of how to live well is constituted by various further kinds of knowledge. One concern for this view is that knowledge is not needed for wisdom but rather some state short of knowledge, such as having rational or justified beliefs about various topics. Another concern is that the emphasis on (...)
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  32.  18
    Commentaries by Jeffrey M. Prottas, Olga Jonasson, and John I. Kleinig.Jeffrey M. Prottas - 2002 - In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 3--140.
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  33.  42
    David Miller. A Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 59–61. - Karl R. Popper. A Comment on Miller's New Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 61–69. - Karl R. Popper. A Paradox of Zero Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 141–143. - J. L. Mackie. Miller's so-Called Paradox of Information.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 144–147. - David Miller. On a so-Called so-Called Paradox: A Reply to Professor J. L. Mackie.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 147–149. - Jeffrey Bub and Michael Radner. Miller's Paradox of Information.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 1 , Pp. 63–67. - David Miller. The Straight and Narrow Rule of Induction: A Reply to Dr Bub and Mr Radner.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 2, Pp. 145. [REVIEW]Richard C. Jeffrey - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):124-127.
  34. Wisdom as an Expert Skill.Jason D. Swartwood - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):511-528.
    Practical wisdom is the intellectual virtue that enables a person to make reliably good decisions about how, all-things-considered, to live. As such, it is a lofty and important ideal to strive for. It is precisely this loftiness and importance that gives rise to important questions about wisdom: Can real people develop it? If so, how? What is the nature of wisdom as it manifests itself in real people? I argue that we can make headway answering these questions (...)
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  35.  8
    Interpreting the Quantum World. Jeffrey Bub.Jeffrey Barrett - 2000 - Isis 91 (1):188-189.
  36.  65
    The Jeffreys–Lindley Paradox and Discovery Criteria in High Energy Physics.Robert D. Cousins - 2017 - Synthese 194 (2):395-432.
    The Jeffreys–Lindley paradox displays how the use of a \ value ) in a frequentist hypothesis test can lead to an inference that is radically different from that of a Bayesian hypothesis test in the form advocated by Harold Jeffreys in the 1930s and common today. The setting is the test of a well-specified null hypothesis versus a composite alternative. The \ value, as well as the ratio of the likelihood under the null hypothesis to the maximized likelihood under the (...)
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  37.  7
    Jeffrey Hopkins Responds to David Tracy.Paul Jeffrey Hopkins - 1987 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 7.
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  38.  31
    The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds.Jeffrey Alan Barrett - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Jeffrey Barrett presents the most comprehensive study yet of a problem that has puzzled physicists and philosophers since the 1930s.
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  39.  30
    Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Philosophy of the Future Ed. By Jeffrey Metzger (Review).Jeffrey Church - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (3):495-497.
    In his introduction, Jeffrey Metzger states that “at some point in the past 20 or 30 years … Nietzsche’s name [became] no longer associated primarily with nihilism” (1). Metzger is pointing to the increasing contemporary scholarly interest in Nietzsche’s epistemology, naturalism, and metaethics. The worthy aim of this volume is to ask us to examine once again the underlying philosophical problem to which these views are a response, namely, nihilism. This volume helpfully reminds us that Nietzsche’s philosophical motivation still (...)
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  40. Wisdom, Knowledge and Rationality.Sharon Ryan - 2012 - Acta Analytica 27 (2):99-112.
    After surveying the strengths and weaknesses of several well-known approaches to wisdom, I argue for a new theory of wisdom that focuses on being epistemically, practically, and morally rational. My theory of wisdom, The Deep Rationality Theory of Wisdom, claims that a wise person is a person who is rational and who is deeply committed to increasing his or her level of rationality. This theory is a departure from theories of wisdom that demand practical and/or (...)
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  41.  58
    The Wisdom to Doubt: A Justification of Religious Skepticism.J. L. Schellenberg - 2007 - Cornell University Press.
    The Wisdom to Doubt is a major contribution to the contemporary literature on the epistemology of religious belief.
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  42. Physicalism, the Philosophical Foundations.Jeffrey Poland - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    Physicalism is a program for building a unified system of knowledge about the world on the basis of the view that everything is a manifestation of the physical aspects of existence. Jeffrey Poland presents a systematic and comprehensive exploration of the philosophical foundations of this program. He investigates the core ideas, motivating values, and presuppositions of physicalism; the constraints upon an adequate formulation of physicalist doctrine; the epistemological and modal status, the scope, and the methodological roles of physicalist principles. (...)
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  43. Cultural Pragmatics: Social Performance Between Ritual and Strategy.Jeffrey C. Alexander - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (4):527-573.
    From its very beginnings, the social study of culture has been polarized between structuralist theories that treat meaning as a text and investigate the patterning that provides relative autonomy and pragmatist theories that treat meaning as emerging from the contingencies of individual and collective action-so-called practices-and that analyze cultural patterns as reflections of power and material interest. In this article, I present a theory of cultural pragmatics that transcends this division, bringing meaning structures, contingency, power, and materiality together in a (...)
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  44. Aquinas's Ontology of the Material World: Change, Hylomorphism, and Material Objects.Jeffrey E. Brower - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Jeffrey E. Brower presents and explains the hylomorphic conception of the material world developed by Thomas Aquinas, according to which material objects are composed of both matter and form. In addition to presenting and explaining Aquinas's views, Brower seeks wherever possible to bring them into dialogue with the best recent literature on related topics. Along the way, he highlights the contribution that Aquinas's views make to a host of contemporary metaphysical debates, including the nature of change, composition, material constitution, (...)
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  45. Adversity, Wisdom, and Exemplarism.Ian Kidd - 2018 - Journal of Value Inquiry 52 (4):379-393.
    According to a venerable ideal, the core aim of philosophical practice is wisdom. The guiding concern of the ancient Greek, Indian, and Chinese traditions was the nature of the good life for human beings and the nature of reality. Central to these traditions is profound recognition of the subjection to adversities intrinsic to human life. I consider paradigmatic exemplars of wisdom, from ancient Western and Asian traditions, and the ways that experiences of adversity shaped their life. The suggestion (...)
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  46.  19
    Innocents Lost: Proportional Sentencing and the Paradox of Collateral Damage: Jeffrey Brand-Ballard.Jeffrey Brand-Ballard - 2009 - Legal Theory 15 (2):67-105.
    Retributive restrictions are principles of justice according to which what a criminal deserves on account of his individual conduct and character restricts how states are morally permitted to treat him. The main arguments offered in defense of retributive restrictions involve thought experiments in which the state punishes the innocent, a practice known as telishment. In order to derive retributive restrictions from the wrongness of telishment, one must engage in moral argument from generalization. I show how generalization arguments of the same (...)
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  47. Tense, Modality, and Semantic Values.Jeffrey C. King - 2003 - Philosophical Perspectives 17 (1):195–246.
  48.  47
    Accuracy, Verisimilitude, and Scoring Rules.Jeffrey Dunn - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (1):151-166.
    ABSTRACTSuppose that beliefs come in degrees. How should we then measure the accuracy of these degrees of belief? Scoring rules are usually thought to be the mathematical tool appropriate for this job. But there are many scoring rules, which lead to different ordinal accuracy rankings. Recently, Fallis and Lewis [2016] have given an argument that, if sound, rules out many popular scoring rules, including the Brier score, as genuine measures of accuracy. I respond to this argument, in part by noting (...)
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  49. Wisdom Beyond Rationality: A Reply to Ryan.Iskra Fileva & Jon Tresan - 2013 - Acta Analytica 28 (2):229-235.
    We discuss Sharon Ryan’s Deep Rationality Theory of wisdom, defended recently in her “Wisdom, Knowledge and Rationality.” We argue that (a) Ryan’s use of the term “rationality” needs further elaboration; (b) there is a problem with requiring that the wise person possess justified beliefs but not necessarily knowledge; (c) the conditions of DRT are not all necessary; (d) the conditions are not sufficient. At the end of our discussion, we suggest that there may be a problem with the (...)
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  50.  20
    Practical Wisdom in Complex Medical Practices: A Critical Proposal.C. M. M. L. Bontemps-Hommen, A. Baart & F. T. H. Vosman - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (1):95-105.
    In recent times, daily, ordinary medical practices have incontrovertibly been developing under the condition of complexity. Complexity jeopardizes the moral core of practicing medicine: helping people, with their illnesses and suffering, in a medically competent way. Practical wisdom has been proposed as part of the solution to navigate complexity, aiming at the provision of morally good care. Practical wisdom should help practitioners to maneuver in complexity, where the presupposed linear ways of operating prove to be insufficient. However, this (...)
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