11 found
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  1.  73
    Autonomy and the Unintended Legal Consequences of Emerging Neurotherapies.Jennifer A. Chandler - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (2):249-263.
    One of the ethical issues that has been raised recently regarding emerging neurotherapies is that people will be coerced explicitly or implicitly in the workplace or in schools to take cognitive enhancing drugs. This article builds on this discussion by showing how the law may pressure people to adopt emerging neurotherapies. It focuses on a range of private law doctrines that, unlike the criminal law, do not come up very often in neuroethical discussions. Three doctrines—the doctrine of mitigation, the standard (...)
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  2.  17
    Contextualized Autonomy and Liberalism: Broadening the Lenses on Complementary and Alternative Medicines in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease.Eric Racine, John Aspler, Cynthia Forlini & Jennifer A. Chandler - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):1-41.
    Concerns about the possibility of a sharp rise in the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in Western nations have led to both the significant deployment of resources and the development of national research and healthcare plans. Although often focused on treatment, substantial efforts have also been dedicated toward preventing or delaying AD onset. As a result, recent technological and biomedical advances have greatly improved the understanding of AD pathophysiology. While some new tests can assess only risk ), some tests for certain (...)
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  3.  93
    Another Look at the Legal and Ethical Consequences of Pharmacological Memory Dampening: The Case of Sexual Assault.Jennifer A. Chandler, Alexandra Mogyoros, Tristana Martin Rubio & Eric Racine - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):859-871.
    Research on the use of propranolol as a pharmacological memory dampening treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder is continuing and justifies a second look at the legal and ethical issues raised in the past. We summarize the general ethical and legal issues raised in the literature so far, and we select two for in-depth reconsideration. We address the concern that a traumatized witness may be less effective in a prosecution emerging from the traumatic event after memory dampening treatment. We analyze this (...)
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  4.  24
    Neurolaw and Neuroethics.Jennifer A. Chandler - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):590-598.
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  5.  2
    “Obligatory Technologies”: Explaining Why People Feel Compelled to Use Certain Technologies.Jennifer A. Chandler - 2012 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 32 (4):255-264.
    The ideas of technological determinism and the autonomy of technology are long-standing and widespread. This article explores why the use of certain technologies is perceived to be obligatory, thus fueling the fatalism of technological determinism and undermining our sense of freedom vis-à-vis the use of technologies. Three main mechanisms that might explain “obligatory technologies” are explored. First, competition between individuals or groups drives the adoption of technologies that enhance or extend human capacities. Second, individuals and groups may become dependent on (...)
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  6.  17
    Another Look at the Legal and Ethical Consequences of Pharmacological Memory Dampening: The Case of Sexual Assault.Jennifer A. Chandler, Alexandra Mogyoros, Tristana Martin Rubio & Eric Racine - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):859-871.
    Post-traumatic stress disorder is a “young” disorder formally recognized in the early 1980s, although the symptoms have been noted for centuries particularly in relation to military conflicts. PTSD may develop after a serious traumatic experience that induces feelings of intense fear, helplessness or horror. It is currently characterized by three key classes of symptoms which must cause clinically significant distress or impairment of functioning: persistent and distressing re-experiencing of the trauma; persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma and numbing (...)
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  7.  14
    Online Public Reactions to fMRI Communication with Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: Quality of Life, End-of-Life Decision Making, and Concerns with Misdiagnosis.Jennifer A. Chandler, Jeffrey A. Sun & Eric Racine - 2017 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 8 (1):40-51.
  8.  3
    Brain Computer Interfaces and Communication Disabilities: Ethical, Legal, and Social Aspects of Decoding Speech From the Brain.Jennifer A. Chandler, Kiah I. Van der Loos, Susan Boehnke, Jonas S. Beaudry, Daniel Z. Buchman & Judy Illes - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    A brain-computer interface technology that can decode the neural signals associated with attempted but unarticulated speech could offer a future efficient means of communication for people with severe motor impairments. Recent demonstrations have validated this approach. Here we assume that it will be possible in future to decode imagined speech in people with severe motor impairments, and we consider the characteristics that could maximize the social utility of a BCI for communication. As a social interaction, communication involves the needs and (...)
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  9.  10
    International Legal Approaches to Neurosurgery for Psychiatric Disorders.Jennifer A. Chandler, Laura Y. Cabrera, Paresh Doshi, Shirley Fecteau, Joseph J. Fins, Salvador Guinjoan, Clement Hamani, Karen Herrera-Ferrá, C. Michael Honey, Judy Illes, Brian H. Kopell, Nir Lipsman, Patrick J. McDonald, Helen S. Mayberg, Roland Nadler, Bart Nuttin, Albino J. Oliveira-Maia, Cristian Rangel, Raphael Ribeiro, Arleen Salles & Hemmings Wu - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    Neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders, also sometimes referred to as psychosurgery, is rapidly evolving, with new techniques and indications being investigated actively. Many within the field have suggested that some form of guidelines or regulations are needed to help ensure that a promising field develops safely. Multiple countries have enacted specific laws regulating NPD. This article reviews NPD-specific laws drawn from North and South America, Asia and Europe, in order to identify the typical form and contents of these laws and to (...)
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  10.  3
    The COVID-19 Pandemic and Organ Donation and Transplantation: Ethical Issues.Marie-Chantal Fortin, T. Murray Wilson, Lindsay C. Wilson, Matthew-John Weiss, Christy Simpson, Laura Hornby, David Hartell, Aviva Goldberg, Jennifer A. Chandler, Rosanne Dawson & Ban Ibrahim - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the health system worldwide. The organ and tissue donation and transplantation system is no exception and has had to face ethical challenges related to the pandemic, such as risks of infection and resource allocation. In this setting, many Canadian transplant programs halted their activities during the first wave of the pandemic.MethodTo inform future ethical guidelines related to the COVID-19 pandemic or other public health emergencies of international concern, we conducted a literature (...)
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  11.  17
    Biocriminal Justice: Exploring Public Attitudes to Criminal Rehabilitation Using Biomedical Treatments.Robin Whitehead & Jennifer A. Chandler - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (1):55-71.
    Biomedical interventions, such as pharmacological and neurological interventions, are increasingly being offered or considered for offer to offenders in the criminal justice system as a means of reducing recidivism and achieving offender rehabilitation through treatment. An offender’s consent to treatment may affect decisions about diversion from the criminal justice system, sentence or parole, and so hope for a preferable treatment in the criminal justice system may influence the offender’s consent. This thematic analysis of three focus group interviews conducted in Canada (...)
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