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Jennifer Bleazby [11]Jennifer B. Bleazby [1]
  1.  56
    Rethinking teacher preparation for teaching controversial topics in a community of inquiry.Simone Thornton, Gilbert Burgh, Jennifer Bleazby & Mary Graham - 2023 - In Arie Kizel (ed.), Philosophy with children and teacher education: Global perspectives on critical, creative and caring thinking. Abingdon; New York: Routledge. pp. 194-203.
    Contemporary socio-political issues often seen as socially controversial and highly politicised topics, such as anthropogenic climate change, public scepticism over preventive public health measures during pandemics such as COVID-19, and Indigenous sovereignty, lands rights, and ways of knowing, being and doing, highlight the need for education to address such issues more effectively. Controversial issues do not exist in isolation. They are connected to questions of order, interpretation, meaning-making, ethics, and why and how we live, i.e., to philosophical questions. We argue (...)
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  2.  22
    Editorial. Teaching about climate change in the midst of ecological crisis: Responsibilities, challenges, and possibilities.Jennifer Bleazby, Gilbert Burgh, Simone Thornton, Mary Graham, Alan Reid & Ilana Finefter-Rosenbluh - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (10):1087–1095.
    One challenge posed by climate change education is that, despite the scientific consensus on human induced climate change, the issue is controversial and politicised. A recent poll conducted in the USA revealed that 45% of respondents did not believe that human activity is a key cause of climate change, while 8.3% denied that climate change was occurring at all. The poll also found that those with conservative political beliefs were far more likely to deny anthropogenic climate change. The controversial nature (...)
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  3.  5
    Social reconstruction learning: dualism, Dewey and philosophy in schools.Jennifer Bleazby - 2013 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume argues that educational problems have their basis in an ideology of binary opposites often referred to as dualism, and that it is partly because mainstream schooling incorporates dualism that it is unable to facilitate the thinking skills, dispositions and understandings necessary for autonomy, democratic citizenship and leading a meaningful life. Bleazby proposes an approach to schooling termed social reconstruction learning, in which students engage in philosophical inquiries with members of their community in order to reconstruct real social problems, (...)
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  4.  72
    Dewey's Notion of Imagination in Philosophy for Children.Jennifer B. Bleazby - 2012 - Education and Culture 28 (2):95-111.
    Kieran Egan states that imagination "is a concept that has come down to us with a history of suspicion and mistrust" (2007, p. 4). Like experience and the emotions, the imagination is frequently thought to be an obstacle to reason. While reason is conceived of as an abstract, objective and rule-governed method of delivering absolute truths, the imagination is considered "unconstrained, arbitrary, and fanciful," as well as "particular, subjective, and idiosyncratic" (Jo 2002, p. 39). This negative view of the imagination (...)
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  5. Autonomy, Democratic Community, and Citizenship in Philosophy for Children: Dewey and Philosophy for Children’s Rejection of the Individual/ Community Dualism.Jennifer Bleazby - 2006 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 26 (1):30-52.
  6. Overcoming Relativism and Absolutism: Dewey's ideals of truth and meaning in philosophy for children.Jennifer Bleazby - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):453-466.
    Different notions of truth imply and encourage different ideals of thinking, knowledge, meaning, and learning. Thus, these concepts have fundamental importance for educational theory and practice. In this paper, I intend to draw out and clarify the notions of truth, knowledge and meaning that are implied by P4C's pedagogical ideals. There is some disagreement amongst P4C theorists and practitioners about whether the community of inquiry implies either relativism or absolutism. I will argue that both relativism and absolutism are incompatible with (...)
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  7. Practicality and Philosophy for Children.Jennifer Bleazby - 2004 - Critical and Creative Thinking 12 (2).
  8.  74
    Responding to climate change ‘controversy’ in schools: Philosophy for Children, place-responsive pedagogies & Critical Indigenous Pedagogy.Jennifer Bleazby, Simone Thornton, Gilbert Burgh & Mary Graham - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (10):1096–1108.
    Despite the scientific consensus, climate change continues to be socially and politically controversial. Consequently, teachers may worry about accusations of political indoctrination if they teach climate change in their classrooms. Research shows that many teachers are using the ‘teaching the controversy’ approach to teach climate change, essentially allowing students to make up their own mind about climate change. Drawing on some philosophical literature about indoctrination and controversial issues, we argue that such an approach is inappropriate and, given the escalating crisis (...)
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  9.  5
    Education.Jennifer Bleazby - 2019 - In Graham Oppy (ed.), A Companion to Atheism and Philosophy. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 381–395.
    This chapter examines key arguments for and against the teaching of religion, atheism, and philosophy‐based ethics in schools. These arguments are examined within the context of the controversy that erupted when an ethics curriculum was introduced into state primary schools in New South Wales, Australia, in 2010. This ethics curriculum is an alternative to special religious education (i.e., religious education that aims to inculcate students with the beliefs of one faith). During the debate that ensued, well‐known arguments relating to the (...)
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  10. Philosophy for children goes to university.Jennifer Bleazby & Christina Slade - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The development of an inquiring society in Australia. Routledge.
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  11.  32
    Philosophy for Children as a Response to Gender Problems.Jennifer Bleazby - 2009 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 19 (2-3):70-78.
    This paper will outline some of the ways in which traditional pedagogies facilitate ‘masculine’ ideals of thinking, while excluding and denigrating the ‘feminine’. It will be shown that unlike traditional pedagogies, P4C reconstructs the gendered dualisms (e.g. mind/body, reason/emotion, individual/community) that form the basis of traditional gender stereotypes. Consequently, P4C reconstructs traditional gender stereotypes and challenges the traditional gendering of school subjects, which contributes to the underperformance of girls in math and science and the devaluation of the ‘feminine’ arts and (...)
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  12.  16
    In community with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, philosophy and education. [REVIEW]Jennifer Bleazby - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (14):1541-1542.
    Volume 51, Issue 14, December 2019, Page 1541-1542.
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