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Jennifer Kling
University of Colorado, Colorado Springs
  1.  7
    The Semantic Foundations of White Fragility and the Consequences for Justice.Jennifer Kling & Leland Harper - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (2):325-344.
    This essay extends Robin DiAngelo’s concept of white fragility in two directions. First, we outline an additional cause of white fragility. The lack of proper terminology available to discuss race-based situations creates a semantic false dichotomy, which often results in an inability to discuss issues of racism in a way that is likely to have positive consequences, either for interpersonal relationships or for social and political change. Second, we argue that white fragility, with its semantic foundations, has serious consequences for (...)
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  2.  28
    Bottles and Bricks.Jennifer Kling & Megan Mitchell - 2019 - Radical Philosophy Review 22 (2):209-237.
    We argue that violent political protest is justified in a generally just society when violence is required to send a message about the nature of the injustice at issue, and when it is not ruled out by moral or pragmatic considerations. Focusing on protest as a mode of public address, we argue that its communicative function can sometimes justify or require the use of violence. The injustice at the heart of the Baltimore protests—police brutality against black Americans —is a paradigmatic (...)
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  3.  35
    Who Owes What to War Refugees.Jennifer Kling - 2016 - Journal of Global Ethics 12 (3):327-346.
    The suffering of war refugees is often regarded as a wrong-less harm. Although war refugees have been made worse off in severe ways, they have not been wronged, because no one intentionally caused their suffering. In military parlance, war refugees are collateral damage. As such, nothing is owed to them as a matter of justice, because their suffering is not the result of intentional wrongdoing; rather, it is the regrettable and unintended result of necessary and proportionate wartime actions. So, while (...)
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  4.  15
    Engaging in a Cover-Up: The “Deep Morality” of War.Jennifer Kling - 2019 - In Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations. The Netherlands: pp. 96-116.
    This chapter examines whether, as Jeff McMahan argues, we should not integrate what he refers to as the “deep morality” of war into our military and international public policies and laws, because of the possible negative consequences of doing so. On the basis of feminist epistemology, I argue that McMahan is wrong to think that publicizing and legalizing the deep morality of war will have the negative consequences that he claims. Through a comparison with the Women's Suffrage Movement in the (...)
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  5.  25
    Humanitarian Intervention and the Problem of Genocide and Atrocity.Jennifer Kling - 2018 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 327-346.
    We tend to think that mass atrocities and attempted genocides call for humanitarian intervention by other states. (Nonviolent intervention if possible, military intervention if need be.) In this chapter, I discuss these two related claims in turn. What, if anything, justifies humanitarian intervention in certain states by other states? Ought such interventions, if justified, be pacifist in nature, or is it legitimate in some cases to intervene violently? To discuss these questions, I draw primarily on principles and arguments found in (...)
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  6.  3
    Author Court D. Lewis Meets Critics on Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness.Court D. Lewis, Gregory L. Bock, David Boersema & Jennifer Kling - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):19-41.
    Court D. Lewis, author of Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness, presents a rights-based theory of ethics grounded in eirenéism, a needs-based theory of rights that seeks peaceful flourishing for all moral agents. This approach creates a moral relationship between victims and wrongdoers such that wrongdoers owe victims compensatory obligations. However, one further result is that wrongdoers may be owed forgiveness by victims. This leads to the “repugnant implication” that victims may be wrongdoers who do not forgive. Author Lewis addresses (...)
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  7.  15
    On Inequality, by Harry G. Frankfurt. [REVIEW]Jennifer Kling - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):377-380.
  8.  14
    Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations.Jennifer Kling (ed.) - 2019 - The Netherlands: Brill | Rodopi.
    This anthology explores the many and varied connections between pacifism, politics, and feminism. Each topic is often thought about in academic isolation; however, when we consider how they intersect and interact, it opens up new areas for discussion and analysis.
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  9.  6
    War Refugees: Risk, Justice, and Moral Responsibility.Jennifer Kling - 2019 - New York, USA: Lexington Books.
    Jennifer Kling argues that war refugees suffer a series of wrongs and oppressions and so are owed restitution and aid—as a matter of justice—by socio political institutions. She makes the case that they should be viewed differently than migrants but that their circumstances do not wholly alleviate their own moral responsibilities.
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