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Jennifer Kling
University of Colorado, Colorado Springs
  1.  72
    Bottles and Bricks: Rethinking the Prohibition Against Violent Political Protest.Jennifer Kling & Megan Mitchell - 2019 - Radical Philosophy Review 22 (2):209-237.
    We argue that violent political protest is justified in a generally just society when violence is required to send a message about the nature of the injustice at issue, and when it is not ruled out by moral or pragmatic considerations. Focusing on protest as a mode of public address, we argue that its communicative function can sometimes justify or require the use of violence. The injustice at the heart of the Baltimore protests—police brutality against black Americans —is a paradigmatic (...)
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  2.  45
    Who Owes What to War Refugees.Jennifer Kling - 2016 - Journal of Global Ethics 12 (3):327-346.
    The suffering of war refugees is often regarded as a wrong-less harm. Although war refugees have been made worse off in severe ways, they have not been wronged, because no one intentionally caused their suffering. In military parlance, war refugees are collateral damage. As such, nothing is owed to them as a matter of justice, because their suffering is not the result of intentional wrongdoing; rather, it is the regrettable and unintended result of necessary and proportionate wartime actions. So, while (...)
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  3. Social and Political “Statutes of Limitations”: Mo' Approaches, Mo' Problems.Jennifer Kling & Colin J. Lewis - 2022 - In Court D. Lewis (ed.), Forgiveness Confronts Race, Relationships, and the Social. Wilmington, DE, USA: pp. 91-111.
    Recent events have directed public attention to the issue of whether there should be so-called “statutes of limitations” on oppressive transgressions committed in the past. We ask: in such cases, is sociopolitical forgiveness (or “forgetfulness”) owed to transgressors? We detail two moral-political narratives that might help address this issue: one constructed around the values and perspectives of justice, rights, and autonomy-based views (the JRA approach), and another oriented around the values and perspectives of care ethics, virtue ethics, and relationality, drawing (...)
     
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  4.  27
    The Semantic Foundations of White Fragility and the Consequences for Justice.Jennifer Kling & Leland Harper - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (2):325-344.
    This essay extends Robin DiAngelo’s concept of white fragility in two directions. First, we outline an additional cause of white fragility. The lack of proper terminology available to discuss race-based situations creates a semantic false dichotomy, which often results in an inability to discuss issues of racism in a way that is likely to have positive consequences, either for interpersonal relationships or for social and political change. Second, we argue that white fragility, with its semantic foundations, has serious consequences for (...)
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  5.  36
    Humanitarian Intervention and the Problem of Genocide and Atrocity.Jennifer Kling - 2018 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 327-346.
    We tend to think that mass atrocities and attempted genocides call for humanitarian intervention by other states. (Nonviolent intervention if possible, military intervention if need be.) In this chapter, I discuss these two related claims in turn. What, if anything, justifies humanitarian intervention in certain states by other states? Ought such interventions, if justified, be pacifist in nature, or is it legitimate in some cases to intervene violently? To discuss these questions, I draw primarily on principles and arguments found in (...)
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  6.  26
    Engaging in a Cover-Up: The “Deep Morality” of War.Jennifer Kling - 2019 - In Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations. The Netherlands: pp. 96-116.
    This chapter examines whether, as Jeff McMahan argues, we should not integrate what he refers to as the “deep morality” of war into our military and international public policies and laws, because of the possible negative consequences of doing so. On the basis of feminist epistemology, I argue that McMahan is wrong to think that publicizing and legalizing the deep morality of war will have the negative consequences that he claims. Through a comparison with the Women's Suffrage Movement in the (...)
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  7.  2
    Rage Against the Machine: The Virtues of Anger in Response to Oppression.Jennifer Kling - 2020 - In Courtland Lewis & Gregory L. Bock (eds.), The Ethics of Anger. New York, NY, USA: pp. 199-213.
    Oppression makes me angry. So, I am angry almost all of the time, as oppression (of various kinds) is endemic to our socio-political world. However, there is a growing philosophical literature that argues against anger as a necessary, virtuous, or important response to wrongdoing. Martha Nussbaum, in particular, argues that “anger is always normatively problematic, whether in the personal or in the public realm.” It is certainly true that anger can have bad or problematic effects, and it may well be (...)
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  8.  14
    Author Court D. Lewis Meets Critics on Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness.Court D. Lewis, Gregory L. Bock, David Boersema & Jennifer Kling - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):19-41.
    Court D. Lewis, author of Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness, presents a rights-based theory of ethics grounded in eirenéism, a needs-based theory of rights that seeks peaceful flourishing for all moral agents. This approach creates a moral relationship between victims and wrongdoers such that wrongdoers owe victims compensatory obligations. However, one further result is that wrongdoers may be owed forgiveness by victims. This leads to the “repugnant implication” that victims may be wrongdoers who do not forgive. Author Lewis addresses (...)
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  9. Racist, Not Racist, Antiracist: Language and the Dynamic Disaster of American Racism.Leland Harper & Jennifer Kling - 2022 - Lexington Books.
    This book unearths and outlines the semantic foundations of white fragility and their consequences for racial justice in the United States. It argues that by expanding our racial vocabulary in certain ways, we can make progress toward justice equally enjoyed by all.
     
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  10. Justified Revolution in Contemporary American Democracy: A Confucian-Inspired Account.Jennifer Kling & Colin J. Lewis - 2022 - In LeLand Harper (ed.), The Crisis of American Democracy: Essays on a Failing Institution. New York, NY, USA: pp. 167-192.
    How much injustice and oppression must be tolerated before a revolution is justified? In theory, the United States’ political structure, by design, makes the question of revolution obsolete: by putting political power into the hands of the people via democratic mechanisms such as voting, the division of power among separate branches of government, and representative influence and control, there should be no need for revolution because everything the government does either has the consent of the people or is (relatively swiftly) (...)
     
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  11. Not Even Close to a (Fair) Fight: Technology and the Future of War.Jennifer Kling - 2021 - Philosophical Journal of Conflict and Violence 5 (1):1-17.
    The exponential expansion and advancement of wartime technology has the potential to wipe out ‘war’ as a meaningful category. Assuming that the creation of new wartime technologies continues to accelerate, it could soon be the case that there will no longer be wars, but rather mass killings, slaughters, or genocides. This is because the concept of ‘war’ entails that opposing sides either will, or are able to, fight back against one another to some recognizable degree. In fact, this is one (...)
     
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  12.  27
    Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations.Jennifer Kling (ed.) - 2019 - The Netherlands: Brill | Rodopi.
    This anthology explores the many and varied connections between pacifism, politics, and feminism. Each topic is often thought about in academic isolation; however, when we consider how they intersect and interact, it opens up new areas for discussion and analysis.
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  13.  6
    The Philosophy of Protest: Fighting for Justice Without Going to War.Jennifer Kling & Megan Mitchell - 2021 - New York: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Rather than looking at protest in the ideal case, this book looks at how protest is actually practiced and argues that suitably constrained violent political protest is sometimes justified.
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  14. The U.S. Military Needs to Budget: Decreasing Military Spending in the 21st Century.Jennifer Kling - 2019 - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Ethics, Left and Right: The Moral Issues That Divide Us. Oxford, UK: pp. Chapter 20.
    I argue that the U.S. ought to reduce its military spending. I first address consequentialist political arguments regarding military spending that are focused on safety and security, and the economy. I then address a justice-oriented argument regarding military spending that is focused on domestic and international opportunity costs. Ultimately, whether the concern is about the consequences of decreasing military spending, or the justice of decreasing military spending, I conclude that we ought to decrease U.S. military spending.
     
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  15.  15
    War Refugees: Risk, Justice, and Moral Responsibility.Jennifer Kling - 2019 - New York, USA: Lexington Books.
    Jennifer Kling argues that war refugees suffer a series of wrongs and oppressions and so are owed restitution and aid—as a matter of justice—by socio political institutions. She makes the case that they should be viewed differently than migrants but that their circumstances do not wholly alleviate their own moral responsibilities.
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  16.  26
    On Inequality, by Harry G. Frankfurt. [REVIEW]Jennifer Kling - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):377-380.
  17.  1
    Wealth, Violence, and (In)Justice: Refugees, Robin Hood, and Resistance.Jennifer Kling - 2022 - In Sanjay Lal (ed.), Peaceful Approaches for a More Peaceful World. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 270-288.
    This chapter interrogates the intersections between wealth, violence, and justice by considering two very different cases: refugees who have had their wealth taken from them, and political activists who are considering using Robin-Hood-style tactics to protest economic injustice. Ordinarily, the involuntary loss of wealth that refugees suffer, while it is viewed as an injustice, is not considered a violent injustice. However, when the involuntary redistribution of wealth is brought up in the context of resolving long-standing economic injustices, opponents cry out (...)
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