7 found
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  1.  1
    Just and Unjust Military Intervention: European Thinkers From Vitoria to Mill.Stefano Recchia & Jennifer M. Welsh (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Classical arguments about the legitimate use of force have profoundly shaped the norms and institutions of contemporary international society. But what specific lessons can we learn from the classical European philosophers and jurists when thinking about humanitarian intervention, preventive self-defense or international trusteeship today? The contributors to this volume take seriously the admonition of contextualist scholars not to uproot classical thinkers' arguments from their social, political and intellectual environment. Nevertheless, this collection demonstrates that contemporary students, scholars and policymakers can still (...)
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  2.  38
    Conclusion: Humanitarian Intervention After 11 September.Jennifer M. Welsh - 2004 - In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press.
    This concluding chapter assesses the debate over humanitarian intervention in the light of the events of September 11, 2001. On the one hand, it can be argued that 9/11 has reversed the momentum behind the norm of ‘sovereignty as responsibility’. In the course of waging the war on terrorism, the powers of sovereign states have been increased and the willingness of Western states to criticize the treatment of civilians within other sovereign jurisdictions appears to have weakened. On the other, there (...)
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  3. Taking Consequences Seriously: Objections to Humanitarian Intervention.Jennifer M. Welsh - 2003 - In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press.
    Outlines and evaluates the political, legal, and ethical objections to humanitarian intervention. In so doing, it questions not only whether the doctrine of ‘sovereignty as responsibility’ has taken hold in international society, but also whether it should – particularly in the form suggested by Western states. The author argues that the ethical position of pluralism – as articulated by non-Western states – represents the most compelling case against humanitarian intervention, by emphasizing the impact on international society of relaxing the norm (...)
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  4. Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations.Jennifer M. Welsh (ed.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Should states use military force for humanitarian purposes? Leading scholars and practitioners provide practical and theoretical answers to this burning question, demonstrating why humanitarian intervention continues to be a controversial issue, not only for the UN, but also for Western states and humanitarian organizations.
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  5.  8
    Introduction.Jennifer M. Welsh - 2004 - In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press.
    Three main themes emerge from this edited collection. First, there has been an increased incidence of intervention for humanitarian purposes since the end of the Cold War. In these cases, the alleged conflict between sovereignty and human rights has been addressed in one of two ways: through an evolution in the notion of sovereignty, from ‘sovereignty as authority’ to ‘sovereignty as responsibility’; and through an expanded definition of what constitutes a threat to international peace and security under Chapter VII of (...)
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  6. Conclusion: The Evolution of Humanitarian Intervention in International Society.Jennifer M. Welsh - 2006 - In Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations. Oxford University Press. pp. 176--188.
  7.  13
    The Role of the Inner Enemy in European Self-Definition: Identity, Culture and International Relations Theory.Jennifer M. Welsh - 1994 - History of European Ideas 19 (1-3):53-61.