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Jennifer Rosato [8]Jennifer L. Rosato [1]Jennifer E. Rosato [1]
  1.  34
    Woman as Vulnerable Self: The Trope of Maternity in Levinas's Otherwise Than Being.Jennifer Rosato - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):348-365.
    Much due criticism has been directed at Levinas's images of the feminine and “the Woman” in Time and the Other and Totality and Infinity, but less attention has been paid to the metaphor of maternity and the maternal body that Levinas employs in Otherwise Than Being. This metaphor should be of interest, however, because here we find an instance in which Levinas uses a female image without in any way seeming to exclude women from full ethical selfhood.In the first three (...)
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  2.  7
    The Ethics of Clinical Trials: A Child's View.Jennifer Rosato - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (4):362-378.
    Until a few years ago, the prevailing view was that children should not be participants in clinical research trials because children were incapable of consenting to such nontherapeutic interventions and are particularly vulnerable to abuse. That view has undergone a significant shift in the last few years, particularly in the context of trials to test the safety and effectiveness of drugs. A number of events facilitated this change, including the widespread off-label distribution of drugs to children and developments in the (...)
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  3.  19
    For You Alone: Emmanuel Levinas and the Answerable Life. By Terry A. Veling.Jennifer E. Rosato - 2016 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):167-170.
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  4.  22
    Sartre and Levinas as Phenomenologists.Jennifer Rosato - 2014 - Philosophy Today 58 (3):467-475.
    Almost from its origins, phenomenology has been modified in various ways by ‘phenomenologists’ who are inspired by Husserl but who deviate in significant ways from certain details of his approach. Jean-Paul Sartre and Emmanuel Levinas are two prime examples. While each is widely identified as a phenomenologist, each also departs from Husserl, the former by using phenomenology to pursue ontological questions and the latter by describing non-intentional modes of appearing. Here I argue that each is nevertheless rightly called a phenomenologist (...)
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  5.  25
    Pragmatism and Democracy: An Interview of Richard Rorty.Joaquin Fortanet & Jennifer Rosato - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Research 34:1-5.
    When Richard Rorty passed away in June of 2007, we lost a philosopher who contributed to a major number of philosophical currents, a thinker who, with his writing, managed to be at a height of an epoch. This interview was conducted during the year 2005–2006, and it has not been published in English. I publish it now as a way of honoring one of the most interesting philosophers of recent years.
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  6.  18
    Loving More, Being Less: Reflections on Vladimir Jankélévitch’s Le Paradoxe de la Morale.Jennifer Rosato - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):84-103.
    In Le paradoxe de la morale, Vladimir Jankélévitch proposes that the moral life is a matter of balancing the demands of love, which call us to give without limit, and our natural, egoistical attachment to self, which he terms 'being'. This balancing act is ultimately paradoxical since love must both depend on and overcome being. The vision of moral life as a paradoxical balancing act of love and being, however, is implicitly challenged by another, "supernatural" vision of ethics that Jankélévitch (...)
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  7.  13
    Levinas on Skepticism, Moral and Otherwise.Jennifer Rosato - 2015 - Philosophy Today 59 (3):429-450.
    At the start of Totality and Infinity, Emmanuel Levinas announces his project as one that will respond to the challenge of moral skepticism. Meanwhile, in a section titled “Skepticism and Reason” near the end of Otherwise than Being, Levinas interprets the recurrence of skepticism within philosophical reflection as a positive sign of the saying that refuses to be absorbed in the said. Here, I discuss the relationship between these two discussions of skepticism, and argue that Levinas’s appeal to a variety (...)
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