Results for 'Jenny Ostergren'

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  1.  30
    The Media and Behavioral Genetics: Alternatives Coexisting with Addiction Genetics.Barbara A. Koenig, Rachel Hammer, Jennifer B. McCormick, Jenny Ostergren & Molly J. Dingel - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (4):459-486.
    To understand public discourse in the United States on genetic causation of behavioral disorders, we analyzed media representations of genetic research on addiction published between 1990 and 2010. We conclude first that the media simplistically represent biological bases of addiction and willpower as being mutually exclusive: behaviors are either genetically determined, or they are a choice. Second, most articles provide only cursory or no treatment of the environmental contribution. A media focus on genetics directs attention away from environmental factors. Rhetorically, (...)
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  2.  34
    Our Strange Body: Philosophical Reflections on Identity and Medical Interventions.Jenny Slatman (ed.) - 2014 - Amsterdam University Press.
    The ever increasing ability of medical technology to reshape the human body in fundamental ways—from organ and tissue transplants to reconstructive surgery and prosthetics—is something now largely taken for granted. But for a philosopher, such interventions raise fundamental and fascinating questions about our sense of individual identity and its relationship to the physical body. Drawing on and engaging with philosophers from across the centuries, Jenny Slatman here develops a novel argument: that our own body always entails a strange dimension, (...)
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  3.  72
    Current Dilemmas in Defining the Boundaries of Disease.Jenny Doust, Mary Jean Walker & Wendy A. Rogers - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (4):350-366.
    Boorse’s biostatistical theory states that diseases should be defined in ways that reflect disturbances of biological function and that are objective and value free. We use three examples from contemporary medicine that demonstrate the complex issues that arise when defining the boundaries of disease: polycystic ovary syndrome, chronic kidney disease, and myocardial infarction. We argue that the biostatistical theory fails to provide sufficient guidance on where the boundaries of disease should be drawn, contains ambiguities relating to choice of reference class, (...)
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  4.  9
    On the Emergence of Science and Justice.Jenny Reardon - 2013 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (2):176-200.
    In the last few years, justice has emerged as a matter of concern for the contemporary constitution of technoscience. Increasingly, both practicing scientists and engineers and scholars of science and technology cite justice as an organizing theme of their work. In this essay, I consider why “science and justice” might be arising now. I then ask after the opportunities, but also the dangers, of this formation. By way of example, I explore the openings and exclusions created by the recent conjugation (...)
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  5.  34
    Community through Culture: From Insects to Whales.Jenny A. Allen - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (11):1900060.
    It has become increasingly clear that social learning and culture occur much more broadly, and in a wider variety of animal communities, than initially believed. Recent research has expanded the list to include insects, fishes, elephants, and cetaceans. Such diversity allows scientists to expand the scope of potential research questions, which can help form a more complete understanding of animal culture than any single species can provide on its own. It is crucial to understand how culture and social learning present (...)
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  6.  20
    The “neglected” left hemisphere and its contribution to visuospatial neglect.Jenni A. Ogden - 1987 - In Marc Jeannerod (ed.), Neurophysiological and Neuropsychological Aspects of Spatial Neglect. Elsevier Science. pp. 1--215.
  7.  43
    Nurses' Perceptions of Ethical Issues in the Care of Older People.Jenny Rees, Lindy King & Karl Schmitz - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (4):436-452.
    The aim of this thematic literature review is to explore nurses' perceptions of ethical issues in the care of older people. Electronic databases were searched from September 1997 to September 2007 using specific key words with tight inclusion criteria, which revealed 17 primary research reports. The data analysis involved repeated reading of the findings and sorting of those findings into four themes. These themes are: sources of ethical issues for nurses; differences in perceptions between nurses and patients/relatives; nurses' personal responses (...)
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  8.  11
    Navigating parental requests: considering the relational potential standard in paediatric end-of-life care in the paediatric intensive care unit.Jenny Kingsley, Jonna Clark, Mithya Lewis-Newby, Denise Marie Dudzinski & Douglas Diekema - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Families and clinicians approaching a child’s death in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) frequently encounter questions surrounding medical decision-making at the end of life (EOL), including defining what is in the child’s best interest, finding an optimal balance of benefit over harm, and sometimes addressing potential futility and moral distress. The best interest standard (BIS) is often marshalled by clinicians to help navigate these dilemmas and focuses on a clinician’s primary ethical duty to the paediatric patient. This approach does (...)
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  9. The surprising thing about musical surprise.Jenny Judge - 2018 - Analysis 78 (2):225-234.
    The experience of musical surprise is explained by psychologists in terms of the thwarting of prior musical expectations. The assumption that surprise is always caused by expectations is widespread not just in psychology at large, but also in philosophy. I argue here that this assumption is ill-founded. Many musical surprises, as well as many non-musical instances of perceptual surprise, can be explained by the falsification of assessments of the present, rendering the appeal to expectations unnecessary. I elaborate the positive view (...)
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  10.  11
    Towards an Anti-racist Feminism.Jenny Bourne - 1984
  11. William Kelly, OAM, humanist artist.Jennie Stuart - 2015 - Australian Humanist, The 117:12.
    Stuart, Jennie This is not intended to be a discussion about humanist art, its place in the history of art or a detailed coverage of work which might be described as such. I am not qualified to do so. However, I believe, it is a field which could be explored further by Australian Humanists.
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  12.  36
    Relativity of Value and the Consequentialist Umbrella.Jennie Lousie - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (217):518-536.
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  13.  9
    Saving time: discovering a life beyond the clock.Jenny Odell - 2023 - New York: Random House.
    Our daily experience, dominated by the corporate clock that so many of us contort ourselves to fit inside, is destroying us. It wasn't built for people, it was built for profit. This is a book that tears open the seams of reality as we know it-the way we experience time itself-and rearranges it, reimagining a world not centered around work, the office clock, or the profit motive. Explaining how we got to the point where time became money, Odell offers us (...)
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  14. Counterpossibles in Science: The Case of Relative Computability.Matthias Jenny - 2018 - Noûs 52 (3):530-560.
    I develop a theory of counterfactuals about relative computability, i.e. counterfactuals such as 'If the validity problem were algorithmically decidable, then the halting problem would also be algorithmically decidable,' which is true, and 'If the validity problem were algorithmically decidable, then arithmetical truth would also be algorithmically decidable,' which is false. These counterfactuals are counterpossibles, i.e. they have metaphysically impossible antecedents. They thus pose a challenge to the orthodoxy about counterfactuals, which would treat them as uniformly true. What’s more, I (...)
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  15.  19
    Civic Mandates for the ‘Majority’: The Perception of Whiteness and Open Classroom Climate in Predicting Youth Civic Engagement.Jenni Conrad, Jane C. Lo & Zahid Kisa - 2022 - Journal of Social Studies Research 46 (1):7-17.
    Informed by Critical Race Theory, this quantitative study supports civic educators in understanding the role of classroom climate and racial identity in students’ civic engagement during a statewide middle school civics mandate (n = 4707). Findings reveal that students of color experience higher civic engagement and lower civic attitude scores than white-identifying peers, after controlling for school, classroom, and affluence indicators. Students’ perception of whiteness (or perhaps majority status) appeared to correlate with positive civic knowledge and civic attitude, but relative (...)
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  16. Relativity of value and the consequentialist umbrella.Jennie Louise - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (217):518–536.
    Does the real difference between non-consequentialist and consequentialist theories lie in their approach to value? Non-consequentialist theories are thought either to allow a different kind of value (namely, agent-relative value) or to advocate a different response to value ('honouring' rather than 'promoting'). One objection to this idea implies that all normative theories are describable as consequentialist. But then the distinction between honouring and promoting collapses into the distinction between relative and neutral value. A proper description of non-consequentialist theories can only (...)
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  17.  33
    Taking this deft self-description as a point of departure, I reflect as a feminist philosopher on feminist artist Jenny Saville's portrait of its author, Del LaGrace Volcano, together with a Saville self-portrait as a cosmetic surgery patient. 1 In this study of Matrix (1999, oil on canvas, seven feet by ten feet) and Plan (1993, oil on canvas, nine feet by seven feet), I analyze how Saville's artistic practice conveys. [REVIEW]Jenny Saville Portraits - 2009 - In Laurie Shrage (ed.), You’Ve Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Oup Usa.
  18.  54
    Dog is a dog is a dog: Infant rule learning is not specific to language.Jenny R. Saffran, Seth D. Pollak, Rebecca L. Seibel & Anna Shkolnik - 2007 - Cognition 105 (3):669-680.
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  19.  67
    Phenomenology of Bodily Integrity in Disfiguring Breast Cancer.Jenny Slatman - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):281-300.
    In this paper, I explore the meaning of bodily integrity in disfiguring breast cancer. Bodily integrity is a normative principle precisely because it does not simply refer to actual physical or functional intactness. It rather indicates what should be regarded and respected as inviolable in vulnerable and damageable bodies. I will argue that this normative inviolability or wholeness can be based upon a person's embodied experience of wholeness. This phenomenological stance differs from the liberal view that identifies respect for integrity (...)
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  20.  16
    Kingdoms and crowds: William Ockham on the ontology of social groups.Jenny Pelletier - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (1):24-44.
    ABSTRACT This paper reconstructs William of Ockham's (c. 1287–1347) account of the ontology of social groups. Across his writings, Ockham mentions kingdoms, religious orders, crowds, people, armies, and corporations. Using the political community as a case-study against the background of Ockham’s metaphysics of parts and wholes, it is argued that at least some social groups are identical to a plurality of many human beings who have decided to order themselves with respect to another in some particular way. In this regard, (...)
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  21. Ethical medical data donation: a pressing issue.Jenny Krutzinna & Luciano Floridi - 2019 - In Peter Dabrock, Matthias Braun & Patrik Hummel (eds.), The Ethics of Medical Data Donation. Springer Verlag.
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  22. The Definition of Person.Jenny Teichman - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (232):175-185.
    In one of the Theological Tractates, Boethius wrote ‘ we have found the definition of Person, viz: “The individual substance of a rational nature”’. He justifies the definition partly by a consideration of Latin and Greek etymologies and partly by stating ‘what Person cannot be affirmed of’. Person cannot be affirmed of Universals, accidents, relations, lifeless bodies, living bodies without sense , nor of ‘that which is bereft of mind and reason’.
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  23.  41
    Multiple dimensions of embodiment in medical practices.Jenny Slatman - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):549-557.
    In this paper I explore the various meanings of embodiment from a patient’s perspective. Resorting to phenomenology of health and medicine, I take the idea of ‘lived experience’ as starting point. On the basis of an analysis of phenomenology’s call for bracketing the natural attitude and its reduction to the transcendental, I will explain, however, that in medical phenomenological literature ‘lived experience’ is commonly one-sidedly interpreted. In my paper, I clarify in what way the idea of ‘lived experience’ should be (...)
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  24.  31
    Human heredity after 1945: Moving populations centre stage.Jenny Bangham & Soraya de Chadarevian - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:45-49.
  25.  80
    Social constructivism in mathematics? The promise and shortcomings of Julian Cole’s institutional account.Jenni Rytilä - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):11517-11540.
    The core idea of social constructivism in mathematics is that mathematical entities are social constructs that exist in virtue of social practices, similar to more familiar social entities like institutions and money. Julian C. Cole has presented an institutional version of social constructivism about mathematics based on John Searle’s theory of the construction of the social reality. In this paper, I consider what merits social constructivism has and examine how well Cole’s institutional account meets the challenge of accounting for the (...)
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  26.  17
    The Oxford Handbook of Process Philosophy and Organization Studies.Jenny Helin, Tor Hernes, Daniel Hjorth & Robin Holt (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The Handbook examines 34 philosophical thinkers, both those commonly linked to process thinking, such as Whitehead, Bergson and James, and those that are not as often addressed from a process perspective such as Dilthey and Tarde. Each chapter addresses the background and context of this thinker, their work, and the potential contribution to organization and management research.
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  27. Psychophysiological Effects of Downregulating Negative Emotions: Insights From a Meta-Analysis of Healthy Adults.Jenny Zaehringer, Christine Jennen-Steinmetz, Christian Schmahl, Gabriele Ende & Christian Paret - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  28.  68
    Likeness and likelihood in the Presocratics and Plato.Jenny Bryan - 2012 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The Greek word eoikos can be translated in various ways. It can be used to describe similarity, plausibility or even suitability. This book explores the philosophical exploitation of its multiple meanings by three philosophers, Xenophanes, Parmenides and Plato. It offers new interpretations of the way that each employs the term to describe the status of their philosophy, tracing the development of this philosophical use of eoikos from the fallibilism of Xenophanes through the deceptive cosmology of Parmenides to Plato's Timaeus. The (...)
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  29.  13
    The language of sound: events and meaning multitasking of words.Jenny Hartman & Carita Paradis - 2023 - Cognitive Linguistics 34 (3-4):445-477.
    The focus of much sensory language research has been on vocabulary and codability, not how language is used in communication of sensory perceptions. We make a case for discourse-oriented research about sensory language as an alternative to the prevailing vocabulary orientation. To consider the language of sound in authentic textual data, we presented participants with 20 everyday sounds of unknown sources and asked them to describe the sounds in as much detail as possible, as if describing them to someone who (...)
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  30.  31
    Somebody That I Used to Know: The Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Social Identity in Post-disaster Business Communities.Jenni Dinger, Michael Conger, David Hekman & Carla Bustamante - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (1):115-141.
    The frequency and severity of natural disasters and extreme weather events are increasing, taking a dramatic economic and relational toll on the communities they strike. Given the critical role that entrepreneurship plays in a community’s viability, it is necessary to understand how small business owners respond to these events and move forward over time. This study explores the long-term dynamics and trajectory of individuals within the broader business community following a natural disaster, paying particular attention to the influence of social (...)
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  31.  42
    Blood groups and human groups: Collecting and calibrating genetic data after World War Two.Jenny Bangham - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:74-86.
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  32.  48
    Words in a sea of sounds: the output of infant statistical learning.Jenny R. Saffran - 2001 - Cognition 81 (2):149-169.
  33.  91
    Statistical learning of tone sequences by human infants and adults.Jenny R. Saffran, Elizabeth K. Johnson, Richard N. Aslin & Elissa L. Newport - 1999 - Cognition 70 (1):27-52.
  34. Post-traumatic growth following acquired brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.Jenny J. Grace, Elaine L. Kinsella, Orla T. Muldoon & Dónal G. Fortune - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:153990.
    The idea that acquired brain injury (ABI) caused by stroke, hemorrhage, infection or traumatic insult to the brain can result in post-traumatic growth (PTG) for individuals is increasingly attracting psychological attention. However, PTG also attracts controversy as a result of ambiguous empirical findings. The extent that demographic variables, injury factors, subjective beliefs, and psychological health are associated with PTG following ABI is not clear. Consequently, this systematic review and meta-analysis explores the correlates of variables within these four broad areas and (...)
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  35.  75
    All words are not created equal: Expectations about word length guide infant statistical learning.Jenny R. Saffran & Casey Lew-Williams - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):241-246.
    Infants have been described as 'statistical learners' capable of extracting structure (such as words) from patterned input (such as language). Here, we investigated whether prior knowledge influences how infants track transitional probabilities in word segmentation tasks. Are infants biased by prior experience when engaging in sequential statistical learning? In a laboratory simulation of learning across time, we exposed 9- and 10-month-old infants to a list of either disyllabic or trisyllabic nonsense words, followed by a pause-free speech stream composed of a (...)
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  36. I won’t do it! Self-prediction, moral obligation and moral deliberation.Jennie Louise - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (3):327 - 348.
    This paper considers the question of whether predictions of wrongdoing are relevant to our moral obligations. After giving an analysis of ‘won’t’ claims (i.e., claims that an agent won’t Φ), the question is separated into two different issues: firstly, whether predictions of wrongdoing affect our objective moral obligations, and secondly, whether self-prediction of wrongdoing can be legitimately used in moral deliberation. I argue for an affirmative answer to both questions, although there are conditions that must be met for self-prediction to (...)
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  37.  11
    Nature's Palace: Constructing the Swedish Museum of Natural History.Jenny Beckman - 2004 - History of Science 42 (1):85-111.
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  38.  38
    Can a Welfarist Approach be Used to Justify a Moral Duty to Cognitively Enhance Children?Jenny Krutzinna - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (7):528-535.
    The desire to self-improve is probably as old as humanity: most of us want to be smarter, more athletic, more beautiful, or more talented. However, in the light of an ever increasing array of possibilities to enhance our capacities, clarity about the purpose and goal of such efforts becomes crucial. This is especially true when decisions are made for children, who are exposed to their parents’ plans and desires for them under a notion of increasing wellbeing. In recent years, cognitive (...)
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  39.  22
    BioEssays 11/2019.Jenny A. Allen - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (11):1970111.
    Graphical AbstractSocial learning and culture occur in a wide variety of animal species and across many different types of community structures. In article number 1900060, Jenny A. Allen present an overview of social learning in species across a spectrum of community structures, providing the necessary infrastructure to allow a comparison of studies that will help move the field of animal culture forward. Art designer: Emma Hilton.
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  40. Simulating (some) individuals in a connected world.Jenny Krutzinna - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):403-404.
    Braun explores the use of digital twin technology in medicine with a particular emphasis on the question of how such simulations can represent a person.1 In defining some first conditions for ethically justifiable forms of representation of digital twins, he argues that digital twins do not threaten an embodied person, as long as that person retains control over their simulated representation via dynamic consent, and ideally with the option to choose both form and usage of the simulation. His thoughtful elaboration (...)
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  41.  30
    Sleep-wake processes play a key role in early infant crying.Oskar G. Jenni - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):464-465.
    The crying curve across early infancy may reflect the developing interaction between circadian and homeostatic processes of sleep-wake regulation. Excessive crying may be interpreted as a misalignment of the two processes. On the basis of the proposed mechanism, excessive crying may be an honest signal of need, namely, to elicit parental resources to modulate the behavioral state.
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  42.  58
    Philosophy: a beginner's guide.Jenny Teichman - 1991 - Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. Edited by Katherine C. Evans.
  43.  25
    “A Matter of Long Centuries and Not Years”: Du Bois on the Temporality of Social Change.Jennie C. Ikuta - 2024 - Political Theory 52 (2):289-316.
    In light of the summer 2020 protests and their subsequent backlash, questions about the prospective timeline for achieving a racially just society have taken on renewed significance. This article investigates Du Bois’s writings between 1920 and 1940 as a lens through which to examine the temporality of social change. I argue that Du Bois’s turn to the role of white unreason explains the dual temporality of his political vision and the dual strategies that ensue. According to Du Bois, white supremacy (...)
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  44.  54
    I won’t do it! Self-prediction, moral obligation and moral deliberation.Jennie Louise - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (3):327-348.
    This paper considers the question of whether predictions of wrongdoing are relevant to our moral obligations. After giving an analysis of 'won't' claims, the question is separated into two different issues: firstly, whether predictions of wrongdoing affect our objective moral obligations, and secondly, whether self-prediction of wrongdoing can be legitimately used in moral deliberation. I argue for an affirmative answer to both questions, although there are conditions that must be met for self-prediction to be appropriate in deliberation. The discussion illuminates (...)
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  45.  26
    Psychological Aspects of Individualized Choice and Reproductive Autonomy in Prenatal Screening.Jenny Hewison - 2014 - Bioethics 29 (1):9-18.
    Probably the main purpose of reproductive technologies is to enable people who choose to do so to avoid the birth of a baby with a disabling condition. However the conditions women want information about and the ‘price’ they are willing to pay for obtaining that information vary enormously. Individual women have to arrive at their own prenatal testing choices by ‘trading off’ means and ends in order to resolve the dilemmas facing them. We know very little about how individuals make (...)
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  46.  39
    William Ockham on metaphysics: the science of being and God.Jenny E. Pelletier - 2013 - Boston: Brill.
    In William Ockham on Metaphysics, Jenny E. Pelletier gives an account of Ockham's concept of metaphysics as the science of being and God as it emerges sporadically throughout his philosophical and theological work.
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  47.  14
    The shaping of activist recruitment and participation: A study of women in the mississippi civil rights movement.Jenny Irons - 1998 - Gender and Society 12 (6):692-709.
    This article focuses on the ways gendered experiences varied by race with regard to women's recruitment and participation in the civil rights movement of Mississippi. The author analyzes 13 interviews with both African American and white women who were connected to the movement. By privileging the voices of movement actors, this study begins to illuminate the ways recruitment and participation varied by race. Three types of women's participation are distinguished: high-risk activism, low-risk institutional, and activist mothering and “women's work.” Explanations (...)
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  48. Enabling posthumous medical data donation: an appeal for the ethical utilisation of personal health data.Jenny Krutzinna, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1357-1387.
    This article argues that personal medical data should be made available for scientific research, by enabling and encouraging individuals to donate their medical records once deceased, similar to the way in which they can already donate organs or bodies. This research is part of a project on posthumous medical data donation developed by the Digital Ethics Lab at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. Ten arguments are provided to support the need to foster posthumous medical data donation. (...)
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  49.  43
    Grammatical pattern learning by human infants and cotton-top tamarin monkeys.Jenny Saffran, Marc Hauser, Rebecca Seibel, Joshua Kapfhamer, Fritz Tsao & Fiery Cushman - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):479-500.
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  50. Breaking the Cycle: Solidarity with care-leaver mothers.Jenny Krutzinna - 2021 - Journal of Diversity and Gender Studies 7 (2):82-92.
    A significant proportion of child protection cases involve care-experienced mothers, which reveals a continuous cycle of mothers who lose their children to social services after having been in state care themselves as children. While the importance of protecting children requires little explanation and forms the justificatory basis for child protection interventions, it is important to remember that care-experienced mothers were once children entrusted to the state’s care, and who arguably have been failed by the state in that their parenting opportunities (...)
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