Order:
Disambiguations
Jeremy Bell [6]Jeremy R. Bell [3]
See also
Jeremy Bell
Emory University
  1. Catalin Partenie and Tom Rockmore, Eds., Heidegger and Plato: Toward Dialogue Reviewed By.Jeremy Bell - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (5):372-374.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  35
    Empeiria Kai Tribē.Jeremy R. Bell - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):379-394.
    In this essay I trace the terms empeiria and tribē throughout the Platonic corpus in order to expose their central position within Plato’s critique of the sophists and rhetoricians. I find that these two terms—both of which indicate a knack or habitude that has been developed through experiential familiarity with certain causal tendencies—are regularly deployed in order to account for the effectiveness of these speakers even in the absence of a technē; for, what Plato identifies with these terms is the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    Empeiria Kai Tribē: Plato on the “Art” of Flattery in Rhetoric and Sophistry.Jeremy R. Bell - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):379-394.
    In this essay I trace the terms empeiria and tribē throughout the Platonic corpus in order to expose their central position within Plato’s critique of the sophists and rhetoricians. I find that these two terms—both of which indicate a knack or habitude that has been developed through experiential familiarity with certain causal tendencies—are regularly deployed in order to account for the effectiveness of these speakers even in the absence of a technē; for, what Plato identifies with these terms is the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  8
    Ἡ Δημεραστία.Jeremy R. Bell - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):261-276.
    This article analyzes the relationship between ethics and politics in Plato’s dialogues. I argue that Plato set forth the care of the self as the organizing principle of ethics and as the idealized form of politics, both of which are conceived of as practices of care insofar as they are directed toward the attainment of the good. I conclude by demonstrating that, while the idealized form of politics is conceived of as a practice of care, such care turns against and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  13
    Plato’s Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts.Jeremy Bell & Michael Naas (eds.) - 2015 - Indiana University Press.
    Plato's Animals examines the crucial role played by animal images, metaphors, allusions, and analogies in Plato's Dialogues. These fourteen lively essays demonstrate that the gadflies, snakes, stingrays, swans, dogs, horses, and other animals that populate Plato's work are not just rhetorical embellishments. Animals are central to Plato's understanding of the hierarchy between animals, humans, and gods and are crucial to his ideas about education, sexuality, politics, aesthetics, the afterlife, the nature of the soul, and philosophy itself. The volume includes a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  11
    Parrhēsia and Statesmanship in Plato’s Gorgias.Jeremy Bell - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):63-82.
  7. Spinoza's Subversive Textbook.Jeremy Bell - 2014 - Interpretation 40 (3):377-410.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  16
    The Coherence of Socrates’s Mission in Advance.Jeremy Bell - forthcoming - International Philosophical Quarterly.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  7
    The Coherence of Socrates’s Mission.Jeremy Bell - 2016 - International Philosophical Quarterly 56 (3):297-314.
    The debate over Socrates’s claim in the Apology to have practiced philosophy as a divinely ordained mission is almost as old as this claim itself. Yet scholars remain divided over the issue because of the extraordinary difficulty of understanding how Socrates interpreted the negative proclamation of the oracle as providing a positive prescription for a way of life. Finding this difficultly insurmountable, many authors have denied the coherence of Socrates’s account. In this essay, I argue that the debate can be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark